Aladdin

Aladdin (/əˈlædɪn/; Arabic: علاء الدين‎, ʻAlāʼ ud-Dīn/ ʻAlāʼ ad-Dīn, IPA: [ʕalaːʔ adˈdiːn]) is a folk tale of Middle Eastern origin. It is one of the tales in The Book of One Thousand and One Nights (The Arabian Nights), and one of the best known—despite not being part of the original Arabic text. It was added to the collection in the 18th century by the Frenchman Antoine Galland, who attributed the tale to a Syrian storyteller, Youhenna Diab.

Since it first appeared in the early 18th century "Aladdin and the Magic Lamp" has been one of the best known and most retold of all fairy tales.

Aladdin in the Magic Garden - Project Gutenberg eText 14221
Aladdin in the Magic Garden, an illustration by Max Liebert from Ludwig Fulda's Aladin und die Wunderlampe[1]

Plot summary

Robida - Aladin illustration page1.jpeg
The Sorcerer traps Aladdin in the magic cave.

The story is often "re-told" with variations—the following is a precis of the Burton translation of 1885.[2]

Aladdin is an impoverished young ne'er-do-well, dwelling in "one of the cities of China". He is recruited by a sorcerer from the Maghreb, who passes himself off as the brother of Aladdin's late father, Mustapha the tailor, convincing Aladdin and his mother of his good will by pretending to set up the lad as a wealthy merchant. The sorcerer's real motive is to persuade young Aladdin to retrieve a wonderful oil lamp from a booby-trapped magic cave. After the sorcerer attempts to double-cross him, Aladdin finds himself trapped in the cave. Aladdin is still wearing a magic ring the sorcerer has lent him. When he rubs his hands in despair, he inadvertently rubs the ring and a jinnī (or "genie") appears who releases him from the cave so that he can return to his mother—still carrying the lamp. When his mother tries to clean the lamp, so they can sell it to buy food for their supper, a second far more powerful genie appears who is bound to do the bidding of the person holding the lamp.

With the aid of the genie of the lamp, Aladdin becomes rich and powerful and marries Princess Badroulbadour, the sultan's daughter (after magically foiling her marriage to the vizier's son). The genie builds Aladdin and his bride a wonderful palace, far more magnificent than the sultan's.

The sorcerer hears of Aladdin's good fortune, and returns; he gets his hands on the lamp by tricking Aladdin's wife (who is unaware of the lamp's importance) by offering to exchange "new lamps for old". He orders the genie of the lamp to take the palace, along with all its contents, to his home in the Maghreb. Aladdin still has the magic ring and is able to summon the lesser genie. The genie of the ring cannot directly undo any of the magic of the genie of the lamp, but he is able to transport Aladdin to the Maghreb where, with the help of the "woman's wiles" of the princess he recovers the lamp and slays the sorcerer, returning the palace to its proper place.

The sorcerer's more powerful and evil brother plots to destroy Aladdin for killing his brother by disguising himself as an old woman known for her healing powers. Badroulbadour falls for his disguise and commands the "woman" to stay in her palace in case of any illnesses. Aladdin is warned of this danger by the genie of the lamp and slays the imposter. Everyone lives happily ever after, Aladdin eventually succeeding to his father-in-law's throne.

Sources

Known along with Ali Baba as one of the "orphan tales", the story was not part of the original Nights collection and has no authentic Arabic source, but was incorporated into the book Les mille et une nuits by its French translator, Antoine Galland.[3]

John Payne quotes passages from Galland's unpublished diary: recording Galland's encounter with a Maronite Syrian scholar from Aleppo, Youhenna Diab. According to Galland's diary for March 25, 1709, he met the man he called "Hanna", who had travelled from Aleppo to Paris with Paul Lucas, a celebrated French traveller. Galland's diary reports that his translation of the Arabic version of "Aladdin" into French, was first made in the winter of 1709–10. It was included in his volumes ix and x of the Nights, published in 1710. Payne also records the discovery in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris of two Arabic manuscripts containing Aladdin (with two more of the "interpolated" tales). One was written by a Syrian Christian priest living in Paris, named Dionysios Shawish, alias Dom Denis Chavis. The other is supposed to be a copy Mikhail Sabbagh made of a manuscript written in Baghdad in 1703. It was purchased by the Bibliothèque Nationale at the end of the nineteenth century.[4]

As part of his work on the first critical edition of the Nights, Iraq's Muhsin Mahdi has shown[5] that both these manuscripts are forgeries—"back-translations" of Galland's text into Arabic.[6][7]

Setting

The opening sentences of the story, in both the Galland and the Burton versions, set it in China and imply, at least, that Aladdin is Chinese.[8] On the other hand, there is practically nothing in the rest of the story that is inconsistent with an Arabian or Middle Eastern setting. For instance, the Sultan is referred to as such rather than being called the "Emperor", as in some re-tellings, and the people in the story are Muslims: their conversation is larded with devout Muslim platitudes. A Jewish merchant buys Aladdin's wares (and incidentally cheats him), but there is no mention of Buddhists or Confucians (or other distinctively Han Chinese people).

China's ethnic makeup has long included Muslim groups, including large populations of the Hui people whose origins go back to Silk Road travellers. In addition, large communities of Muslim Chinese have been known since the Tang Dynasty, as well as Jewish communities. Some have even suggested that the intended setting may be Turkestan (encompassing Central Asia and the modern Chinese province of Xinjiang).[9]

For all this, speculation about a "real" Chinese setting depends on a knowledge of China that the teller of a folk tale (as opposed to a geographic expert) might well not possess.[10]

Adaptations

Adaptations vary in their faithfulness to the original story. In particular, difficulties with the Chinese setting are sometimes resolved by giving the story a more typical Arabian Nights background.

Books

  • One of the many literary retellings of the tale appears in A Book of Wizards (1966) and A Choice of Magic (1971), by Ruth Manning-Sanders.
  • "The Nobility of Faith" by Jonathan Clements in the anthology Doctor Who Short Trips: The Ghosts of Christmas (2007) is a retelling of the Aladdin story in the style of the Arabian Nights, but featuring the Doctor in the role of the genie.

Pantomimes

He's behind you
An 1886 theatre poster advertising a production of the pantomime Aladdin.

In the United Kingdom, the story of Aladdin was dramatised in 1788 by John O'Keefe for the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden.[11] It has been a popular subject for pantomime for over 200 years.[12]

The traditional Aladdin pantomime is the source of the well-known pantomime character Widow Twankey (Aladdin's mother). In pantomime versions, changes in the setting and story are often made to fit it better into "China" (albeit a China situated in the East End of London rather than Medieval Baghdad), and elements of other Arabian Nights tales (in particular Ali Baba) are often introduced into the plot. One version of the "pantomime Aladdin" is Sandy Wilson's musical Aladdin, from 1979.

Since the early 1990s Aladdin pantomimes have tended to be influenced by the Disney animation. For instance, the 2007/8 production at the Birmingham Hippodrome starring John Barrowman featured songs from the Disney movies Aladdin and Mulan.

Other musical theatre

Victoria Disraeli cartoon
New Crowns for Old, a 19th-century British cartoon based on the Aladdin story (Disraeli as Abanazer from the pantomime version of Aladdin offering Queen Victoria an Imperial crown (of India) in exchange for a Royal one)

Films

Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp (1917)

Animated

  • The 1926 animated film The Adventures of Prince Achmed (the earliest surviving animated feature film) combined the story of Aladdin with that of the prince. In this version the princess Aladdin pursues is Achmed's sister and the sorcerer is his rival for her hand. The sorcerer steals the castle and the princess through his own magic and then sets a monster to attack Aladdin, from which Achmed rescues him. Achmed then informs Aladdin he requires the lamp to rescue his own intended wife, Princess Pari Banou, from the demons of the Island of Wak Wak. They convince the Witch of the Fiery Mountain to defeat the sorcerer, and then all three heroes join forces to battle the demons.
  • Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp is a 1939 Popeye the Sailor cartoon.
  • The 1959 animated film 1001 Arabian Nights starring Mr. Magoo as Aladdin's uncle and produced by UPA.
  • The animated feature Aladdin et la lampe merveilleuse by Film Jean Image was released in 1970 in France.[16] The story contains many of the original elements of the story as compared to the Disney version.
  • Aladdin and the Magic Lamp was a rendition in Japanese directed by Yoshikatsu Kasai, produced in Japan by Toei Animation and released in United States by The Samuel Goldwyn Company in 1982.
  • Aladdin, the 1992 animated feature by Walt Disney Feature Animation (possibly currently the best known re-telling of the story). In this version several characters are renamed or amalgamated. For instance the Sorcerer and the Sultan's vizier become one character named Jafar while the Princess is re-named Jasmine). They have new motivations for their actions and the Genie of the Lamp only grants three wishes and desires freedom from his role. Other characters are simply replaced. For example a magic carpet fills the place of the Ring Genie in the plot while a royal magic ring is used by Jafar to find Aladdin). Names from and elements of the 1940 live-action The Thief of Bagdad are borrowed (for instance, the names Jafar and Abu and the Sultan's delight in toys. Also, the physical appearances of the Sultan and Jafar greatly resemble their counterparts in the 1940 film). The setting is moved from China to the fictional Arabian city of Agrabah and the structure of the plot is simplified.
  • Aladdin by Golden Films was released directly on video in 1992.

Live action

  • Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp (1917), directed by Chester M. Franklin and Sidney A. Franklin and released by the Fox Film Corporation, told the story using child actors.[17][18][19]
  • The 1940 British movie The Thief of Bagdad borrows elements of the Aladdin story, although it also departs from the original story fairly freely: for instance the genie grants only three wishes and the minor character of the Emperor's vizier is renamed Jaffar and becomes the main villain, replacing the sorcerer from the original plot.
  • A Thousand and One Nights (1945) is a tongue-in-cheek Technicolor fantasy film set in the Baghdad of the One Thousand and One Nights, starring Cornel Wilde as Aladdin, Evelyn Keyes as the genie of the magic lamp, Phil Silvers as Aladdin's larcenous sidekick, and Adele Jergens as the princess Aladdin loves.
  • In 1957, the story of Aladdin was produced as a movie in Telugu entitled Allauddin Adhbhuta Deepam,[20] Tamil Allavudeenum Arputha Vilakkum[21] and Hindi Alladdin Ka Chirag.[22] They were directed by T. R. Raghunath and produced by T. S. Balaiah.
  • In the 1960s Bollywood produced Aladdin and Sinbad, very loosely based on the original, in which the two named heroes get to meet and share in each other's adventures. In this version, the lamp's jinni (genie) is female and Aladdin marries her rather than the princess (she becomes a mortal woman for his sake).
  • A Soviet film Volshebnaia Lampa Aladdina ("Aladdin's Magic Lamp") was released in 1966.
  • A 1967 TV movie was based on the Prince Street Players stage musical.[23]
  • A Malayalam film Allauddinum Albhutha Vilakkum was made in 1979. This film was remade in Tamil as Allaudinaum Arputha Vilakkum the same year.
  • Gary Wong and Rob Robson produced Aladdin the Rock Panto in 1985.
  • In 1986, an Italian-American co-production (under supervision of Golan-Globus) of a modern-day Aladdin was filmed in Miami under the title Superfantagenio, starring actor Bud Spencer as the genie and his daughter Diamante as the daughter of a police sergeant.
  • A 1990 TV movie was based on the Prince Street Players stage musical.[24]
  • 2009 saw the release of the Hindi Bollywood retelling in the film Aladin.
  • The New Adventures of Aladdin, France modern retelling of the tale of Aladin.
  • Ashchorjyo Prodeep, a 2013 Bengali film based on the same story of a middle class man (played by Saswata Chatterjee) who accidentally finds a magic lamp containing a Jinn (played by Rajatava Dutta). This Anik Dutta film is based on a Shirshendu Mukhopadhyay novel of the same name and deals with the issues of consumerism.
  • Syfy released a made-for-TV horror adaptation called Aladdin and the Death Lamp on September 15, 2012.[25]
  • Aladin Saha Puduma Pahana was released in 2018 in Sri Lanka in Sinhala language.[26]
  • Aladdin, an upcoming Disney live-action remake of the 1992 animated film.

Television

Comics

  • In 1962 the Italian branch of Walt Disney Productions published the story Paperino e la grotta di Aladino (Donald and Aladdin's Cave), written by Osvaldo Pavese and drawn by Pier Lorenzo De Vita. As in many pantomimes, the plot is combined with elements of the Ali Baba story: Uncle Scrooge leads Donald Duck and their nephews on an expedition to find the treasure of Aladdin and they encounter the Middle Eastern counterparts of the Beagle Boys. Scrooge describes Aladdin as a brigand who used the legend of the lamp to cover the origins of his ill-gotten gains. They find the cave holding the treasure—blocked by a huge rock requiring a magic password ("open sesame") to open.[27]

Manga

  • The Japanese manga series Magi is not a direct adaptation, but features Aladdin as the main character of the story and includes many characters from other One Thousand and One Nights stories. An adaptation of this comic to animation was made in October 2012.

Video games

Pachinko

Gallery

Robida Aladin illustration page4.jpeg

Aladdin trades the silver plates to a Jew for a piece of gold

Robida Aladin illustration page11.jpeg

The Sorcerer tricks a handmaiden and offers "new lamps for old lamps".

Aladdinlookingup

Aladdin in Disney's stage show.

See also

References

  1. ^ Aladdin at Project Gutenberg
  2. ^ Burton (2009) pp. 1 ff
  3. ^ Allen (2005) pp.280–
  4. ^ Payne (1901) pp. 13-15
  5. ^ Irwin (1994) pp. 57-58
  6. ^ Mahdi (1994) pp. 51-71
  7. ^ Dobie (2008) p.36
  8. ^ Plotz (2001) p. 148–149
  9. ^ Moon (2005) p. 23
  10. ^ Honour (1973) - Section I "The Imaginary Continent"
  11. ^ Witchard (2017)
  12. ^ "Aladdin". Archived from the original on 5 February 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-22.
  13. ^ "Cole Porter / Aladdin (London Stage Production)". Sondheim Guide. Retrieved 11 January 2019.
  14. ^ Slater, Shawn (9 September 2015). "All New 'Frozen'-Inspired Stage Musical Coming to Disney California Adventure Park in 2016". Disney Parks Blog. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  15. ^ MTIshows.com Music Theatre International
  16. ^ Aladdin et la lampe merveilleuse on IMDb
  17. ^ "Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp". Letterboxd. Retrieved 8 September 2017.
  18. ^ The Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Catalog:Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp
  19. ^ "Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved 8 September 2017.
  20. ^ Allauddin Adhbhuta Deepam on IMDb
  21. ^ Allavudeenum Arputha Vilakkum on IMDb
  22. ^ Alladdin Ka Chirag on IMDb
  23. ^ Aladdin on IMDb
  24. ^ Aladdin on IMDb
  25. ^ Aladdin and the Death Lamp on IMDb
  26. ^ "Dhananjaya became Aladin". Sarasaviya. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  27. ^ Profile of Paperino e la grotta di Aladino
  28. ^ "Aladin et la Lampe Merveilleuse PC, Mac | 2010". Planete Jeu (in French). Retrieved 11 January 2019.
  29. ^ Beyond Expectations: Integrated Report (PDF). Sega Sammy Holdings. 2017. pp. 24 & 71.

Bibliography

Further reading

  • Haddawy, Husain (2008). The Arabian Nights. W. W. Norton & Company. ISBN 978-0393331660.
  • Nun, Katalin; Stewart, Dr Jon (2014). Volume 16, Tome I: Kierkegaard's Literary Figures and Motifs: Agamemnon to Guadalquivir. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd. ISBN 9781472441362.

External links

A Whole New World

"A Whole New World" is a song from Disney's 1992 animated feature film Aladdin, with music by Alan Menken and lyrics by Tim Rice. A duet originally recorded by singers Brad Kane and Lea Salonga in their respective roles as the singing voices of the main characters Aladdin and Jasmine, the ballad serves as both the film's love and theme song. Lyrically, "A Whole New World" describes Aladdin showing the confined princess a life of freedom and the pair's acknowledgment of their love for each other while riding on a magic carpet. The song garnered an Academy Award for Best Original Song at the 65th Academy Awards. "A Whole New World" also won the Grammy Award for Song of the Year at the 36th Annual Grammy Awards, the first and so far only Disney song to win in the category. In 2014, Adam Jacobs and Courtney Reed performed the song as Aladdin and Jasmine in the film's Broadway adaptation.

A single version of the song was released that same year and was performed by American recording artists Peabo Bryson and Regina Belle. This version is played over the film's end credits and is referred on the soundtrack as "Aladdin's Theme". The version peaked at number one on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart on March 6, 1993, replacing Whitney Houston's "I Will Always Love You", which had spent a then-record 14 weeks at the top of the chart. It went gold and sold 600,000 copies domestically. The track peaked at number 12 in the UK Singles Chart in 1992. The song is the first and so far only song from a Disney animated film to top the US Billboard Hot 100. The single version was later included on Belle's studio album Passion (1993) and on Bryson's studio album Through the Fire (1994).

Aladdin (1992 Disney film)

Aladdin is a 1992 American animated musical fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The film is the 31st Disney animated feature film, and was the fourth produced during the Disney film era known as the Disney Renaissance. It was produced and directed by Ron Clements and John Musker, and is based on the Arabic folktale of the same name from One Thousand and One Nights and the French interpretation by Antoine Galland. The voice cast features Scott Weinger, Robin Williams, Linda Larkin, Jonathan Freeman, Frank Welker, Gilbert Gottfried and Douglas Seale. The film follows Aladdin, an Arabian street urchin, who finds a magic lamp containing a genie. In order to hide the lamp from the Grand vizier, he disguises himself as a wealthy prince, and tries to impress the Sultan and his daughter.

Lyricist Howard Ashman first pitched the idea, and the screenplay went through three drafts before then-Disney Studios president Jeffrey Katzenberg agreed to its production. The animators based their designs on the work of caricaturist Al Hirschfeld, and computers were used for both finishing the artwork and creating some animated elements. The musical score was written by Alan Menken and features six songs with lyrics written by both Ashman and Tim Rice, who took over after Ashman's death.

Aladdin was released on November 25, 1992, to critical and commercial success, becoming the highest-grossing film of 1992 with an earn of over $504 million in worldwide box office revenue. Upon release, it became the first animated feature to reach the half–billion dollar mark, and was the highest-grossing animated film of all time until it was surpassed by The Lion King. Aladdin garnered two Academy Awards, as well as other accolades for its soundtrack which had the first and only number from a Disney feature to earn a Grammy Award for Song of the Year for the film's theme song. The film's home video VHS release also set a sales record and grossed about $500 million in the United States. Aladdin's success led to various derived works and other material inspired by the film, including two direct-to-video sequels, The Return of Jafar (1994) and Aladdin and the King of Thieves (1996); an animated television series of the same name; and a Broadway adaptation. A live-action film adaptation directed by Guy Ritchie is set to be released on May 24, 2019.

Aladdin (2011 musical)

Aladdin is a musical based on the 1992 Disney animated film of the same name with a book by Chad Beguelin, music by Alan Menken and lyrics by Howard Ashman, Tim Rice and Beguelin. It resurrects three songs written by Menken and Ashman for the film but not used, and adds four songs written by Menken and Beguelin.

Set in the fictional Arabian city of Agrabah, the story follows the familiar tale of a poor young man who is granted three wishes by a genie in a lamp, which he uses to woo a princess and to thwart the sultan's evil Grand Vizier.

Aladdin premiered at the 5th Avenue Theatre in Seattle in 2011. After several regional and international productions in 2012, the musical was given a Toronto tryout in 2013. The Broadway production opened at the New Amsterdam Theatre on March 20, 2014 and has been produced globally since.

Aladdin (2019 film)

Aladdin is an upcoming American musical romantic fantasy adventure film directed by Guy Ritchie, from the screenplay co-written with John August, and produced by Walt Disney Pictures. It is a live-action adaptation of Disney's 1992 animated film of the same name, which is in turn based on the Arabic folktale of the same name from One Thousand and One Nights and the French interpretation by Antoine Galland. The film stars Mena Massoud as the title character alongside Will Smith, Naomi Scott, Marwan Kenzari, Navid Negahban, Nasim Pedrad, Billy Magnussen, and Numan Acar.

In October 2016, Disney announced Guy Ritchie would direct a live-action Aladdin remake. Smith was the first member of the cast to join, signing on to voice Genie in July 2017, and later that month Massoud and Scott were confirmed for the two lead roles. Principal photography began that September at Longcross Studios in Surrey, England, also filming in the Wadi Rum Desert in Jordan, and lasted until January 2018.

Aladdin is scheduled to be released in the United States on May 24, 2019.

Aladdin (Disney character)

Aladdin is a fictional character and the titular protagonist of Walt Disney Pictures's 31st animated feature film Aladdin (1992) based on Aladdin, a folk tale of Middle Eastern origin. He is voiced by American actor Scott Weinger, while his singing voice is provided by Brad Kane. He also stars in the two direct-to-video sequels The Return of Jafar (1994) and Aladdin and the King of Thieves (1996), as well as the animated television series based on the film. Mena Massoud is set to play a live-action version of the character in a live action adaptation of the 1992 film.

When Aladdin is initially introduced, he is eighteen years old. He never received a formal education, and has only learned by living on the streets of Agrabah. He has to steal food in the local market in order to survive. He was born to Cassim and his wife. When Aladdin was only an infant, his father left him and his mother in order to find a better life for his family. When Aladdin was two, his mother was captured by bandits and was presumed dead. Aladdin's parents were too poor to provide clothing for their son. When Aladdin was seven, he had his first encounter with Razoul, the new captain of the Sultan's guard. Aladdin had stolen an apple from a fruit stand.

Initially, the boy managed to outmaneuver the guards. Eventually, he was apprehended and sentenced to detention within the palace dungeon. However, he managed to escape by picking the locks to his chains. When he was twelve, he stole a vest, a pair of pants, and a fez from a clothes line. When he was sixteen he fell in with a group of circus performers, one of whom was the monkey Abu.

Aladdin (animated TV series)

Aladdin is an American animated television series produced by Walt Disney Television Animation which aired from September 5, 1994, to November 25, 1995, based on the original 1992 Disney film of the same name. The series is set after The Return of Jafar, and picked up where the installment left off.

The series was produced by Alan Zaslove and Tad Stones, who were already renowned for their work on Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers and Darkwing Duck. Many of the films' stars provided the voices of their TV counterparts, with the notable exceptions of Dan Castellaneta filling in for Robin Williams in the Genie role (like in The Return of Jafar), and Val Bettin as the Sultan (who replaced Douglas Seale after the original film). Unlike The Little Mermaid, the series does not feature any musical numbers.

The series originally aired as a preview on The Disney Channel in early 1994, and in September of that year it began airing concurrently on the syndicated The Disney Afternoon block and on Saturday mornings on CBS (prior to Disney's purchase of rival ABC). Disney Channel reran the series from 1997 until 2000. The show was shown on Toon Disney from April 1998 until December 2008.

The series was followed by Aladdin and the King of Thieves, which was released on August 13, 1996.

Aladdin (franchise)

Aladdin is a Disney media franchise comprising a film series and additional media. It began with the 1992 American animated feature of the same name, which was based on the tale of the same name, and was directed by Ron Clements and John Musker. The success of the film led to two direct-to-video sequels, a television series (which had a crossover episode with Hercules: The Animated Series), a Broadway musical, various rides and themed areas in Disney's theme parks, several video games, and merchandise, among other related works. The franchise as a whole has EGOT-ed, meaning it has won the four biggest awards of American show business: the Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony Awards.

Aladdin - Naam Toh Suna Hoga

Aladdin - Naam Toh Suna Hoga (Aladdin - You Must Have Heard The Name) is an Indian fantasy television series that airs on SAB TV. It premiered on 21 August 2018 and stars Siddharth Nigam and Avneet Kaur in the lead roles of Aladdin and Princess Yasmine respectively.

Aladdin Sane

Aladdin Sane is the sixth studio album by English musician David Bowie, released by RCA Records on 13 April 1973. The follow-up to his breakthrough The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, it was the first album he wrote and released from a position of stardom.NME editors Roy Carr and Charles Shaar Murray called the album "oddly unsatisfying, considerably less than the sum of the parts", while Bowie encyclopedist Nicholas Pegg describes it as "one of the most urgent, compelling and essential" of his releases. The Rolling Stone review by Ben Gerson pronounced it "less manic than The Man Who Sold The World, and less intimate than Hunky Dory, with none of its attacks of self-doubt." The album cover featuring a lightning bolt across his face is regarded as one of Bowie's most iconic images.In 2003, the album was ranked among six Bowie entries on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time (at #277) and was later ranked No. 77 on Pitchfork Media's list of the top 100 albums of the 1970s.

Aladdin and the King of Thieves

Aladdin and the King of Thieves (also known as Aladdin 3: Aladdin and the King of Thieves) is a 1996 American direct-to-video animated musical fantasy adventure film produced by Walt Disney Television Animation. It is the second sequel to the 1992 film Aladdin, and serves as the final chapter of the Arabian Nights-inspired Disney franchise beginning with the first film, and continuing with its first direct-to-video sequel The Return of Jafar and the animated series of the same name.

The film is inspired by the tale Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves from One Thousand and One Nights, replacing Ali Baba with Aladdin, and for the first time since the original Aladdin, the film has a completely new soundtrack instead of the rearranged music from the original film for The Return of Jafar and the series.

Though the film serves as the finale of the series, the characters also appear in a 1999 crossover episode of the animated series Hercules, titled "Hercules and the Arabian Night", as well as the 2007 direct-to-video title called Disney Princess Enchanted Tales: Follow Your Dreams.

Genie (Disney)

The Genie is a fictional Djinn appearing in Walt Disney Pictures' animated feature film Aladdin (1992). He was voiced by Robin Williams in the first film. Following a contract dispute between Williams and the Walt Disney Company, Dan Castellaneta voiced the Genie throughout the direct-to-video feature The Return of Jafar, as well as the television series, before Williams reprised the role for the final installment, Aladdin and the King of Thieves, as well as for the character's own mini-series, Great Minds Think for Themselves. Castellaneta voiced the Genie in Aladdin in Nasira's Revenge and later the Kingdom Hearts series of video games by Square Enix and Disney Interactive Studios for both Kingdom Hearts and Kingdom Hearts II (with archived audio used in other Kingdom Hearts games). Jim Meskimen took over the role in Disney Think Fast (2008) and Kinect Disneyland Adventures (2011) and currently voices him, after Williams' death in 2014.

Will Smith is set to play a live-action version of the character in a live-action adaptation of the 1992 film.

List of Disney's Aladdin characters

Disney's Aladdin franchise features an extensive cast of fictional characters.

The lead character of the series is Aladdin, who was originally a street urchin. During the course of the franchise, he starts living in the palace of Agrabah and becomes engaged to Princess Jasmine.

Planet Hollywood Las Vegas

Planet Hollywood Las Vegas (formerly Aladdin) is a hotel and casino located on the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada. It is owned and operated by Caesars Entertainment Corporation.

Toy manufacturer Edwin S. Lowe originally opened the 450-room Tally Ho hotel on the property in 1963. The Tally Ho was the only major hotel in Nevada to not include a casino; it closed at the end of the year and was sold to Kings Crown Inns of America, Incorporated, a hotel chain which reopened the property a month later as King's Crown Tally Ho. The company added a casino and showroom but plans to open the casino were halted when the Nevada Gaming Control Board declined to issue a gambling license because of concerns about the resort being inadequately financed.

Milton Prell purchased the hotel in January 1966 and began an extensive $3 million renovation of the property before reopening it as the Aladdin on April 1, 1966. A 19-story hotel tower was added in 1972. After various ownership changes, the Aladdin was closed in 1997 and demolished the following year to make room for a new resort that would also be named Aladdin. The new Aladdin resort opened in August 2000, but suffered financial difficulties and was eventually purchased in 2003 by a partnership of Planet Hollywood and Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, which renamed it as Planet Hollywood in 2007.

Hilton Grand Vacations operates the timeshare portion of the property, known as Elara.

In April 2010, Total Rewards replaced the "A-List" Player rewards card at Planet Hollywood.

Princess Jasmine

Princess Jasmine is a fictional character who appears in Walt Disney Pictures' animated feature film Aladdin (1992). Voiced by American actress Linda Larkin – with a singing voice provided by Filipina singer Lea Salonga – Jasmine is the spirited Princess of Agrabah, who has grown weary of her life of palace confinement. Despite an age-old law stipulating that the princess must marry a prince in time for her upcoming birthday, Jasmine is instead determined to marry someone she loves for who he is as opposed to what he owns. Created by directors Ron Clements and John Musker with screenwriters Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio, Jasmine is based on Badroulbadour, a princess who appears in the One Thousand and One Nights folktale "Aladdin and the Magical Lamp".

Originally conceived as a spoiled, materialistic princess, the writers eventually re-wrote Jasmine into a stronger and more prominent heroine following the elimination of Aladdin's mother from the script, while borrowing story elements from the romantic comedy Roman Holiday (1953). Several months after securing the role, Larkin was nearly fired from the project because Disney executive Jeffrey Katzenberg felt that her voice was not suitable for a princess, but Clements and Musker managed to convince him otherwise. Discovered by casting director Albert Tavares, Lea Salonga was cast as Jasmine's singing voice based on her performance in the musical Miss Saigon; this unprecedented casting decision made Jasmine the first Disney Princess to have her speaking and singing voices provided by two different actresses. Animated by Mark Henn, Jasmine's design is an eclectic combination of unique sources, including an anonymous theme park guest, Henn's own sister, and actress Jennifer Connelly.

Unlike most of Disney's princesses, Jasmine holds the distinction of being a supporting character in her own film, having been relegated to the secondary role of the love interest. The character has garnered mixed reviews, with much denunciation directed towards her storyline and personality, both of which critics have dismissed as uninteresting and unoriginal; they have also accused Jasmine of lacking the depth of her predecessors Ariel and Belle from The Little Mermaid (1989) and Beauty and the Beast (1991), respectively, to whom she continues to be heavily compared. However, as the sixth Disney Princess and the franchise's first non-white member, the character is credited with introducing racial diversity to Disney's princess genre, although she has at the same time been criticized for being Westernized and Anglicized in both appearance and demeanor. Jasmine has made subsequent appearances in Aladdin's sequels The Return of Jafar (1994) and Aladdin and the King of Thieves (1996), as well as its television series and a Broadway musical adaption of the film. Both Larkin and Salonga have been awarded Disney Legends for their contributions to the role. Naomi Scott is set to play the character in a live action adaptation of the 1992 film.

Scott Weinger

Scott Weinger (born October 5, 1975) is an American actor, voice actor, writer and producer, best known as the voice of the title character in Disney's Aladdin. Weinger reprised the role in the two direct-to-video sequels, the television series of the same name, and the Kingdom Hearts and Disney Infinity video game series. He is also known for playing Steve Hale on the ABC sitcom Full House and its Netflix sequel Fuller House. He is also a writer and producer for television, including for ABC's Galavant and Black-ish. He was a co-executive producer of ABC's The Muppets.

The Magic Carpets of Aladdin

The Magic Carpets of Aladdin is a ride in Magic Kingdom, at Walt Disney World. It is based on the 1992 film, Aladdin. It is similar to the Dumbo the Flying Elephant attraction in that riders in the front rows control how high their carpets fly, and the ride lasts about 90 seconds. Aladdin's magic lamp is at the top, rather than Timothy Mouse. At the entrance, there is a camel that squirts people as they walk by, much like the Stitch figurine outside the World of Disney store. Guests who have visited Adventureland before may notice that this area has a new look. The shops look like the marketplace buildings from Aladdin, and different characters from Aladdin are in some of the buildings to do meet & greets and sign autographs.The attraction opened at Walt Disney Studios Park in Disneyland Paris on 16 March 2002, as Flying Carpets Over Agrabah. The attraction is set against a large "movie set" backdrop of Agrabah, with guests playing as the extras in Genie's directorial debut.

A third version of the attraction opened at Tokyo DisneySea in Tokyo Disney Resort on July 18, 2011, as Jasmine's Flying Carpets. The attraction is next to Sindbad’s Storybook Voyage.

The Return of Jafar

The Return of Jafar (also known as Aladdin 2: The Return of Jafar) is a 1994 American direct-to-video animated musical fantasy adventure film produced by Walt Disney Television Animation. It is the first sequel to the 1992 film Aladdin, and serves as the pilot to the Aladdin animated series. Released on May 20, 1994, it was the first Disney direct-to-video animated film, and marked the first American direct-to-video animated film.It sold 15 million VHS tapes and grossed $300 million, becoming one of the best-selling films on home video. Another direct-to-video sequel, Aladdin and the King of Thieves, was released in 1996.

Zappos Theater

Zappos Theater (formerly The AXIS and Aladdin Theatre for the Performing Arts) is a mid-sized auditorium located at Planet Hollywood Las Vegas on the Las Vegas Strip. The venue hosts a variety of events from charity benefits, concerts and award shows. It is used frequently for the beauty pageants : Miss Universe, Miss USA and Miss Teen USA. Since 2013, the auditorium has been the home to Britney Spears's concert residency 'Piece of Me' and Justin Timberlake's annual concert to benefit the Shriners Hospitals for Children. In 2011, it was voted as one of the "Best Concert Halls & Theaters In Las Vegas".

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