Alcides Escobar

Alcides Escobar [al-see'-des / es-co-bar'] (born December 16, 1986) is a Venezuelan professional baseball shortstop in the Baltimore Orioles organization. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Milwaukee Brewers and Kansas City Royals.

Alcides Escobar
Kansas City Royals shortstop Alcides Escobar
Escobar with the Kansas City Royals
Baltimore Orioles
Shortstop
Born: December 16, 1986 (age 32)
La Sabana, Venezuela
Bats: Right Throws: Right
MLB debut
September 3, 2008, for the Milwaukee Brewers
MLB statistics
(through 2018 season)
Batting average.258
Home runs41
Runs batted in442
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early and personal life

He was born in La Sabana, Venezuela. Escobar is cousin to pitchers Edwin Escobar and Kelvim Escobar, as well as outfielder Ronald Acuña. He is also the nephew of shortstop José Escobar.[1]

Baseball career

Escobar started playing baseball when he was four years old, and said he idolized fellow Venezuelan shortstop Omar Vizquel.[2]

Milwaukee Brewers

Escobar signed at age 16 as an international free agent by the Milwaukee Brewers in 2003 for $35,000.[2]

In 2007, he split time between Single-A and Double-A, playing 63 games for the Brevard County Manatees of the Class A-Advanced Florida State League and 62 games for the Huntsville Stars of the Class AA Southern League. He batted a combined .306 with one home run and 53 runs batted in.

In 2008, Escobar played mostly for Huntsville. On September 1, 2008, when rosters expanded, Escobar was called up to the Majors for the first time and made his debut two days later as a defensive replacement at shortstop. He picked up his first hit in his first career at-bat in the same game, a single against Scott Schoeneweis of the New York Mets.

Alcides Escobar on August 14, 2009
Escobar with the Milwaukee Brewers in 2009.

Before the 2009 season, Baseball America rated Escobar the 19th best prospect in baseball. In 2009, Escobar appeared in the All-Star Futures Game as the starting shortstop for the World team. During the game, he went 2-for-4 and scored the go-ahead run. On August 12, Escobar was called up to the Brewers from the Triple-A Nashville Sounds to replace J. J. Hardy, who had been optioned down. He made his first major-league appearance of the season that night, pinch running for Prince Fielder in the bottom of the 9th against the San Diego Padres. Escobar stole second base, also advancing to third on a throwing error.

After the end of the 2009 season, the Brewers traded Hardy to the Minnesota Twins, making Escobar the starting shortstop for the Brewers in 2010. Before the 2010 season, Baseball America rated Escobar the 12th best prospect in baseball.

Kansas City Royals

On December 18, 2010, the Brewers traded Escobar, Lorenzo Cain, Jeremy Jeffress, and Jake Odorizzi to the Kansas City Royals for Zack Greinke and Yuniesky Betancourt.[3] In 2011 he batted .254/.290/.343.[4]

On March 15, 2012, Escobar signed a four-year, $10 million extension through 2015 with club options for 2016 and 2017 with the Royals. If both options were exercised, Escobar could earn $21.75 million. Escobar, who was slated to earn $519,500 in 2012, would instead earn $1 million in 2012 and $3 million a year from 2013-2015. His 2016 option was worth $5.25 million and had a $500,000 buyout. His 2017 option was worth $6.5 million and had a $500,000 buyout.[5] The extension covered his final pre-arbitration season and his three arbitration-eligible seasons. The club options covered his first year of free agency.[6]

In 2013, he batted .234/.259/.300, and his .259 on base percentage was the lowest of all qualified MLB batters.[7] His .300 slugging percentage was also the lowest among all qualified batters in MLB.[8]

In 2014, Escobar, along with Evan Longoria, Hunter Pence and Freddie Freeman were the only players in the MLB to start in all 162 regular season games for their respective teams.[9] He finished the season hitting .285, with 74 runs scored, 50 RBIs, and 31 stolen bases.[10]

In 2015, he batted .257/.293/.320. He led the majors in sacrifice hits, with 11.[11] His .320 slugging percentage was the lowest of all qualified major league batters.[12] He also had the lowest ISO (Isolated Power) of all MLB players in 2015, at .064.[13]

During the 2015 ALCS, Escobar set a postseason record by getting a leadoff hit in four consecutive games. He was selected as the 2015 ALCS MVP as he batted .478 in the series.[14] In Game 1 of the 2015 World Series, Escobar hit an inside-the-park home run on the first pitch thrown by the New York Mets' Matt Harvey.[15] It was the first time a player had hit an inside-the-park home run in a World Series game since 1929. He followed by driving in two runs and scoring once on two hits in Game 2.[16] In Game 5, Escobar hit a double in the 12th inning allowing the Christian Colon to score to help the Royals defeat the Mets 7-2 in 12 innings making the 2015 Kansas City Royals World Series Champions. In the 2015 postseason, Escobar hit .329 in 70 at bats. He had 23 hits including four doubles and three triples, 13 runs scored, and 9 RBI.[17] He was awarded the 2015 Rawlings AL Gold Glove for shortstops.[18]

In 2016, he batted .261/.292/.350. He again led the majors in sacrifice hits, with 10.[19]

On October 10, 2016, the Royals exercised Escobar's 2017 option. The Royals paid him $6.5 million in 2017. He batted .250/.272/.357 in 599 at bats, and shared the major league lead in sacrifice hits, with 7.[20] His .272 on base percentage was the lowest, and his .357 slugging percentage was the third-lowest, among all qualified batters in MLB.[21] He stole four bases, but was caught seven times.[4]

On January 29, 2018, Escobar re-signed with the Royals with a one-year, $2.5 million deal.[22] In 2018 he batted .231 (a career low)/.279/.313.[4] His .313 slugging percentage was the second-lowest among all qualified batters in MLB.[23]

Baltimore Orioles

On February 16, 2019, Escobar signed a minor-league contract with the Baltimore Orioles that included an invite to spring training.

See also

References

  1. ^ Pelota Binaria website
  2. ^ a b Kepner, Tyler (October 12, 2014). "How A Disgruntled Ace Gave the Royals a Full House". The New York Times Company. Retrieved October 13, 2014.
  3. ^ McCalvy, Adam (December 19, 2010). "Brewers add Greinke in deal with Royals". MLB.com. Retrieved December 19, 2010.
  4. ^ a b c Alcides Escobar Stats | Baseball-Reference.com
  5. ^ Dutton, Bob (March 15, 2012). "Escobar agrees to 4-year extension with Royals for guaranteed $10.5M". Kansas City Star.
  6. ^ Abrams, Max (March 15, 2012). "Kansas City Royals Sign Shortstop Alcides Escobar to Four-Year Contract". MLB Daily Dish.
  7. ^ 2013 Regular Season MLB Baseball Batting Statistics and League Leaders - Major League Baseball - ESPN
  8. ^ 2013 Regular Season MLB Baseball Batting Statistics and League Leaders - Major League Baseball - ESPN
  9. ^ "Stats incredible! Numbers from the 2014 MLB season will amaze you". sportingnews.com. Retrieved July 11, 2015.
  10. ^ Yahoo Sports
  11. ^ Major League Leaderboards » 2015 » Batters » Standard Statistics | FanGraphs Baseball
  12. ^ Major League Leaderboards » 2015 » Batters » Dashboard | FanGraphs Baseball
  13. ^ Major League Leaderboards » 2015 » Batters » Dashboard | FanGraphs Baseball
  14. ^ "Alcides Escobar of Kansas City Royals wins ALCS MVP after clutch series". ESPN.com. Retrieved October 24, 2015.
  15. ^ "WATCH: Alcides Escobar Scores Inside-the-Park Home Run". Heavy.com. Retrieved October 28, 2015.
  16. ^ CBS Sports
  17. ^ "Alcides Escobar". ESPN.com. Retrieved November 2, 2015.
  18. ^ Miller, Doug (November 10, 2015). "Defensive standouts nab Gold Glove Awards". MLB.com. Retrieved November 10, 2015.
  19. ^ Major League Leaderboards » 2016 » Batters » Standard Statistics | FanGraphs Baseball
  20. ^ Major League Leaderboards » 2017 » Batters » Standard Statistics | FanGraphs Baseball
  21. ^ 2017 Regular Season MLB Baseball Batting Statistics and League Leaders - Major League Baseball - ESPN
  22. ^ Adams, Steve (January 29, 2018). "Royals Re-Sign Alcides Escobar". MLB Trade Rumors. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  23. ^ 2018 Regular Season MLB Baseball Batting Statistics and League Leaders - Major League Baseball - ESPN

External links

2014 American League Championship Series

The 2014 American League Championship Series was a best-of-seven playoff pitting the Baltimore Orioles against the Kansas City Royals for the American League pennant and the right to play in the 2014 World Series. The Royals won the series four games to zero. The series was the 45th in league history with TBS airing all games in the United States. Even as the Royals swept the series, each game was decided by two runs or fewer.

To reach the 2014 ALCS, the Orioles (East Division champions, 96–66) defeated the Tigers (Central Division champions, 90–72) in the ALDS, 3 games to 0. The Royals (Wild Card, 89–73) defeated the Oakland Athletics in the AL Wild Card Game and then defeated the Angels (West Division champions, 98–64) in the ALDS, 3 games to 0.It was the first-ever postseason meeting between the two teams. It was the first ALCS since 2005 not to feature the Yankees, Red Sox, or Tigers.

The Royals would go on to lose to the San Francisco Giants in the World Series.

2014 American League Wild Card Game

The 2014 American League Wild Card Game was a play-in game during Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2014 postseason played between the American League's (AL) two wild card teams, the Oakland Athletics and the Kansas City Royals. It was held on September 30, 2014. The Royals won by a score of 9–8 in 12 innings, and advanced to play the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the 2014 American League Division Series.This was the second postseason meeting between the Athletics and Royals, having first met in the 1981 ALDS (Athletics won 3–0).

The 12-inning contest tied the then record for the longest (by innings) "winner-take-all" game in postseason history, shared with Game 7 of the 1924 World Series. This record was subsequently broken by the 2018 National League Wild Card Game .

2014 Kansas City Royals season

The Kansas City Royals' season of 2014 was the 46th for the Royals franchise. On September 26, 2014 the Royals clinched a playoff berth for the first time since 1985. They began the post-season by defeating the Oakland Athletics in the Wild Card Game and sweeping both the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the ALDS and the Baltimore Orioles in the ALCS, becoming the first team in Major League history to win their first 8 postseason games in a row. They lost to the San Francisco Giants in seven games in the 2014 World Series.

2014 World Series

The 2014 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2014 season. The 110th edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the National League (NL) champion San Francisco Giants and the American League (AL) champion Kansas City Royals. The series was played between October 21 to 29. The Giants defeated the Royals four games to three to clinch their third World Series championship in a five-season span (2010–14), and their third overall since the club's move to San Francisco from New York. It was the Giants' eighth World Series championship in franchise history.

The Giants won Game 1 behind a strong pitching performance by Madison Bumgarner while the Royals won Games 2 and 3 as their pitchers limited San Francisco to 2 runs per game. The Giants won Games 4 and 5, thanks to 11 runs in Game 4 and Bumgarner's complete game shutout in Game 5. Kansas City tied the series in Game 6, shutting out San Francisco and scoring 10 runs, which forced a Game 7. The Giants won the final game, 3–2, thanks to timely hitting, including the game-winning RBI by Michael Morse to score Pablo Sandoval. Bumgarner pitched five shutout innings in relief on two days' rest to clinch the championship, claiming the series MVP award.

2015 American League Championship Series

The 2015 American League Championship Series (ALCS) was a best-of-seven playoff contested between the Toronto Blue Jays and Kansas City Royals for the American League (AL) pennant and the right to play in the 2015 World Series. The series is the 46th in league history. The series was broadcast by Fox and Fox Sports 1 in the United States, with Fox airing Game 1 and Fox Sports 1 airing Games 2–6. Sportsnet, a property of Blue Jays owner Rogers Communications, simulcast Fox and Fox Sports 1's coverage in Canada. Game 1 took place on October 16, and the series ended with the Royals winning Game 6 on October 23.This was the second ALCS matchup between Kansas City and Toronto; the Royals previously rallied from a 3–1 deficit to defeat the Blue Jays in seven games in the 1985 ALCS.

The Royals would go on to defeat the New York Mets in the World Series in five games, winning their first World Series championship in 30 years.

2015 Kansas City Royals season

The 2015 Kansas City Royals season was the 47th for the franchise, and their 43rd at Kauffman Stadium. The Royals made their second consecutive World Series appearance in 2015, after winning the American League in 2014. They won the series for the first time since 1985. The team won their first AL Central title on September 24, 2015, the first time the Royals won their division since 1985. They opened the playoffs by defeating the Houston Astros in five games in the Division Series and then defeated the Toronto Blue Jays in six games in the American League Championship Series. They defeated the New York Mets in five games in the 2015 World Series, the second World Series championship in franchise history. The 2015 Royals are the first team since the 1989 Oakland Athletics to win the World Series after having lost the series in the previous season.

2015 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 2015 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 86th edition of the Major League Baseball All-Star Game. The game was played at Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati, Ohio on Tuesday, July 14. It was televised nationally on Fox. The American League All-Stars defeated the National League All-Stars by a score of 6–3.

On January 21, 2013, then-Major League Baseball (MLB) Commissioner Bud Selig, announced the 2015 All-Star Game would be hosted by the Cincinnati Reds. This was the first time the city of Cincinnati has hosted the All-Star Game since the 1988 All-Star Game was played at Riverfront Stadium.On July 15, 2014, Selig also announced that Pete Rose would not be prohibited from participating in the 2015 All-Star Game ceremonies. Rose was an All-Star for 13 of the 19 seasons he played on the Reds and was a member of the Big Red Machine. In 1991, Rose was permanently banned from MLB for baseball betting. Rose, wearing a red sport coat, appeared on the field in front of the pitcher's mound before the game and received a standing ovation alongside former teammates Johnny Bench, Barry Larkin, and Joe Morgan.

On May 12, 2015, the Reds announced that Todd Frazier would serve as the 2015 All-Star Game spokesperson.Mike Trout, an outfielder for the Los Angeles Angels, was named the 2015 All-Star Game Most Valuable Player for the second straight year.

2015 World Series

The 2015 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2015 season. The 111th edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the National League (NL) champion New York Mets and the American League (AL) champion Kansas City Royals. The series was played between October 27 and November 1, with the Royals winning the series 4 games to 1. It was the first time since the 2010 World Series that the World Series extended into November. The Royals became the first team since the Oakland Athletics in the 1989 World Series to win the World Series after losing in the previous year. It was the first World Series to feature only expansion teams and the first since the 2007 World Series to not feature the Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals, or San Francisco Giants as the NL champions.

The Royals had home field advantage for the first two games of the series because of the AL's 6–3 victory in the Major League Baseball All-Star Game. It was the 13th World Series in which home field advantage was awarded to the league that won the All-Star Game, a practice that was discontinued after the 2016 season. The series was played in a 2–3–2 format: the Royals hosted Games 1 and 2, and the Mets hosted Games 3, 4, and 5 (there was no Game 6 or 7, which the Royals would have hosted).

The Royals won Game 1 in extra innings. The Royals also won Game 2 with a complete game by Johnny Cueto, who allowed only one unearned run and two hits. With the series shifting to New York, the Mets won Game 3 with home runs by David Wright and Curtis Granderson. The Royals came from behind to win Game 4 after an error by Daniel Murphy led to a blown save by Jeurys Familia. Game 5 also went into extra innings, where bench player Christian Colón drove in the go-ahead run for the Royals, who clinched the series. Salvador Pérez was named the World Series Most Valuable Player.

Alcides (disambiguation)

"Alcides" may refer to:

Alcides Hübner, 1822, a genus of moths

Alcidodes Marshall, 1939, a genus of weevils, previously known as "Alcides Schoenherr, 1825

An alternative name for Heracles

Alcides Araújo Alves, known simply as Alcides (born 1985), a Brazilian footballer

Alcides Escobar, baseball player

Cardenales de Lara

The Cardenales de Lara (English: Lara Cardinals) is a baseball team in the Venezuelan Professional Baseball League. Founded in 1942 and based in Barquisimeto, the Cardenales have won five domestic titles, the most recent in 2019.

Didi Gregorius

Mariekson Julius "Didi" Gregorius, OON (born February 18, 1990), is a Dutch professional baseball shortstop for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played in MLB for the Cincinnati Reds in 2012 and the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2013 and 2014.

Inside-the-park home run

In baseball, an inside-the-park home run is a play where a batter hits a home run without hitting the ball out of the field of play. It is also known as an "in-the-park home run" or "in the park homer".

Jim Wolf

James Michael Wolf (born July 24, 1969) is a Major League Baseball umpire. He joined the major league staff in 1999 after working in the Arizona Rookie League, the South Atlantic League, the California League, the Texas League and the Pacific Coast League. He wears uniform number 28.

Kansas City Royals award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Kansas City Royals professional baseball team.

Kelvim Escobar

Kelvim José Escobar Bolívar (born April 11, 1976) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He played for the Toronto Blue Jays (1997–2003) and Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2004–2007, 2009).

In March 2008, Escobar revealed a tear in his right shoulder that required season-ending surgery. After missing all of the 2008 season, Escobar spent the first few months of 2009 in the minors. He returned to the majors on June 6, 2009, but made only one start before his career ended due to another shoulder injury.

Kansas City Royals shortstop Alcides Escobar is his first cousin.

La Sabana, Venezuela

La Sabana is one of the 7 villages to integrate the Caruao Parish in the Vargas Municipality of the Venezuelan state of Vargas.

La Sabana is the hometown of the Kansas City Royals and Tiburones de La Guaira shortstop Alcides Escobar and Atlanta Braves outfielder Ronald Acuña Jr..

Mule Haas

George William (Mule) Haas (October 15, 1903 – June 30, 1974) was a center fielder in Major League Baseball. From 1925 through 1938, Haas played for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1925), Philadelphia Athletics (1928–32, 1938) and Chicago White Sox (1933–37). He batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

In a 12-season career, Haas posted a .292 batting average with 43 home runs and 496 RBI in 1168 games.

A native of Montclair, New Jersey, Haas broke into the majors in 1925, appearing in four games with the Pittsburgh Pirates. In 1928 he joined the Philadelphia Athletics and was part of two World Championship teams in 1929 and 1930, and one American League champion team in 1931.

Haas enjoyed his finest moment in the 1929 World Series against the Chicago Cubs. In Game Four at Philadelphia, as the Athletics trailed 8–0 in the seventh inning, Haas hit a three-run inside-the-park home run as the Athletics rallied by scoring 10 runs in the inning to win, 10–8. This was the last inside-the-park home run in World Series history until Alcides Escobar did so in Game 1 of the 2015 World Series. Two days later, in what was to be the final game of the Series, Haas hit a two-run home run in the bottom of the ninth inning to tie the score, 2–2, as the Athletics later won the game on Bing Miller's RBI-double.

Philadelphia owner-manager Connie Mack began to dismantle the team in 1932 because of financial problems, and Haas was sent to the Chicago White Sox along with Al Simmons and Jimmy Dykes for an estimated $100,000. After five seasons in Chicago, Haas ended his career back in Philaldelphia in 1938.

Haas died in New Orleans, Louisiana on June 30, 1974, at the age of 70. He was buried in the Roman Catholic Immaculate Conception Cemetery in his native Montclair, New Jersey.

Patsy Dougherty

Patrick Henry "Patsy" Dougherty (October 27, 1876 – April 30, 1940) was a Major League Baseball outfielder from 1902 to 1911. He played for the Boston Americans (now the Boston Red Sox), the New York Highlanders (now the New York Yankees), and the Chicago White Sox.

On July 29, 1903, Dougherty became the second Red Sox player (then known as the Americans) to hit for the cycle. In Game 2 of the 1903 World Series, the first modern World Series, Dougherty became the first player to accomplish several feats; he became the first Boston player to hit a World Series home run, the first player to hit two home runs in a single World Series game, and the first player to hit a leadoff inside-the-park home run in a World Series game (a feat not matched until the 2015 World Series, by Alcides Escobar of the Kansas City Royals in Game 1).

Dougherty died in Bolivar, New York, at the age of 63 and was buried at St. Mary Catholic Cemetery in Bolivar.

Venezuela national baseball team

The Venezuela national baseball team is the national team of Venezuela. They are currently ranked ninth in the world by the World Baseball Softball Confederation.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.