Al Cowens

Alfred Edward Cowens, Jr. (October 25, 1951 – March 11, 2002) was a right fielder in Major League Baseball. From 1974 through 1986, Cowens played for the Kansas City Royals (1974–79), California Angels (1980), Detroit Tigers (1980–81) and Seattle Mariners (1982–86). He batted and threw right-handed.

Al Cowens
Right fielder
Born: October 25, 1951
Los Angeles, California
Died: March 11, 2002 (aged 50)
Downey, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 6, 1974, for the Kansas City Royals
Last MLB appearance
June 8, 1986, for the Seattle Mariners
MLB statistics
Batting average.270
Home runs108
Runs batted in717
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Baseball career

A native of Los Angeles, California, Cowens was a product of the Kansas City Royals farm system. He made his major league debut with the Royals in 1974 and played for them through 1979. His most productive season came in 1977, when he batted .312 with 23 home runs and 112 RBI, earned a Gold Glove, and finished second to Rod Carew in balloting for the American League MVP Award.

A notable feud started between Cowens and Texas Rangers reliever Ed Farmer early in the 1979 season. In the May 8 game at Arlington Stadium, a Farmer pitch thrown in the top of the 5th inning fractured Cowens' jaw and broke several teeth;[1] Cowens would miss 21 games. Farmer also hit Cowens' teammate Frank White in the same game and broke his wrist[2] and caused him to miss 33 contests. The following year, in a game between the Detroit Tigers and the Chicago White Sox at Comiskey Park on June 20‚ 1980‚ Cowens (now a Detroit Tiger) hit an infield grounder against Farmer (pitching for the White Sox). While Farmer watched his infielder make the play, Cowens ran to mound and tackled the pitcher from behind, instead of running to first base; getting in several punches before the benches cleared and the two were separated.[2] Cowens was suspended for 7 games and a warrant was issued for his arrest in Illinois‚ forcing him to skip the remainder of the series. Later Farmer agreed to drop the charges in exchange for a handshake‚ and the 2 players brought out the lineup cards before the game on September 1. However, future appearances for Cowens in Chicago were greeted with a "Coward Cowens" banner.

In a 13-year career, Cowens was a .270 hitter with 108 home runs and 717 RBI in 1584 games.

Death

Cowens died in Downey, California on March 11, 2002 at the age of 50 from a heart attack. At the time of his death, Cowens had been scouting players for the Kansas City Royals. He is buried at Inglewood Park Cemetery in Inglewood, California.

References

  1. ^ "May 8, 1979 Kansas City Royals at Texas Rangers Box Score and Play by Play". Baseball-Reference.com. 1979-05-08. Retrieved 2012-03-27.
  2. ^ a b "Cooperstown Confidential: Thinking of Al Cowens". Hardballtimes.com. Retrieved 2012-03-27.

External links

1974 Kansas City Royals season

The 1974 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing fifth in the American League West with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses.

1975 Kansas City Royals season

The 1975 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. In the Royals' seventh season, they finished second in the American League West with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses. Manager Jack McKeon was fired on July 24, replaced by Whitey Herzog.

1976 Kansas City Royals season

The 1976 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing first in the American League West with a record of 90 wins and 72 losses. They lost in the 1976 American League Championship Series to the New York Yankees, three games to two.

1977 American League Championship Series

The 1977 American League Championship Series was a five-game series played between October 5 and 9, 1977, at Yankee Stadium (Games 1–2), and Royals Stadium (3–5). The Yankees took the series 3–2, and would later go on to beat the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1977 World Series to take the title. Kansas City was given home-field advantage as it rotated back to the West Division; the Royals held a 102–60 record to the Yankees' 100–62 record.

1977 Kansas City Royals season

The 1977 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing first in the American League West with a record of 102 wins and 60 losses. They went on to lose the 1977 American League Championship Series to the New York Yankees, 3 games to 2.

1978 Kansas City Royals season

The 1978 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing first in the American League West with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses. The team went on to lose in the 1978 American League Championship Series to the New York Yankees, 3 games to 1.

1980 California Angels season

The 1980 California Angels season involved the Angels finishing 6th in the American League West with a record of 65 wins and 95 losses.

1980 Detroit Tigers season

The 1980 Detroit Tigers finished in fourth place in the American League East with a record of 84-78, 19 games behind the Yankees. They outscored their opponents 830 to 757. The Tigers drew 1,785,293 fans to Tiger Stadium in 1980, ranking 7th of the 14 teams in the American League.

1981 Detroit Tigers season

The 1981 Detroit Tigers finished in fourth place in the American League East with a record of 31-26 (.544) in the first half of the season, and in third place with a record of 29-23 (.558) in the second half, for an overall record of 60-49. They outscored their opponents 427 to 404. The Tigers drew 1,149,144 fans to Tiger Stadium in 1981, ranking 5th of the 14 teams in the American League.

1982 Seattle Mariners season

The Seattle Mariners 1982 season was their sixth since the franchise creation, and ended the season finishing 4th in the American League West with a record of 76–86 (.469).

1983 Seattle Mariners season

The Seattle Mariners 1983 season was their seventh since the franchise creation, and ended the season finishing 7th in the American League West with a record of 60–102 (.370).

1984 Seattle Mariners season

The Seattle Mariners 1984 season was their eighth since the franchise creation, and ended the season finishing 5th in the American League West with a record of 74–88 (.457).

1985 Seattle Mariners season

The Seattle Mariners 1985 season was their ninth since the franchise creation, and ended the season finishing 6th in the American League West with a record of 74–88 (.457).

1986 Seattle Mariners season

The Seattle Mariners 1986 season was their tenth since the franchise creation, and ended the season finishing 7th in the American League West with a record of 67–95 (.414).

Cowens

Cowens is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Al Cowens (1951–2002), American baseball outfielder

Dave Cowens (born 1948), American basketball player

Craig Eaton

Craig Eaton (born September 7, 1954) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played for one season. He was a pitcher who pitched in five games for the Kansas City Royals during the 1979 season. He played college baseball at Florida State University.

Craig attended Lake Worth High School (Lake Worth, FL) and graduated in the class of 1972 at the age of 17. He went to Miami-Dade College (Miami, FL) for 2 years and was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in the 6th round of the 1974 MLB June Amateur Draft. He declined the draft to complete his B.S. in Marine Biology at Florida State University. He signed with the Kansas City Royals on June 25 as a free agent after graduating, and was called up to the major leagues toward the end of the 1979 season. On April 1, 1980 he was traded to the California Angels to complete an earlier deal made on December 6, 1979. The Royals sent a player to be named later (Craig Eaton), Al Cowens, and Todd Cruz to the Angels for Rance Mulliniks and Willie Aikens. At the Angel's organization he played in the Triple-A Pacific Coast League (PCL), followed by Triple-A for the Detroit Tigers in 1983 and finished his career with the Montreal Expos in 1984. In the 1983 off-season, Craig sustained knee injuries on a golf course and had the first of three knee surgeries after completing the 1984 season.

Craig married his high school sweetheart, Suzanne Sullivan, in 1977 and they have 4 daughters. He currently lives in Lake Worth, Florida.

Deaths in March 2002

The following is a list of notable deaths in March 2002.

Entries for each day are listed alphabetically by surname. A typical entry lists information in the following sequence:

Name, age, country of citizenship at birth, subsequent country of citizenship (if applicable), reason for notability, cause of death (if known), and reference.

Ed Farmer

Edward (E.D.) Joseph Farmer (born October 18, 1949) is an American former Major League Baseball pitcher. He played for the Cleveland Indians, Detroit Tigers, Baltimore Orioles, Milwaukee Brewers, Texas Rangers, Chicago White Sox and Oakland A's, all in the American League, and the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League, from 1971 to 1974 and 1977 to 1983. Farmer is the play-by-play broadcaster for Chicago White Sox radio broadcasts.

Kingsport Mets

The Kingsport Mets are a Minor League Baseball team of the Appalachian League and the Rookie affiliate of the New York Mets. They are located in Kingsport, Tennessee, and are named for the team's major league affiliate. The team plays its home games at Hunter Wright Stadium which opened in 1995 and has a seating capacity of 2,500. The Mets previously played at Dobyns-Bennett High School. In 1983, while Dobyns-Bennett's field was being renovated, the team temporarily moved to Sarasota, Florida, and played in the Gulf Coast League as the Gulf Coast League Mets.

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