Alex Cora

José Alexander Cora (born October 18, 1975) is a Puerto Rican professional baseball manager and former infielder. He is the manager for the Boston Red Sox of Major League Baseball (MLB). Cora led the team to the 2018 World Series championship in his first season as a manager, becoming the fifth manager to do so in MLB history and the first as a Puerto Rican manager.[1]

Cora played college baseball at the University of Miami before playing in MLB for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox, New York Mets, Texas Rangers, and Washington Nationals from 1998 through 2011. Cora was a baseball analyst for ESPN before becoming a coach and manager.

Alex Cora
Alex Cora 2008 (cropped)
Cora with the Boston Red Sox in 2008
Boston Red Sox – No. 20
Shortstop / Second baseman / Manager
Born: October 18, 1975 (age 43)
Caguas, Puerto Rico
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 7, 1998, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
Last MLB appearance
September 28, 2011, for the Washington Nationals
MLB statistics
Batting average.243
Home runs35
Runs batted in286
Managerial record153-94
Winning %.619
Teams
As player

As manager

As coach

Career highlights and awards

Playing career

Early career

Cora was drafted in the 12th round of the 1993 Major League Baseball draft by the Minnesota Twins, but did not sign a contract and decided instead to play collegiate baseball at the University of Miami. While there, Cora was named to the College World Series all-tournament team in both 1995 and 1996. He led the team to the title game in 1996, a game they lost to Louisiana State University.

Cora was rated by Baseball America as the best collegiate defensive player going into the 1996 draft. Cora was drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the third round, and played 61 games of the 1996 season with the Class A-Advanced Vero Beach Dodgers, batting .257 with no home runs and 26 RBIs. He played the 1997 season with the Double-A San Antonio Missions; in 127 games he batted .234 with 3 home runs and 48 RBIs. Cora spent parts of the 1998, 1999, and 2000 seasons with the Triple-A Albuquerque Dukes, hitting .264 in 81 games, .308 in 80 games, and .373 in 30 games, respectively.

Los Angeles Dodgers

Cora made his major league debut on June 7, 1998, with the Dodgers against the Seattle Mariners; his brother Joey Cora was Seattle's starting second baseman in the game.[2] Alex Cora spent the next seven years in Los Angeles, appearing in a total of 684 games while batting .246 with 27 home runs and 173 RBIs. During his time with the Dodgers, he played at second base and shortstop. During the 2000 and 2001 seasons, Cora mostly played shortstop as the Dodgers moved the aging Mark Grudzielanek to second base. With the emergence of César Izturis in 2002, and the trade of Grudzielanek to the Chicago Cubs in December of the same year, Cora spent the rest of his stint with the Dodgers as their primary second baseman.

Cora played in one postseason series with the Dodgers, the 2004 NLDS, which the Dodgers lost to the St. Louis Cardinals. Cora was the Dodgers' second baseman in all four games, batting 2-for-15 (.133) during the series.

Cleveland Indians

In January 2005, Cora signed as a free agent with the Cleveland Indians, where he appeared in 49 games, with 22 starts at shortstop and 14 at second base; he batted .205 with a home run and 8 RBIs. On July 7, 2005, Cora was traded to the Boston Red Sox for infielder Ramón Vázquez.

Boston Red Sox

Alexcora
Cora with the Red Sox, turning a double-play against the Los Angeles Angels at Fenway Park on April 16, 2007

Cora made his Red Sox debut on July 7, 2005, and through the end of the regular season appeared in a total of 47 games for Boston, batting .269 with 2 home runs and 16 RBIs. In the 2005 ALDS, which Boston lost to the Chicago White Sox in a three-game sweep, Cora played in one game as a defensive replacement, without a plate appearance.

Cora was originally intended to back up shortstop Édgar Rentería. With the trade of Rentería to the Atlanta Braves in December 2005, Cora was being eyed to take the position of starting shortstop, until the Red Sox acquired Álex González in February 2006. For the 2006 season, Cora appeared in 96 games, batting .238 with one home run and 18 RBIs.

Cora was a member of the Red Sox team that won the 2007 World Series. During the regular season, he appeared in 83 games and batted .246 with 3 home runs and 18 RBIs. In the postseason, he appeared as a late-innings defensive replacement in two games of the 2007 ALCS and two games of the World Series. He had one plate appearance, a sacrifice bunt in World Series game 3.

For the 2008 regular season, Cora played in 75 games, batting .270 with no home runs and 9 RBIs. He appeared in four postseason games; two games of the 2008 ALDS, which Boston won, and two games of the 2008 ALCS, which Boston lost. He batted 4-for-26 (.154) with no home runs and one RBI. These games were the final postseason appearances for Cora as a player.

On October 30, 2008, Cora became a free agent. In his four seasons with Boston, he appeared in 301 regular season games, batting .252 with 6 home runs and 61 RBIs.

New York Mets

On January 22, 2009, Cora signed a one-year deal with the New York Mets.[3] During the 2009 season, he appeared in 82 games, batting .251 with one home run and 18 RBIs. In November 2009, Cora re-signed with the Mets for the 2010 season, with an option for 2011. He was released by the Mets on August 7, 2010[4] — at the time, he was batting .207 with no home runs and 20 RBIs, having played in 62 games of the 2010 season. In his time with the Mets, Cora appeared in a total of 144 games, with a .234 batting average, 1 home run, and 38 RBIs.

Texas Rangers

On August 17, 2010, Cora signed a minor league contract with the Texas Rangers, and was assigned to their Triple-A affiliate Oklahoma City, where he appeared in 6 games, batting 4-for-22 (.182). He then played four games for the Rangers, batting 2-for-7 (.286). The Rangers released Cora on September 7. Despite his limited time with Texas, the team later rewarded him with an AL Championship ring.

Washington Nationals

Alex Cora 2011 (cropped)
Alex Cora with the Washington Nationals in 2011

In January 2011, the Nationals signed Cora to a minor league contract.[5] During the 2011 season, he appeared in 91 games for Washington, batting .224 with no home runs and 6 RBIs. Cora's final MLB appearance was with the Nationals on September 28, 2011, when he tripled as a pinch hitter against the Florida Marlins.[6]

Late career

Following the 2011 season, Cora played winter baseball in Puerto Rico, after which he announced his retirement; shortly thereafter he clarified that he was retiring only from winter baseball.[7] He agreed to a minor league contract with the St. Louis Cardinals on February 5, 2012.[8] After batting .208 with one RBI in 24 plate appearances in spring training, Cora was released by the defending World Series champions on March 25, 2012.[9]

Notable games

With the Dodgers on May 12, 2004, Cora had an 18-pitch at-bat against Chicago Cubs starting pitcher Matt Clement. Facing a 2–1 count, Cora fouled off 14 straight pitches before finally hitting a home run.[10] It is the third longest documented at-bat since baseball statisticians began keeping track of pitch counts in the mid-1980s.[11] So much time elapsed that Cora's brother Joey joked that he and a friend were watching the game at a restaurant, ordering their first beer during the first pitch, and by the time Cora homered they were "so drunk that we had to call a cab to take us home."[12]

Cora played in the two longest nine-inning games in MLB history. The first was a 4-hour, 27-minute game on October 5, 2001, between the Dodgers and the San Francisco Giants.[13] The second game, and the longest on record, was a 4-hour, 45-minute game on August 18, 2006, the second game of a doubleheader between the Red Sox and the New York Yankees.[13] Cora entered the 2001 game as a defensive replacement in the eighth inning,[14] and was the starting shortstop in the 2006 game.[15]

In the third game of the 2018 MLB World Series, Cora managed the Boston Red Sox in the longest game in World Series history: an 18-inning, 7-hour-and-20-minute, 561-pitch game that began on Friday, October 26, at 5:09 pm and ended after midnight the next day. The Los Angeles Dodgers, being down two games to none, won 3-2 on a walk-off home run by Max Muncy.[16]

International career

Cora played for Puerto Rico in both the 2006 and 2009 World Baseball Classics; he batted 2-for-15 (.133) and 1-for-8 (.125) in those tournaments, respectively.[17] Cora was the general manager of the Puerto Rico national baseball team until he became Manager of the Red Sox in 2018.[18]

Post-playing career

Broadcasting

From February 2013 to November 2016, Cora was a color analyst for baseball on ESPN and ESPN Deportes.[19]

Coaching

On November 15, 2016, Cora became the bench coach for the Houston Astros.[20] Cora assumed managerial duties on three occasions during the 2017 season, following ejections of Astros manager A.J. Hinch.[21][22][23][24]

On August 25, 2017, Cora was ejected from a game against the Los Angeles Angels by home plate umpire Laz Díaz.[25] Cora argued that the baseball had too much dirt on it and should be removed from play; this was Cora's first career MLB ejection.[26]

Cora received his second World Series ring as a coach while with the Astros.

Managerial career

Red Sox

During the 2017 ALCS, Cora interviewed for the open managerial position of the Boston Red Sox.[27] It was subsequently reported that Cora would be named as Red Sox manager.[28][29] On October 22, the day after the Astros defeated the New York Yankees in the 2017 ALCS, the Red Sox announced a three-year managerial contract for Cora, for the 2018 through 2020 seasons, with an option for 2021.[30]

Cora formally assumed the role on November 2, 2017, following the World Series. On August 3, 2018, Cora was ejected for the first time as a manager by home plate umpire Adam Hamari for arguing warnings being issued to both benches by first base umpire and crew chief Phil Cuzzi in a game against the Yankees.[31] Cora and the 2018 Red Sox finished with 108 wins and 54 losses.[32]

In the American League Division Series, the Red Sox eliminated the New York Yankees, three games to one,[33] and advanced to the American League Championship Series.[33] Cora received his first postseason ejection on October 13, in Game 1 of the ALCS against the Houston Astros. He was ejected by home plate umpire James Hoye between the 5th and 6th innings for arguing balls and strikes.[34] On October 18, Cora's 43rd birthday, the Red Sox defeated the Astros, 4–1, to win the ALCS in five games.[35] The Red Sox then defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in the World Series in five games to give Cora his first championship as a manager and third overall.[36] Cora became the fifth rookie manager to win a World Series, the others being Bob Brenly in 2001, Ralph Houk in 1961, Eddie Dyer in 1946, Bucky Harris in 1924.[37] In voting for the AL Manager of the Year Award, Cora finished second to Bob Melvin of the Oakland Athletics.[38]

On November 14, 2018, the Red Sox announced that they had renegotiated Cora's contract, including an extension through the 2021 season, with a club option for 2022.[39]

Managerial record

As of games played on July 5, 2019. [40]
Team Year Regular season Postseason
Games Won Lost Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
BOS 2018 162 108 54 .667 1st in AL East 11 3 .786 Won World Series
BOS 2019 85 47 41 .529 TBD
Total 247 153 94 .619 11 3 .786

Personal life

Cora lives in Caguas, Puerto Rico, during the off-season. He is married and has four children, including twins born during the 2017 season.[41][42]

Cora is a 2006 inductee of the University of Miami Sports Hall of Fame.[41]

His older brother is Joey Cora, a former MLB utility player and current coach.[43]

After winning the 2018 World Series, Cora took the World Series trophy to his hometown of Caguas on November 3, 2018.[44]

Philanthropy

Cora was involved in relief help for Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria in 2017.[45][46]

See also

References

  1. ^ "ESPN: The Worldwide Leader in Sports". ESPN.com. Retrieved November 2, 2018.
  2. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers 7, Seattle Mariners 4". Retrosheet. June 7, 1998.
  3. ^ "Mets sign Alex Cora to a one-year contract". MLB.com (Press release). January 22, 2009. Archived from the original on October 21, 2017. Retrieved October 20, 2017.
  4. ^ DiComo, Anthony (August 7, 2010). "Mets call up F-Mart, Tejada; Cora cut". MLB.com. Retrieved October 20, 2017.
  5. ^ Ladson, Bill (January 17, 2011). "Cora lands Minor League deal with Nationals". MLB.com. Archived from the original on October 21, 2017. Retrieved October 20, 2017.
  6. ^ "Washington Nationals 3, Florida Marlins 1". Retrosheet. September 28, 2011.
  7. ^ Nichols, Cheryl (January 25, 2012). "Former Nats: Alex Cora announces retirement from winter ball (Updated)". districtsportspage.com.
  8. ^ Sanchez, Jesse (February 6, 2012). "Cora joins Cards on Minor League deal". MLB.com.
  9. ^ "Cardinals release Alex Cora & Koyie Hill". KTVO. AP. March 25, 2012. Retrieved March 25, 2012.
  10. ^ "Alex Cora - MLB Record - May 12, 2004". Retrieved October 21, 2017 – via YouTube.
  11. ^ Singer, Tom (May 26, 2006). "Mastering art of the prolonged at-bat". MLB.com. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  12. ^ Benjamin, Amalie (July 16, 2005). "An at-bat for the ages". Boston.com. Retrieved August 26, 2006.
  13. ^ a b "Game Length Records". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  14. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers 11, San Francisco Giants 10". Retrosheet. October 5, 2001.
  15. ^ "New York Yankees 14, Boston Red Sox 11 (2)". Retrosheet. August 18, 2006.
  16. ^ in attendance
  17. ^ "Stats – World Baseball Classic". worldbaseballclassic.com. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  18. ^ Martínez, Noel Algarín (October 27, 2016). "Alex Cora apuesta a una alineación explosiva con Correa y Lindor". elnuevodia.com (in Spanish). Retrieved October 20, 2017.
  19. ^ Hudak, Kristen (February 19, 2013). "Aex Cora Joins ESPN as MLB Analyst in Multiplatform Role". ESPN MediaZone (Press release).
  20. ^ "Astros Roster & Staff". MLB.com. Retrieved August 26, 2017.
  21. ^ Kaplan, Jake (August 31, 2017). "Astros manager A.J. Hinch ejected by umpire Joe West". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved September 1, 2017.
  22. ^ "MLB Ejection 155 - Joe West (2; AJ Hinch)". closecallsports.com. August 31, 2017. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  23. ^ "MLB Ejections 181-182 - Dan Iassogna (HOU x2)". closecallsports.com. September 22, 2017. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  24. ^ "MLB Ejection 183 - Will Little (6; AJ Hinch)". closecallsports.com. September 24, 2017. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  25. ^ Teaford, Elliott (August 26, 2017). "Parker Bridwell loses duel with Collin McHugh as Angels fall to Astros". Orange County Register.
  26. ^ "MLB Ejection 151 - Laz Diaz (2; Alex Cora)". closecallsports.com. August 25, 2017. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  27. ^ Lauber, Scott (October 15, 2017). "Red Sox interview Astros bench coach Alex Cora for managerial job". ESPN.com. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  28. ^ Smith, Christopher (October 21, 2017). "Alex Cora to be named Boston Red Sox manager after Astros' playoff run, Nationals 'not in picture,' per report". masslive.com. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  29. ^ Rapaport, Daniel (October 19, 2017). "Report: Alex Cora to be Named Red Sox Manager After ALCS". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  30. ^ Browne, Ian (October 22, 2017). "Sox finalize 3-year deal with Cora to manage". MLB.com. Retrieved October 22, 2017.
  31. ^ Martin, Dan (August 3, 2018). "Alex Cora ejected as Yankees-Red Sox fireworks start early". nypost.com. Retrieved August 3, 2018.
  32. ^ "Álex Cora". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 9, 2018.
  33. ^ a b Hoffmann, Benjamin; Wagner, James (October 10, 2018). "Red Sox Eliminate Yankees From Playoffs in a Photo Finish". New York Times. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  34. ^ Harvey, Coley (October 14, 2018). "Alex Cora ejected from ALCS Game 1 for arguing with plate umpire". ESPN.
  35. ^ Nightengale, Bob (October 18, 2018). "Look out Dodgers, Brewers - these Red Sox look unstoppable". USA Today. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  36. ^ Doolittle, Bradford (October 28, 2018). "David Price, Steve Pearce lead Red Sox to World Series title". ESPN.com. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  37. ^ Andrew, Simon (October 28, 2018). "Rookie managers who won the World Series". ESPN.com. Retrieved October 28, 2018.
  38. ^ "Bob Melvin joins select company by winning Manager of the Year for the 3rd time". BBWAA. November 13, 2018. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  39. ^ Mastrodonato, Jason (November 14, 2018). "Red Sox extend Alex Cora through 2021 with new contract". Boston Herald. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  40. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/managers/coraal01.shtml
  41. ^ a b "ALEX CORA, 1993-1996". umsportshalloffame.com. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  42. ^ Bell, Mandy (July 21, 2017). "Cora away from Astros after birth of twins". MLB.com. Retrieved October 20, 2017.
  43. ^ "Joey Cora". Retrosheet. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  44. ^ Reardon, Sophie; McKinley, Kaitlin (November 3, 2018). "Alex Cora, Red Sox Take World Series Trophy to Puerto Rico". NBC Boston. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  45. ^ Thornburg, Chad (January 26, 2018). "Cora leading effort to deliver supplies to PR". MLB.com. Retrieved November 13, 2018.
  46. ^ Granderson, L. Z. (May 6, 2019). "Alex Cora's White House snub consistent with his stance on Puerto Rico". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved May 8, 2019.

Further reading

External links

1993 Major League Baseball draft

The 1993 Major League Baseball draft began with first round selections on June 3, 1993. Alex Rodriguez was selected first overall by the Seattle Mariners. Other notable draftees included Chris Carpenter, Torii Hunter, Jason Varitek, Scott Rolen, future NFL Hall of Famer Marshall Faulk, and Heisman Trophy winner Charlie Ward.

1995 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 1995 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1995 NCAA Division I baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its forty ninth year. Eight regional competitions were held to determine the participants in the final event. Each region was composed of six teams, resulting in 48 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The forty-ninth tournament's champion was Cal State Fullerton, coached by Augie Garrido. The Most Outstanding Player was Mark Kotsay of Cal State Fullerton.

1996 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 1996 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1996 NCAA Division I baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its fiftieth year. Eight regional competitions were held to determine the participants in the final event. Each region was composed of six teams, resulting in 48 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The fiftieth tournament's champion was LSU, coached by Skip Bertman. The Most Outstanding Player was Pat Burrell of Miami (FL).

2001 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 2001 season saw Jim Tracy take over as the Manager, after serving as the Bench coach the previous two seasons. The Dodgers won 86 games, finishing third in the Western Division of the National League, six games behind the eventual World Series champion Arizona Diamondbacks. This was their last season to be broadcast by KTLA (5).

Shawn Green had his best season, hitting a Dodger-record 49 home runs and also setting L.A. records for extra-base hits (84) and total bases (358). Paul Lo Duca became the full-time catcher and led the team with a .320 batting average and Jeff Shaw became the Dodgers all-time leader in saves, with 129.

2004 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 2004 season brought change to the Dodgers as the sale of the franchise to developer Frank McCourt was finalized during spring training. McCourt promptly dismissed General Manager Dan Evans and hired Paul DePodesta to take over the team. That led to a flurry of trade activity as the new group attempted to rebuild the Dodgers in their image.

Despite it all, the Dodgers managed to finish the season in first place in the Western Division of the National League and won their first post season game since 1988. However they lost the NL Division Series 3-1 to the St. Louis Cardinals.

2009 New York Mets season

The 2009 New York Mets season was a season in American baseball. It was the franchise's 48th season, and the team's first year at Citi Field, which opened on April 13 against the San Diego Padres. The Mets finished with a 70–92 record, as the season was plagued by many injuries.

2016 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 2016 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament began on Friday, June 3, 2016, as part of the 2016 NCAA Division I baseball season. The 64-team, double-elimination tournament concluded with the 2016 College World Series (CWS) in Omaha, Nebraska, starting on June 18, 2016, and ending on June 30, 2016. The 64 participating NCAA Division I college baseball teams were selected out of 298 eligible teams. Thirty-one teams were awarded an automatic bid, as champions of their conferences; the remaining 33 teams were selected at-large by the NCAA Division I Baseball Committee.

Teams were divided into sixteen regionals of four teams, which conducted a double-elimination tournament. Regional champions faced each other in Super Regionals, a best-of-three game series to determine the eight participants of the College World Series. The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) set a conference record and tied the all-time mark of having ten teams in the championship field. A tournament-high seven regional hosts came from the Southeastern Conference (SEC), followed by six of the ten ACC schools; however, only Miami (ACC) and Florida (SEC) advanced to Omaha, and they were the first and second teams eliminated, respectively. For the first time since the tournament expanded from 48 teams in 1999, the NCAA did not select any Pac-12 schools to host a regional, and Lubbock, Texas (Texas Tech) was the westernmost regional host city picked by the selection committee.In the CWS after Texas Tech lost to Big 12 rival TCU, none of the three national seeds who had reached Omaha had won their opening game. Tech eventually became the fourth team to be eliminated. While Oklahoma State and TCU advanced through the winners' bracket to set up a possible all–Big 12 championship, Arizona and Coastal Carolina won both elimination games to advance to the best-of-three final series.

With each team winning a game in the championship series to force a winner-take-all Game 3, the tournament reached the maximum of 17 games for the first time since 2003 when the finals expanded to best-of-three format (as opposed to a single, winner-take-all championship game). Coastal Carolina won the deciding game, 4-3, becoming the first team since 1956 to win the title in its first CWS appearance. Coastal Carolina won six elimination games in NCAA post-season play – one in a Regional, three in the CWS double-elimination bracket, and two in the Championship Series. The runner-up, Arizona, won six elimination games – three in a Regional and three in the CWS double-elimination bracket, but lost their 7th, the last game of the Championship Series.

2018 American League Championship Series

The 2018 American League Championship Series was a best-of-seven series pitting the defending World Series champion Houston Astros against the Boston Red Sox, for the American League (AL) pennant and the right to play in the 2018 World Series. The series was played in a 2-3-2 format, with the first two and last two (if necessary) games played at the home ballpark of the higher seeded team. The series was the 49th in league history, with TBS televising all games in the United States. The Red Sox defeated the Astros, in five games.

For the second year in a row, Major League Baseball sold presenting sponsorships to all of its postseason series; as with the NLCS, this ALCS was sponsored by Google Assistant and was officially known as the American League Championship Series presented by Google Assistant.The Red Sox would go on to defeat the Los Angeles Dodgers in the World Series in five games to win their ninth World Series championship.

2018 Boston Red Sox season

The 2018 Boston Red Sox season was the 118th season in the team's history, and their 107th season at Fenway Park. Under first year manager Alex Cora, the team finished with a 108–54 record, winning the American League East division title for the third consecutive season, and finished eight games ahead of the second-place New York Yankees. The Red Sox were the first MLB team to post 100 wins during the 2018 season, reaching that milestone for the first time since 1946; they were also the first team to clinch a berth in the 2018 postseason. The team set a new franchise record for wins in a season by surpassing the prior mark of 105 that had been set in 1912; they also won the most games by any MLB team since the 2001 Seattle Mariners won 116. Mookie Betts finished the season with the Major League batting title, hitting .346, while J. D. Martinez finished second in the majors with .330. Betts also won a Gold Glove and the Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award. Closer Craig Kimbrel became the fastest player in history to reach 300 career saves, finishing the season with 333.

The Red Sox entered the postseason as the top seed in the American League, and defeated the Yankees in four games in the Division Series. They then defeated the defending champion Houston Astros in five games in the Championship Series, advancing to the World Series where they defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in five games.

2018 World Series

The 2018 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's 2018 season. The 114th edition of the World Series was played between the American League (AL) champion Boston Red Sox and the National League (NL) champion Los Angeles Dodgers. The Red Sox beat the Dodgers in five games to win their fourth World Series title in 15 years dating back to 2004, and their ninth in franchise history. This was the second World Series match-up between the two franchises, after the Red Sox defeated the Brooklyn Robins (later known as the Dodgers) in five games in 1916. The series was sponsored by the Internet television service YouTube TV and officially known as the 2018 World Series presented by YouTube TV.The Series was televised in the United States on Fox. Steve Pearce won the World Series Most Valuable Player Award, while Alex Cora became the fifth first-season manager and first manager from Puerto Rico to win the World Series. The Series was notable for its third game which went for 18 innings, a World Series record.

The 2018 World Series was the first since 2000 to feature two teams which had also reached the postseason in the prior year. Additionally, the Red Sox became the first team to win two World Series exactly one century apart, as they had defeated the Chicago Cubs in 1918, while the Dodgers were the first team since the 2011 Texas Rangers, and the first NL team since the 1992 Atlanta Braves, to lose consecutive Fall Classics.

2019 Boston Red Sox season

The 2019 Boston Red Sox season is the 119th season in the team's history, and their 108th season at Fenway Park. The Red Sox enter the season as reigning World Series champions.

2019 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 2019 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 90th Major League Baseball All-Star Game. The game was hosted by the Cleveland Indians and was played at Progressive Field on July 9, 2019, with the American League prevailing over the National League, 4–3.The decision to name Cleveland the host city was announced on January 27, 2017 by Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred. It was the sixth All-Star Game in Cleveland, and the first since 1997; this established the Indians as the team to have hosted the most All-Star Games, breaking a four-way tie with the Pittsburgh Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals, and Cincinnati Reds, who have each hosted the game five times. It was also the first time since 2014 that an American League team has hosted the event. That All-Star Game also coincided with the 25th anniversary of Progressive Field and made it the second All-Star Game hosted by that ballpark. Alex Cora of the defending World Series champion Boston Red Sox managed the American League, and Dave Roberts of the Los Angeles Dodgers managed the National League for the second consecutive year.

Criollos de Caguas (baseball)

The Criollos de Caguas (English: Caguas Creoles) are a baseball team in the Puerto Rican Professional Baseball League. Based in the city of Caguas, they have won 18 national titles and five Caribbean World Series, including the 2017-2018 back-to-back.

From the mid-1940s until roughly 1970, the team was known as Caguas-Guayama and was jointly based in Caguas and in a nearby city, Guayama.

Dave Roberts (outfielder)

David Ray Roberts (born May 31, 1972) is an American professional baseball manager and former outfielder who is the current manager for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for five Major League teams over a ten-year career and then coached for the San Diego Padres before being named Dodgers manager for the 2016 season. The son of a Japanese mother and African American father, Roberts became the first manager of Asian heritage to lead a team to the World Series in 2017, when the Dodgers captured the National League pennant. Although he played for the Boston Red Sox for only part of one season, his most notable achievement as a player was a key stolen base in the 2004 ALCS that ignited the Red Sox's drive to their championship that year. Roberts batted and threw left-handed.

Joey Cora

José Manuel Cora Amaro (born May 14, 1965) is a former Major League Baseball player with an 11-year career in MLB spanning the years 1987 and 1989–1998. He played for the San Diego Padres of the National League and the Chicago White Sox, Seattle Mariners and Cleveland Indians of the American League. He played second base, shortstop, third base and also served as a designated hitter.

List of Boston Red Sox managers

The Boston Red Sox are a professional baseball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. The Red Sox are members of the American League (AL) East Division in Major League Baseball (MLB). There have been 47 different managers in their franchise history; four during the era of the Boston Americans (1901–1907) and the rest under the Boston Red Sox (1908–present). In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager, or more formally, the field manager. Since 1912, the Red Sox have played their home games at Fenway Park.Jimmy Collins was the first manager of the Americans and managed from 1901 to 1906. Joe Cronin managed the most games with 1,987 and wins with 1,071 with the Red Sox. Terry Francona, a recent manager of the Red Sox, managed the most playoff games with 42 and wins with 28. Bill Carrigan and Francona have each won two World Series championships. Carrigan won his two championships in 1915 and 1916, while Francona won his two championships in 2004 and 2007. John McNamara and Jimy Williams are the only two Red Sox managers to win the AL Manager of the Year Award, in 1986 and 1999 respectively. On October 22, 2017 the Red Sox named Alex Cora their manager after firing John Farrell on October 11, 2017.

Logos and uniforms of the Boston Red Sox

The primary home uniform for the Boston Red Sox is white with red piping around the neck and down either side of the front placket and "RED SOX" in red letters outlined in blue arched across the chest. This has been in use since 1979, and was previously used from 1933 to 1972, although the piping occasionally disappeared and reappeared; in between the Red Sox wore pullovers with the same "RED SOX" template. There are red numbers, but no player name, on the back of the home uniform.

MLB London Series

The MLB London Series is a two-year arrangement for Major League Baseball (MLB) to play a total of four regular season games at London Stadium in London, United Kingdom, in 2019 and 2020. Sponsored by Mitel, it was branded as Mitel & MLB Present London Series 2019. These were the first MLB games ever played in Europe.

The first games were played on June 29–30, 2019, with the Boston Red Sox hosting two games against the New York Yankees. The second set of games are scheduled for June 13–14, 2020, when the St. Louis Cardinals will host two games against the Chicago Cubs.

American League
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