Albert Finney

Albert Finney Jr. (9 May 1936 – 7 February 2019) was an English actor who worked in film, television and theatre. He attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and worked in the theatre before attaining prominence on screen in the early 1960s, debuting with The Entertainer (1960), directed by Tony Richardson, who had previously directed him in the theatre. He maintained a successful career in theatre, film and television.

He is known for his roles in Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (also 1960), Tom Jones (1963), Two for the Road (1967), Scrooge (1970), Annie (1982), The Dresser (1983), Miller's Crossing (1990), A Man of No Importance (1994), Erin Brockovich (2000), Big Fish (2003), The Bourne Ultimatum (2007), Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (2007), The Bourne Legacy (2012), and the James Bond film Skyfall (2012).

A recipient of BAFTA , Golden Globe, Emmy and Screen Actors Guild awards, Finney was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor four times, for Tom Jones (1963), Murder on the Orient Express (1974), The Dresser (1983), and Under the Volcano (1984); he was also nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in Erin Brockovich (2000). His performance as Winston Churchill in the BBCHBO television biographical film The Gathering Storm (2002) saw him receive a number of accolades.

Albert Finney
Albert Finney 1966
Born9 May 1936
Salford, England
Died7 February 2019 (aged 82)
London, England
EducationRoyal Academy of Dramatic Art
OccupationActor
Years active1956–2012
Spouse(s)
Jane Wenham
(m. 1957; div. 1961)

Anouk Aimée
(m. 1970; div. 1978)

Pene Delmage (m. 2006)
Children1

Early life

Finney was born in Salford, Lancashire, the son of Alice (née Hobson) and Albert Finney, a bookmaker.[1] He was educated at Tootal Drive Primary School, Salford Grammar School and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA), from which he graduated in 1956.[2]

Career

Early Career

While at RADA Finney made an early TV appearance playing Mr Hardcastle in Oliver Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer. The BBC filmed and broadcast the RADA students' performances at the Vanbrugh Theatre in London on Friday 6 January 1956. Other members of the cast included Roy Kinnear and Richard Briers.[3][4]

In February 1956 John Fernald, principal of RADA, gave Finney his first major role in the Vanbrugh Theatre's student production of Ian Dallas' play The Face of Love, as Shakespeare's Troilus.[5] Finney graduated from RADA and became a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Finney was offered a contract by the Rank Organisation but turned it down to perform for the Birmingham Rep.[6] He was in a production of The Miser for Birmingham Rep, which was filmed for the BBC in 1956. Also for the BBC he appeared in The Claverdon Road Job (1957) and View Friendship and Marriage (1958).

At Birmingham he played the title role in Henry V.[7]

Finney made his first appearance on the London stage in 1958, in Jane Arden's The Party, directed by Charles Laughton, who starred in the production along with his wife, Elsa Lanchester.

He guest starred on several episodes of Emergency-Ward 10 and was Lysander in a TV version of A Midsummer Night's Dream (1959) directed by Peter Hall.

In 1959 Finney appeared at Stratford in the title role in Coriolanus, replacing an ill Laurence Olivier.[8]

Film Stardom

Finney's first film appearance was in Tony Richardson's The Entertainer (1960), with Laurence Olivier. Finney and Alan Bates played Olivier's sons.

Finney made his breakthrough in the same year with his portrayal of a disillusioned factory worker in Karel Reisz's film version of Alan Sillitoe's Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960), produced by Richardson. The film was a box-office success, being the third most popular film in Britain that year. It earned over half a million pounds in profit.[9]

Finney then did Billy Liar (1960) on stage and for British television.[10]

Finney had been chosen to play T. E. Lawrence in David Lean's production of Lawrence of Arabia after a successful, and elaborate, screen-test that took four days to shoot. However, Finney baulked at signing a multi-year contract for producer Sam Spiegel and chose not to accept the role.[11]

Finney created the title role in Luther, the 1961 play by John Osborne depicting the life of Martin Luther, one of the foremost instigators of the Protestant Reformation. He performed the role with the English Stage Company in London, Nottingham, Paris and New York.[12] The original West End run at the Phoenix ended in March 1962, after 239 performances there, when Finney had to leave the cast to fulfill a contractual obligation with a film company.[13]

Tom Jones

Finney starred in the Academy Award-winning 1963 film Tom Jones, directed by Richardson and written by Osborne. The success of Tom Jones saw British exhibitors vote Finney the ninth most popular star at the box office in 1963.[14]

Finney followed this with a small part in The Victors (1963). He then made his Broadway debut in Luther in 1963. When that run ended he decided to take a year off and sail around the world.

The success of Tom Jones enabled Finney to turn producer on his next film, which he also starred in: Night Must Fall (1964). It was directed by Reisz.

"People told me to cash in on my success while I was hot," he later said. "I'd been acting for about eight years and had only had one vacation... Captain Cook had been a hero of mine when I was a kid, and I thought it would be exciting to go to some of the places in the Pacific where he'd been."[6]

Return to Acting

Finney returned to acting with a season of plays at the National.[15]

He returned to films with Two for the Road (1967) co starring Audrey Hepburn.

He and Michael Medwin formed a production company, Memorial Productions, which made Privilege (1967), directed by Peter Watkins; The Burning (1968), a short directed by Stephen Frears; and If.... (1968), directed by Lindsay Anderson.

Memorial also did stage productions, such as A Day in the Death of Joe Egg, which Finney performed in London and then Broadway.[16] They produced some in which Finney did not appear, such as Spring and Port Wine and The Burgular.

Memorial then made Charlie Bubbles (1968), which Finney starred in and also directed. Liza Minnelli made her feature debut in the movie.[17] Finney later called it "the most intense sense of creation I've ever had."[6]

As an actor only he made The Picasso Summer (1969).

Finney tried his hand at a musical with Scrooge (1970), playing the title role.

Finney then made Gumshoe (1971), the first feature directed by Stephen Frears, for Memorial.

Memorial continued to produce films in which Finney did not appear: Spring and Port Wine (1970), with James Mason; Loving Memory (1971), an early directorial effort from Tony Scott; Bleak Moments (1971), the first feature from Mike Leigh; O Lucky Man! (1973) for Anderson; and Law and Disorder (1974); hot in Hollywood.

In 1972 Finney returned to the stage after a six year absence with Alpha Beta, which he later filmed for TV with Rachel Roberts.[15]

Memorial Productions pulled out of producing and Finney focused on acting.

"It was OK at first," he later said, "but in the end it was sitting in an office, pitching ideas to Hollywood and waiting for the phone to ring."[18]

Murder on the Orient Express

Finney played Agatha Christie's Belgian master detective Hercule Poirot in the film Murder on the Orient Express (1974). The movie was a big hit Finney became so well known for the role that he complained that it typecast him for a number of years. "People really do think I am 300 pounds with a French accent", he said.[19][20]

He announced he intended to direct a film, The Girl in Melanie Klein, for Memorial, but it was not made.[21]

Finney decided to take time off from features and focus on stage acting, doing the classics at the National Theatre in London. "I felt that it needed commitment," he later said. "When you're making movies all the time, you stop breathing. You literally don't breathe in the same way that you do when you're playing the classics. When you have to deliver those long, complex speeches on stage, you can't heave your shoulders after every sentence. The set of muscles required for that kind of acting need to be trained. I really wanted to try and do justice to my own potential in the parts. I didn't want to be a movie actor just dropping in, doing Hamlet and taking off again. I wanted to feel part of the company."[6]

Finney was at the National for over three years, playing Hamlet, Macbeth, Tamerlane, and Chekhov, among others.[6]

Finney did make a TV movie Forget-Me-Not-Lane (1975), a TV movie written by Peter Nichols, and made a cameo in The Duellists (1977), the first feature directed by Ridley Scott. He also released an album through Motown.[22]

Return to Films

Finney had not played a lead role in a feature film in six years, and started to think about returning to cinema. The last two successful films he had made were Scrooge and Orient Express in which he was heavily diguised. "Most Americans probably think I weigh 300 pounds, have black hair and talk with a French accent like Hercule Poirot," said Finney. "So I thought they should have a look at me while I was still almost a juvenile and kind of cute."[6]

Finney decided to make six films in succession "so that I could relax and get back into it again. In order to feel really assured and comfortable in front of a camera, you've got to do it for a while."[6]

The first three were thrillers: Loophole (1981), with Susannah York; Wolfen (1981), directed by Michael Wadleigh; and Looker (1981), written and directed by Michael Crichton.[23]

He received excellent reviews for his performance in the drama Shoot the Moon (1982).[24] Finney said the role "required personal acting; I had to dig into myself. When you have to expose yourself and use your own vulnerability, you can get a little near the edge."[6]

Less well received was his performance as Daddy Warbucks in the Hollywood film version of Annie (1982), which was directed by John Huston. Finney said going into this film after Shoot the Moon was "marvelous. I use a completely different side of myself as Warbucks. 'Annie' is show biz; it's open, simple and direct. It needs bold, primary colors. I don't have to reveal the inner workings of the character, and that's a relief."[6]

Finney went into The Dresser (1983), directed by Peter Yates, which earned him a Best Actor Oscar Nomination. He then played the title role in the TV movie Pope John Paul II (1984), his American TV debut.

Huston cast Finney in the lead role of Under the Volcano (1984), which earned both men great acclaim, including another Oscar nomination for Finney.[25]

Finney returned to film directing The Biko Inquest, a 1984 dramatisation of the inquest into the death of Steve Biko which was filmed for TV following a London run. He also played the lead role of Sidney Kentridge.[26]

Finney performed on stage in Orphans in 1986, then did the film version , directed by Alan J. Pakula.[27] He had the lead in a TV mini series, The Endless Game (1989), written and directed by Bryan Forbes.

1990s

Finney began the 1990s with the lead role in a film for HBO, The Image (1990). He received great acclaim playing the gangster boss in Miller's Crossing (1990), replacing Trey Wilson shortly before filming.

Finney also made an appearance at Roger Waters' The Wall – Live in Berlin (1990), where he played "The Judge" during the performance of "The Trial".[28]

Finney did The Green Man (1990) for British TV, based on a novel by Kingsley Amis.[29]

He followed it with The Playboys (1992) for Gillies MacKinnon; Rich in Love (1993) for Bruce Beresford; The Browning Version (1994) for Mike Figgis; A Man of No Importance (1994), for Suri Krishnamma; and The Run of the Country (1995) for Peter Yates.

He had the lead role in Dennis Potter's final two plays, Karaoke (1996) and Cold Lazarus (both 1996). In the latter he played a frozen, disembodied head.[30][31]

Finney did Nostromo (1997) for television, and Washington Square (1997) for Agnieszka Holland then made A Rather English Marriage (1998) with Tom Courtenay.[32] He had support roles in Breakfast of Champions (1999) and Simpatico (1999).

2000s

Finney had his biggest hit in a long while with Erin Brockovich (2000), alongside Julia Roberts for Steven Soderbergh.

Finney had a cameo in Soderbergh's Traffic (2000) and played Ernest Hemmingway in Hemingway, the Hunter of Death (2001) for TV.

He had the lead in Delivering Milo (2001) and in 2002 his critically acclaimed portrayal of Winston Churchill in The Gathering Storm won him British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), Emmy and Golden Globe awards as Best Actor.[25] [33][34]

He also played the title role in the television series My Uncle Silas, based on the short stories by H. E. Bates, about a roguish but lovable poacher-cum-farm labourer looking after his great-nephew. The show ran for two series broadcast in 2001 and 2003.[35]

Finney had a key role in Big Fish (2001) directed by Tim Burton, and did another cameo for Soderbergh in Ocean's Twelve (2004). He sang in Tim Burton's Corpse Bride (2005)[36] and the film of Aspects of Love (2005).

Finney was reunited with Ridley Sccott in A Good Year (2006). He had support roles in Amazing Grace (2006), The Bourne Ultimatum (2007), and Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (2007). His last appearance in a feature was in Skyfall (2012).

Even with his success on the big screen, Finney never abandoned his stage performances. He continued his association with the National Theatre Company at the Old Vic in London, where he performed in the mid-1960s in Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing and Chekhov's The Cherry Orchard.

Theatre

He received Tony Award nominations for Luther (1964) and A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (1968),[25] and also starred on stage in Love for Love, Strindberg's Miss Julie, Black Comedy, The Country Wife, Alpha Beta, Beckett's Krapp's Last Tape, Tamburlaine the Great, Another Time and, his last stage appearance, in 1997, "Art" by Yasmina Reza, which preceded the 1998 Tony Award-winning Broadway run.

He won an Olivier Award for Orphans in 1986 and won three Evening Standard Theatre Awards for Best Actor.[37]

In 1994, Finney played a gay bus conductor in early 1960s Dublin in A Man of No Importance.[38]

A lifelong supporter of Manchester United, Finney narrated the documentary Munich, about the air crash that killed most of the Busby Babes in 1958, which was shown on United's TV channel MUTV in February 2008.[39]

Personal life

With his first wife, Jane Wenham, he had a son,[25] who works in the film industry as a camera operator.[40] From 1970 to 1978, he was married to French actress Anouk Aimée. From 2006 until his death, Finney was married to travel agent Penelope Delmage.[40][25] In May 2011, Finney disclosed that he had been receiving treatment for kidney cancer.[41] According to a 2012 interview he had been diagnosed with kidney cancer in 2007 and underwent surgery, followed by six rounds of chemotherapy.[42]

Death

Finney died from a chest infection on 7 February 2019, at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London, at the age of 82.[43][44][45]

Awards and honours

Albert Finney 1966b
Finney in 1966

Finney turned down the offer of a CBE in 1980, and a knighthood in 2000. He criticised the honours system for "perpetuating snobbery".[46]

He received five Oscar nominations but never won. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor four times, for Tom Jones (1963), Murder on the Orient Express (1974), The Dresser (1983), and Under the Volcano (1984); and once for Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in Erin Brockovich (2000).[25]

Julia Roberts mentioned Finney in her Oscar acceptance speech for Best Actress in Erin Brockovich, calling him a "pleasure to act with".[47]

Finney received 13 BAFTA nominations (nine film, four TV), winning two:[25]

In addition Finney received the BAFTA Academy Fellowship Award in 2001.[48]

He won an Emmy Award, for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Made for TV Movie, for his performance as Winston Churchill in HBO's The Gathering Storm.[34] He had previously been nominated for the HBO telefilm The Image (1990).[49]

He received nine Golden Globe Award nominations, winning three:[50]

  • 1963 Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy for Tom Jones
  • 1963 Most Promising Newcomer (Male) for Tom Jones — Won
  • 1970 Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy for Scrooge — Won
  • 1982 Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama for Shoot the Moon
  • 1983 Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama for The Dresser
  • 1984 Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama for Under the Volcano
  • 2000 Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture for Erin Brockovich
  • 2002 Best Performance by an Actor in a Mini-Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television for The Gathering StormWon
  • 2003 Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture for Big Fish

For his work on Broadway, Finney was nominated for two Tony Awards, both for Best Actor in a Play, for Luther in 1964, and A Day in the Death of Joe Egg in 1968.[25] For the London stage, he won the Laurence Olivier Award, for Best Actor, for Orphans in 1986.[51] He won the Evening Standard Theatre Award for Best Actor three times, for A Flea in Her Ear in 1966, Tamburlaine the Great in 1976 and Orphans in 1986.[52]

Other awards include: a Golden Laurel for his work on Scrooge (1970) and for his work on Tom Jones, for which he was the 3rd Place Winner for the "Top Male Comedy Performance" for 1964. He was honoured by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association as Best Actor for Under the Volcano (which he tied with F. Murray Abraham for Amadeus),[53] the National Board of Review Best Actor award for Saturday Night and Sunday Morning,[54] and the New York Film Critics Circle Best Actor award for Tom Jones.[55]

Finney won two Screen Actors Guild Awards, for Best Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role, for Erin Brockovich, and as a member of the acting ensemble in the film Traffic. He was also nominated for The Gathering Storm, for Best Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries, but did not win.[56][57]

He won the Silver Berlin Bear award for Best Actor, for The Dresser, at the 34th Berlin International Film Festival in 1984.[58]

He won the Volpi Cup for Best Actor, for Tom Jones, at the Venice Film Festival.[59]

Filmography

Film

Year Title Role Notes Ref.
1960 The Entertainer Mick Rice [60]
Saturday Night and Sunday Morning Arthur Seaton BAFTA Award for Most Promising Newcomer to Leading Film Roles
Mar del Plata International Film Festival Award for Best Actor
Nominated – BAFTA Award for Best British Actor
[60]
1963 Tom Jones Tom Jones Golden Globe Award for Most Promising Newcomer – Male
Volpi Cup for Best Actor
Nominated – Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated – BAFTA Award for Best British Actor
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Musical or Comedy
Nominated – Golden Laurel Award for Top Male Comedic Performance
[60]
The Victors Russian Soldier [60]
1964 Night Must Fall Danny [60]
1967 Two for the Road Mark Wallace [60]
1968 Charlie Bubbles Charlie Bubbles Also director[60] [60]
1969 The Picasso Summer George Smith [60]
1970 Scrooge Ebenezer Scrooge Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Musical or Comedy
Nominated – Golden Laurel Award for Top Male Comedic Performance
[60]
1971 Gumshoe Eddie Ginley Nominated – BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role [60]
1974 Alpha Beta Frank Elliot
Murder on the Orient Express Hercule Poirot Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actor
Nominated – Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated – BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role
[60]
1975 The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother Man in opera audience Cameo; uncredited
1977 The Duellists Fouche [61]
1981 Loophole Mike Daniels [60]
Wolfen Dewey Wilson Nominated – Saturn Award for Best Actor [60]
Looker Dr. Larry Roberts [60]
1982 Shoot the Moon George Dunlap Nominated – BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Drama
[60]
Annie Oliver "Daddy" Warbucks [60]
1983 The Dresser Sir Nominated – Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated – BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Drama
Nominated – Silver Berlin Bear for Best Actor
[60]
1984 Under the Volcano Geoffrey Firmin Nominated – Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Drama
Nominated – Joseph Plateau Award for Best Actor
Nominated – National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor
[60]
1987 Orphans Harold [60]
1990 Miller's Crossing Leo O'Bannon [60]
Roger Waters – The Wall – Live in Berlin The Judge [61]
1992 The Playboys Constable Brendan Hegarty [60]
1993 Rich in Love Warren Odom [60]
1994 The Browning Version Andrew Crocker-Harris [60]
A Man of No Importance Alfred Byrne [60]
1995 The Run of the Country Danny's Father
1997 Washington Square Dr. Austin Sloper [60]
1999 Breakfast of Champions Kilgore Trout [60]
Simpatico Simms [60]
2000 Erin Brockovich Ed Masry SAG Award for Outstanding Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role
Nominated – Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor
Nominated – BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor
Nominated – Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actor
[60]
Traffic White House Chief of Staff SAG Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture [60]
2001 Delivering Milo Elmore Dahl
2003 Big Fish Edward Bloom, Sr. Nominated – BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor
Nominated – Saturn Award for Best Actor
[60]
2004 Ocean's Twelve Gaspar LeMarc Uncredited cameo [61]
2005 Corpse Bride Finis Everglot Voice [60]
2006 A Good Year Uncle Henry Skinner [60]
Amazing Grace John Newton [60]
2007 The Bourne Ultimatum Dr. Albert Hirsch [60]
Before the Devil Knows You're Dead Charles Hanson Gotham Independent Film Award for Best Ensemble Performance [60]
2012 The Bourne Legacy Dr. Albert Hirsch [60]
Skyfall Kincade [60]

Television

Year Title Role Notes Ref
1959 Emergency – Ward 10 Tom Fletcher 4 episodes [62]
1984 Pope John Paul II Karol Wojtyła, Pope John Paul II Television movie [63]
1989 The Endless Game Agent, Alec Hillsden TV miniseries (2 episodes) [64]
1990 The Image Jason Cromwell Television movie
Nominated – Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie
[65]
The Green Man Maurice Allington 3 episodes
Nominated – British Academy Television Award for Best Actor
[29]
1996 Karaoke Daniel Feeld 4 episodes
Nominated – British Academy Television Award for Best Actor
[65]
Cold Lazarus [65]
1997 Nostromo Dr. Monygham 4 episodes [66]
1998 A Rather English Marriage Reggie Television movie
Nominated – British Academy Television Award for Best Actor
[32]
2001–03 My Uncle Silas Uncle Silas 9 episodes [65]
2002 The Gathering Storm Winston Churchill Television movie
British Academy Television Award for Best Actor
Broadcasting Press Guild Award for Best Actor
Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film
Nominated – Satellite Award for Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film
Nominated – SAG Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie
[25]

Theatre

Year Title Role Theatre Ref.
1956 Henry V King Henry Birmingham Repertory Theatre
1958 The Party Soya New Theatre
1959 Coriolanus Coriolanus Royal Shakespeare Theatre
1961 Luther Martin Luther Royal Court Theatre
1963 Lunt-Fontanne Theatre [67]
1965 Black Comedy Harold Gorringe Old Vic Theatre
Much Ado About Nothing Don Pedro Old Vic Theatre
1965-1966 Miss Julie Jean Old Vic Theatre [68]
1966 A Flea in Her Ear Victor Emmanuel Chandebise Old Vic Theatre
1968 A Day in the Death of Joe Egg Bri Brooks Atkinson Theatre [69]
1976 Hamlet Prince Hamlet Royal National Theatre
Tamburlaine Tamburlaine
1978 The Cherry Orchard Lopakhin Royal National Theatre
1984 Serjeant Musgrave's Dance Serjeant Musgrave Old Vic Theatre
1986 Orphans Harold Apollo Theatre
1996 'Art' Marc Wyndham's Theatre [70]

Awards and nominations

Year Association Category Nominated work Result Ref
1961 BAFTA Awards Best British Actor Saturday Night and Sunday Morning Nominated [71]
Most Promising Newcomer to Leading Film Roles Won [71]
National Board of Review Best Actor Won [54]
Mar del Plata International Film Festival Best Actor Won [72]
1964 Academy Awards Best Actor Tom Jones Nominated [73]
BAFTA Awards Best British Actor Nominated [74]
Golden Globe Awards Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy Nominated [50]
New Star of the Year – Actor Won [50]
Tony Awards Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play Luther Nominated [75]
1968 A Day in the Death of Joe Egg Nominated [75]
1971 Golden Globe Awards Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy Scrooge Won [50]
1972 BAFTA Awards Best Actor Gumshoe Nominated [76]
1975 Academy Awards Best Actor Murder on the Orient Express Nominated [77]
BAFTA Awards Best Actor Nominated [78]
1976 Olivier Awards Best Actor in a Revival Hamlet and Tamburlaine the Great Nominated [2]
1982 Saturn Awards Best Actor Wolfen Nominated [79]
1983 BAFTA Awards Best Actor Shoot the Moon Nominated [80]
Golden Globe Awards Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama Nominated [81]
1984 Academy Awards Best Actor The Dresser Nominated [82]
Golden Globe Awards Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama Nominated [83]
1985 Academy Awards Best Actor Under the Volcano Nominated [84]
BAFTA Awards Best Actor The Dresser Nominated [85]
Golden Globe Awards Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama Under the Volcano Nominated [86]
London Film Critics' Circle Awards Actor of the Year Won [87]
1986 Olivier Awards Best Actor Orphans Won [51]
1990 Primetime Emmy Awards Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie The Image Nominated [49]
1991 BAFTA TV Awards Best Actor on Television The Green Man Nominated [88]
1994 Boston Society of Film Critics Awards Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor The Browning Version Won [89]
1997 BAFTA TV Awards Best Actor on Television Cold Lazarus Nominated [90]
Karaoke Nominated [90]
1999 A Rather English Marriage Nominated [91]
2000 Boston Society of Film Critics Awards Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actor Erin Brockovich Nominated [92]
2001 Academy Awards Best Supporting Actor Nominated [93]
BAFTA Awards Best Actor in a Supporting Role Nominated [94]
Blockbuster Entertainment Awards Favorite Supporting Actor – Drama Nominated [95]
Chicago Film Critics Association Awards Best Supporting Actor Nominated [96]
Golden Globe Awards Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture Nominated [97]
London Film Critics' Circle Awards British Supporting Actor of the Year Won [98]
Online Film Critics Society Awards Best Supporting Actor Nominated [99]
Satellite Awards Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture Nominated [100]
Screen Actors Guild Awards Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture Traffic Won [57]
Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role Erin Brockovich Won [57]
2002 Primetime Emmy Awards Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie The Gathering Storm Won [34]
2003 BAFTA TV Awards Best Actor on Television Won [101]
Broadcasting Press Guild Awards Best Actor Won [102]
Golden Globe Awards Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film Won [103]
Satellite Awards Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film Nominated [104]
Screen Actors Guild Awards Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie Nominated [56]
2004 BAFTA Awards Best Actor in a Supporting Role Big Fish Nominated [105]
Golden Globe Awards Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture Nominated [106]
Saturn Awards Best Actor Nominated [107]
2007 Gotham Awards Best Ensemble Cast Before the Devil Knows You're Dead Won [108]
2008 Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards Best Cast Nominated [109]
London Film Critics' Circle Awards British Supporting Actor of the Year Nominated [110]

References

  1. ^ "Albert Finney Biography". filmreference.com. Archived from the original on 26 December 2008. Retrieved 2 April 2013.
  2. ^ a b Quentin Falk (1993). Albert Finney in Character: A Biography. Robson Books. ISBN 978-0-86051-823-5.
  3. ^ "Goldsmith Televised". The Stage (3900). 12 January 1956. p. 12. Retrieved 10 February 2019 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).
  4. ^ "She Stoops to Conquer: Part 1". The Radio Times (1677). 30 December 1955. p. 44. ISSN 0033-8060. Retrieved 10 February 2019.
  5. ^ Quentin Falk – Albert Finney in Character: A Biography – 1992, page 23 "This was Fernald's production of Ian Dallas's The Face of Love, a modern-dress version of Troilus and Cressida."
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i FINNEY COMES BACK TO FILM Farber, Stephen. New York Times 26 July 1981: A.1.
  7. ^ WIFESUES ALBERT FINNEY The Guardian 7 July 1961: 19.
  8. ^ Laurence Olivier, Confessions of an Actor, Orion, 1994, p. 243
  9. ^ Tino Balio, United Artists: The Company That Changed the Film Industry, University of Wisconsin Press, 1987 p. 239
  10. ^ Finney: A Star Who Hides His Magnitude: Albert Finney Marks, Sally K. Los Angeles Times 23 Apr 1967: c11.
  11. ^ "David Lean" by Stephen M. Silverman (Abrams, New York, 1992)
  12. ^ Taubman, Howard. "Theater: 'Luther' Stars Albert Finney; John Osborne Drama Is at the St. James". The New York Times. Retrieved 9 February 2019.
  13. ^ "Luther to end its run next month", The Times, 16 February 1962, p. 15
  14. ^ "Most Popular Films Of 1963." Times [London, England] 3 January 1964: 4. The Times Digital Archive. Web. 11 July 2012.
  15. ^ a b ALBERT FINNEY The Guardian 15 Mar 1972: 10.
  16. ^ Albert Finney to Appear Here In 'Joe Egg,' a London Success: Simon Sells "Plaza Suite" Don't Drink" Will Move By SAM ZOLOTOW. New York Times 12 Dec 1967: 57.
  17. ^ MOVIE CALL SHEET: 'Charlie' Next Film for Liza Martin, Betty. Los Angeles Times 21 Oct 1966: C16.
  18. ^ Finney's fondness for the good life Gritten, David. The Ottawa Citizen 21 Apr 2000: A14.
  19. ^ Hughes, David (28 December 2018). "Poirot actors: from David Suchet to Kenneth Branagh, the stars who've played Agatha Christie's sleuth". The Independent.
  20. ^ Sanders, Dennis and Len Lovallo. The Agatha Christie Companion: The Complete Guide to Agatha Christie's Life and Work, (1984), pgs. 438–441. Subscription required ISBN 978-0425118450
  21. ^ News of the Screen: ' Sugarland' Team For 'Clearwater' 5 Adaptations Set In Theater Series Finney to Direct Comedy on Lunacy By A. H. WEILER. New York Times 12 May 1974: 49.
  22. ^ WHITHER ALBERT FINNEY?: From Manchester to Motown Christon, Lawrence. Los Angeles Times 18 July 1977: f1.
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Further reading

  • Hershman, Gabriel. Strolling Player – The Life and Career of Albert Finney The History Press, 2017, ISBN 9780750978866

External links

A Man of No Importance (film)

A Man of No Importance is a 1994 comedy drama film directed by Suri Krishnamma and starring Albert Finney.

Before the Devil Knows You're Dead

Before the Devil Knows You're Dead is a 2007 American crime drama film directed by Sidney Lumet, his last feature film before his death in 2011. The film was written by Kelly Masterson, and stars Philip Seymour Hoffman, Ethan Hawke, Marisa Tomei and Albert Finney. The title comes from the Irish saying: "May you be in heaven a full half-hour before the devil knows you're dead". The film unfolds non-linearly, repeatedly going back and forth in time, with some scenes shown from various points of view.

The film appeared on 21 critics' end-of-the-year top ten lists indexed by Metacritic and was selected as one of 2007's ten most influential American films by the American Film Institute at the 2007 AFI Awards.

Big Fish

Big Fish is a 2003 American fantasy comedy-drama film based on the 1998 novel of the same name by Daniel Wallace. The film was directed by Tim Burton and stars Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup, Jessica Lange, and Marion Cotillard. Other roles are performed by Steve Buscemi, Helena Bonham Carter, Matthew McGrory, Alison Lohman, and Danny DeVito among others.

Edward Bloom (Finney), a former traveling salesman in the Southern United States with a gift for storytelling, is now confined to his deathbed. Will (Crudup), his estranged son, attempts to mend their relationship as Bloom relates tall tales of his eventful life as a young adult (portrayed by McGregor in the flashback scenes).

Screenwriter John August read a manuscript of the novel six months before it was published and convinced Columbia Pictures to acquire the rights. August began adapting the novel while producers negotiated with Steven Spielberg who planned to direct after finishing Minority Report (2002). Spielberg considered Jack Nicholson for the role of Edward Bloom, but eventually dropped the project to focus on Catch Me If You Can (2002). Tim Burton and Richard D. Zanuck took over after completing Planet of the Apes (2001) and brought Ewan McGregor and Albert Finney on board.

The film's theme of reconciliation between a dying father and his son had special significance for Burton, as his father had died in 2000 and his mother in 2002, a month before he signed on to direct. Big Fish was shot on location in Alabama in a series of fairy tale vignettes evoking the tone of a Southern Gothic fantasy. The film received award nominations in multiple film categories, including four Golden Globe Award nominations, seven nominations from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, two Saturn Award nominations, and an Oscar and a Grammy Award nomination for Danny Elfman's original score.

Charlie Bubbles

Charlie Bubbles is a 1968 British comedy-drama film starring Billie Whitelaw and Albert Finney, and also featuring Liza Minnelli. It was screened at the 1968 Cannes Film Festival on the 11th, just before the festival was called off due to the events of May 1968 in France.

The film made great play of its Manchester setting, contrasting the return of its eponymous lead character, played by Finney, to his home city after achieving success as a writer in London. During his return, he visits his former wife, played by Whitelaw, in Derbyshire, and watches a Manchester United match at Old Trafford (featuring footage of Bobby Charlton and Denis Law) with his son. They are cut off from the outside world in a glass-fronted box as they watch the match. Finney's character is bored with his success and his privileged position, which allows him to indulge himself in most ways he wishes. One of these is a relationship with his secretary Eliza, played by Minnelli.

Jane Wenham (actress)

Ann Jane Wenham Figgins (26 November 1927 – 15 November 2018), known professionally as Jane Wenham, was an English actress born in Southampton, Hampshire.

Wenham made her film debut in the adaptation of J. B. Priestley's An Inspector Calls (1954). From 1957 to 1961 she was married to the actor Albert Finney, with whom she had a son, Simon, who is a cameraman.

Wenham died in November 2018, eleven days before her 91st birthday.

Miller's Crossing

Miller's Crossing is a 1990 American neo-noir gangster film written, directed and produced by the Coen brothers and starring Gabriel Byrne, Marcia Gay Harden, John Turturro, Jon Polito, J. E. Freeman, and Albert Finney. The plot concerns a power struggle between two rival gangs and how the protagonist, Tom Reagan (Byrne), plays both sides off against each other.

In 2005, Time chose Miller's Crossing as one of the 100 greatest films made since the inception of the periodical. Time critic Richard Corliss called it a "noir with a touch so light, the film seems to float on the breeze like the frisbee of a fedora sailing through the forest".

Murder on the Orient Express (1974 film)

Murder on the Orient Express is a 1974 British mystery film directed by Sidney Lumet, produced by John Brabourne and Richard B. Goodwin, and based on the 1934 novel of the same name by Agatha Christie.

The film features the Belgian detective Hercule Poirot (Albert Finney), who is asked to investigate the murder of an American business tycoon aboard the Orient Express train. The suspects are portrayed by a notably all-star cast, including Lauren Bacall, Ingrid Bergman, Sean Connery, John Gielgud, Vanessa Redgrave, Michael York, Jacqueline Bisset, Anthony Perkins and Wendy Hiller. The screenplay is by Paul Dehn as well as an uncredited Anthony Shaffer.The film was commercially and critically well-received, as well as receiving six nominations at the 47th Academy Awards: Best Actor (Finney), Best Supporting Actress (Bergman), Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Original Score, Best Cinematography, and Best Costume Design. Of these nominations, Bergman was the only winner.

Nostromo (TV serial)

Nostromo is a 1997 British-Italian television drama miniseries directed by Alastair Reid and produced by Fernando Ghia of Pixit Productions, a co-production with Radiotelevisione Italiana, Televisión Española, and WGBH Boston. The music is composed by Ennio Morricone. It stars Claudio Amendola, Paul Brooke, Lothaire Bluteau, Claudia Cardinale, Colin Firth and Albert Finney. It is described as "an adaptation of Joseph Conrad's epic story Nostromo of political upheaval, greed and romance in turn-of-the-20th-century South America."

Rich in Love

Rich in Love is a 1992 drama film directed by Bruce Beresford and starring Albert Finney, Kathryn Erbe, Kyle MacLachlan, Jill Clayburgh, Suzy Amis, and Ethan Hawke. It is based on the 1987 novel Rich in Love by Josephine Humphreys.

Scrooge (1970 film)

Scrooge is a 1970 British musical film adaptation in Panavision of Charles Dickens' 1843 story A Christmas Carol. It was filmed in London between January and May 1970 and directed by Ronald Neame, and starred Albert Finney as Ebenezer Scrooge. The film's score was composed by Leslie Bricusse and arranged and conducted by Ian Fraser. With eleven musical arrangements interspersed throughout, the award-winning motion picture is a faithful musical retelling of the original.

Albert Finney won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor in a Musical/Comedy in 1971. The film received four Academy Award nominations, including for Best Original Song for "Thank You Very Much".

The Browning Version (1994 film)

The Browning Version is a 1994 film directed by Mike Figgis and starring Albert Finney, Greta Scacchi and Matthew Modine. The film is based on the 1948 play by Terence Rattigan, which was previously adapted for film under the same name in 1951.

The Dresser (1983 film)

The Dresser is a 1983 British drama film, with a screenplay by Ronald Harwood, based on his 1980 play The Dresser. It tells the story of an aging actor's personal assistant, who struggles to keep his charge's life together. The film was directed by Peter Yates and produced by Yates with Ronald Harwood. Cinematography was by Kelvin Pike. It stars Albert Finney, Tom Courtenay, Zena Walker, Eileen Atkins, Michael Gough, and Edward Fox. Finney and Courtenay were both nominated for Academy Awards, BAFTA Awards, and Golden Globe Awards for their performances, with Courtenay winning the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama in a tie with Robert Duvall in Tender Mercies.

The Gathering Storm (2002 film)

The Gathering Storm is a BBC–HBO co-produced television biographical film about Winston Churchill in the years just prior to World War II. The title of the film is that of the first volume of Churchill's largely autobiographical six-volume history of the war, which covered the period from 1919 to 3 September 1939, the day he became First Lord of the Admiralty.

The film, directed by Richard Loncraine and written by Larry Ramin and Hugh Whitemore, stars Albert Finney as Churchill and Vanessa Redgrave as his wife Clementine Churchill ("Clemmie"). The film also features a supporting cast of British actors such as Derek Jacobi, Ronnie Barker, Jim Broadbent, Tom Wilkinson, Celia Imrie, Linus Roache and Hugh Bonneville, and is notable for an early appearance by a young Tom Hiddleston. Lena Headey, Simon Williams, and Edward Hardwicke all make brief appearances amongst the supporting cast. Among the film's executive producers were Ridley Scott and Tony Scott.

Finney gained many accolades for his performance, winning both a BAFTA Award for Best Actor and an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actor. Ramin and Whitemore won the Emmy for Outstanding Writing. It won a Peabody Award in 2002 for being "a portrait of a 20th Century hero’s return from political obscurity to direct the destiny of a nation." In 2016, Mark Lawson of The Guardian ranked it as the most memorable television portrayal of Churchill. A sequel, Into the Storm, was released in 2009, with Churchill portrayed by Brendan Gleeson, which focuses on the prime minister's days in office during World War II.

The Image (1990 film)

The Image is a 1990 American drama film directed by Peter Werner and written by Brian Rehak. The film stars Albert Finney, John Mahoney, Kathy Baker, Swoosie Kurtz, Marsha Mason and Spalding Gray. The film premiered on HBO on January 27, 1990. It was nominated for two Primetime Emmy Awards, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Special for Finney and Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Special for Kurtz.

The Picasso Summer

The Picasso Summer is a 1969 drama directed by Serge Bourguignon and Robert Sallin, starring Albert Finney and Yvette Mimieux. The screenplay was written by Ray Bradbury (using the pseudonym of Douglas Spaulding) based upon his short story, "In a Season of Calm Weather."Future Academy Award winner Vilmos Zsigmond was the cinematographer. There were two directors. Serge Bourguignon was the original director whose rough cut was rejected by Warner Bros.. Another director, Robert Sallin, was hired to reshoot some scenes and to do the changed ending. Even with the reworked scenes, the movie was never released to theaters in the United States. It was sold for distribution to TV networks and stations with Sallin receiving the director's credit.

The Run of the Country

The Run of the Country is a 1995 American romantic drama film directed by Peter Yates. It is based on the novel by Shane Connaughton, and stars Albert Finney and Matt Keeslar.

Tom Jones (1963 film)

Tom Jones is a 1963 British adventure-comedy film, an adaptation of Henry Fielding's classic novel The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling (1749), starring Albert Finney as the titular hero. It was one of the most critically acclaimed and popular comedies of its time, winning four Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The film was directed by Tony Richardson and the screenplay was adapted by playwright John Osborne. The film has an unusual comic style: the opening sequence is performed in the manner of a silent film, and characters sometimes break the fourth wall, often by looking directly into the camera and addressing the audience, and going so far as to have the character of Tom Jones suddenly appearing to notice the camera and covering the lens with his hat. Another unusual feature of the movie is the presence of an unseen narrator voiced by Micheál Mac Liammóir. Mock-serious commentaries between certain scenes deplore the action of several characters as well as the weaknesses in the human character and provides a poetic denouement for the movie.

Tom Jones was a success both critically and at the box-office. At the 36th Academy Awards, it was nominated for ten Oscars, winning four: Best Picture, Best Director for Richardson, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Original Score. It also won two Golden Globe Awards including Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy, and three BAFTA Awards including Best Film and Best British Film.

In 1999 the British Film Institute named it the 51st greatest British film of the 20th Century.

Two for the Road (film)

Two for the Road is a 1967 British romantic comedy-drama film directed by Stanley Donen and starring Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney. Written by Frederic Raphael, the film is about a husband and wife who examine their twelve-year relationship while on a road trip to Southern France. The film was considered somewhat experimental for its time because the story is told in a non-linear fashion, with scenes from the latter stages of the relationship juxtaposed with those from its beginning, often leaving the viewer to interpolate what has intervened, which is sometimes revealed in later scenes. Several locations are used in different segments to show continuity throughout the twelve-year period.

Raphael received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay, Hepburn received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actress – Motion Picture Comedy or Musical, and Henry Mancini received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Original Score. The film's theme song, "Two for the Road", was composed by Mancini, who wrote many notable theme songs for films, including "Moon River" for Breakfast at Tiffany's. He considered "Two for the Road" his favourite of all the songs he wrote.

Cars featured in the film, being driven by the couple or ridden in by them, include a white Mercedes-Benz 230SL roadster, an MG TD, a Triumph Herald, an Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint coupé, VW Microbus, and a Ford Country Squire; the cars are often used to re-establish the time period after a jump. In one scene of this movie, Audrey Hepburn appears dressed in a shiny black PVC trouser suit designed by Paco Rabanne. The film was ranked #57 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years... 100 Passions list.

Under the Volcano (film)

Under the Volcano is a 1984 film directed by John Huston, written by Guy Gallo, and starring Albert Finney, Jacqueline Bisset, Anthony Andrews, and Katy Jurado. The film received Academy Award nominations for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Albert Finney) and Best Original Score (Alex North).

It is based on the semi-autobiographical 1947 novel by English writer Malcolm Lowry. The film tells the story of Geoffrey Firmin, an alcoholic British former consul in the small Mexican town of Quauhnahuac on the Day of the Dead in 1938.

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