Al Carmichael

Albert Reinhold Carmichael (born November 10, 1928) is a former American football player.

Carmichael holds the distinction of scoring the first touchdown in American Football League history, a 59-yard pass reception from Frank Tripucka for the Broncos against the Boston Patriots on September 9, 1960.

Al Carmichael
AlCarmichaelByPhilKonstantin
No. 42, 48, 40
Position:Halfback, kick returner
Personal information
Born:November 10, 1928 (age 90)
Boston, Massachusetts
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:200 lb (91 kg)
Career information
High school:Gardena (CA)
College:USC
NFL Draft:1953 / Round: 1 / Pick: 7
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • Packers Hall of Fame
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

High school career

Carmichael prepped at Gardena High School.

College career

Carmichael played college football at the University of Southern California (USC). At USC he scored the winning touchdown in the 1953 Rose Bowl against Wisconsin. Carmichael caught a third quarter pass from back-up quarter Rudy Bukich to win the game, 7–0.

Professional career

Carmichael played for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League between 1953 and 1958; then he was with the Denver Broncos of the American Football League in 1960 and 1961. He twice led pro football in kick off return yards. He scored the first touchdown in American Football League history, a 59-yard pass reception from Frank Tripucka for the Broncos against the Boston Patriots on September 9, 1960. He also has the tenth longest play in NFL history, a 106-yard kick off return for touchdown.

Stunt double

Carmichael played as a stuntman in more than 50 films including Jim Thorpe – All-American (1951) for Burt Lancaster (1951), Saturday's Hero (1951), All-American (1953), Pork Chop Hill (1959), It Started with a Kiss (1959), The Big Operator, Elmer Gantry (1960), one of the doubles for Kirk Douglas in Spartacus (1960), Birdman of Alcatraz (1962), Son of Flubber (1962), How the West was Won (1962), and the TV show Rawhide.[1]

Family

Carmichael's married Jan and the had three children Chris, Pam, and Stacy. He lived in Orange County working in the pool-cleaning and automobile businesses before moving to Palm Desert to sell real estate in 1984.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Google Books: Hollywood Stunt Performers, 1910s-1970s: A Biographical Dictionary, 2d ed.- Retrieved 2019-02-05
  2. ^ Tapping His Potential : Late Start Didn't Slow Al Carmichael (by Mike DiGiovanna, October 21, 1992)- Retrieved 2019-02-03

External links

1950 USC Trojans football team

The 1950 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1950 college football season. In their ninth year under head coach Jeff Cravath, the Trojans compiled a 2–5–2 record (1–3–2 against conference opponents), finished in seventh place in the Pacific Coast Conference, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 182 to 114.Wilbur Robertson led the team in passing with 50 of 106 passes completed for 492 yards, one touchdown and eight interceptions. Al Carmichael led the team in rushing with 103 carries for 514 yards and two touchdowns. Harold Hatford was the leading receiver with 22 catches for 192 yards and one touchdown.Three Trojans received honors from the Associated Press (AP), United Press (UP), or conference coaches on the 1950 All-Pacific Coast Conference football team: Johnny Williams, USC (Coaches-1 [defensive back]); Volney Peters, USC (AP-1 [defensive tackle]; Coaches-1 [offensive and defensive tackle]; UP-1); and Paul McMurtry, USC (Coaches-1 [guard]).

1953 Green Bay Packers season

The 1953 Green Bay Packers season was their 35th season overall and their 33rd in the National Football League. The club posted a 2–9–1 record under head coach Gene Ronzani and interim co-coaches Ray McLean, and Hugh Devore, and finished last in the newly named Western Conference.

Fourth-year head coach Ronzani led the team for the first ten games, but resigned after a nationally televised Thanksgiving Day loss, his eighth loss to the Detroit Lions in four seasons; McLean and Devore co-coached the last two games of the season, both losses.

It was the only in-season coaching change in Packers history, until 2018. This season also marked the first season that the Packers played at the recently completed Milwaukee County Stadium.

1960 Denver Broncos season

The 1960 Denver Broncos season was the team's inaugural year in the American Football League. Led by head coach Frank Filchock, the Broncos recorded four wins, nine losses, and one tie, finishing last in the AFL's Western Division.

Bob Dee

Robert Henry Dee (May 18, 1933 – April 18, 1979) was an American football defensive end in the National Football League and the American Football League. He was a three-sport letterman at the College of the Holy Cross who was one of the first players signed by the Boston Patriots of the American Football League in 1960.

After two years with the Washington Redskins in 1957–58, Dee returned to Holy Cross to tutor the team's linemen.

He became an ironman of the American Football League who never missed a game during his career, starting 112 consecutive games. Despite equipment improvements over the years, Dee was a superstitious player who chose to wear the same helmet throughout his career (105 of 112 games). Dee etched his name in the history books by scoring the first points in American Football League history, scoring a touchdown when he dove onto a fumble by Bills QB Tommy O'Connell (father of former Boston Bruins GM Mike O'Connell) the end zone in the second quarter of the league's first-ever exhibition game, a contest between the Patriots and the Bills on July 30, 1960. He was voted to four American Football League All-Star teams (1961, 1963–65) and is a member of the Patriots All-1960s (AFL) Team.

Dee recorded 33 QB sacks (not including his strip sack of Tommy O'Connell in the AFL's first Exhibition Game).

Dee sacked Frank Tripucka, Al Dorow, Hunter Enis, Jacky Lee, MC Reynolds, Randy Duncan, Cotton Davidson, George Blanda, Jack Kemp, Johnny Green, John Hadl, Tobin Rote, Len Dawson, Eddie Wilson, Dick Wood, Joe Namath, Tom Flores, Rick Norton and Bob Griese and recovered fumbles by Al Carmichael, Art Baker, Wayne Crow, Jacky Lee, Paul Lowe, Bill Tobin, Wray Carlton & Max Chobian.

He had two interceptions in the Patriots 26-8 Eastern Divisional Playoff Game win over the Buffalo Bills. In that game, he wore one sneaker and one football shoe with spikes, which made him maneuver better in the snow in the game played at War Memorial Stadium on December 28, 1963.

On July 22, 1968, Dee announced his retirement from professional football, citing a business opportunity that was "too good to resist."

Dee died of a heart attack in 1979 while on a business trip.

He was awarded a game ball for his outstanding performance in the Patriots 34-17 win over the Houston Oilers on November 29, 1964.

He was inducted in the Patriots Hall of Fame on August 18, 1993.

In recognition of his accomplishments on the field, the Patriots retired his number (89).

Bob Monnett

Robert C. Monnett (February 27, 1910 – August 2, 1978) was a professional American football player who played halfback for six seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973.

Charley Brock

Charles Jacob "Charley" Brock (March 15, 1916 – May 25, 1987) was an American football center and linebacker.

Gerry Ellis

Gerry Ellis (born November 12, 1957

in Columbia, Missouri) is a former professional American football player who played running back for seven seasons for the Green Bay Packers.

Hank Bruder

Henry George "Hank" Bruder Jr. (November 22, 1907 – June 29, 1970) was an American football player in the National Football League. He played nine years with the Green Bay Packers from 1931 to 1939 and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1972. Bruder attended Northwestern University, where he was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity.He was part of the offensive line that blocked for Pro Football Hall of Fame back Johnny "Blood" McNally.

Hank Gremminger

Charles Henry "Hank" Gremminger (September 1, 1933 – November 2, 2001) was an American football player, a defensive back in the National Football League for eleven seasons. He played ten seasons for the Green Bay Packers (1956–1965) and one for the Los Angeles Rams in 1966.

Jesse Whittenton

Urshell James "Jesse" Whittenton (May 9, 1934 – May 21, 2012) was an American football player who played nine seasons in the NFL, mainly for the Green Bay Packers.

Whittenton also played on the Senior PGA Tour in the late 1980s. His best finish was T-21 at the 1989 Showdown Classic.

Johnnie Gray

Johnnie Lee Gray (born December 18, 1953) is an American retired professional football player. Gray was a safety in the National Football League with the Green Bay Packers.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of National Football League annual kickoff return yards leaders

This is a list of National Football League kickoff returners who have led the regular season in kickoff return yards each year.

Mike Douglass (American football)

Michael Reese Douglass (born March 15, 1955 in St. Louis, Missouri) is a former American football player. He played outside linebacker for the Green Bay Packers (1978–1985) and the San Diego Chargers (1986) in the National Football League. He ranks third in the lists of tackles made by a Packers player.

Nate Barragar

Nathan Robert Barragar (June 3, 1907 – August 10, 1985) was an American collegiate and professional football player.

Pete Tinsley

Elijah Pope "Pete" Tinsley (March 16, 1913 – May 11, 1995) was a professional football player, born in Sumter, South Carolina, who played guard, defense and offense for eight seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1979.

Santa Ana College

Santa Ana College is a community college located in Santa Ana, California, USA.

What Kind of Fool Do You Think I Am

"What Kind of Fool Do You Think I Am" is a song recorded by American country music artist Lee Roy Parnell, written by Al Carmichael and Gary Griffin. It was released in May 1992 as the second single from the album, Love Without Mercy. The song was Parnell's fifth single release, and his first to reach Top 40 on the Hot Country Songs charts. It is also one of three singles in his career to reach number two on the country music charts.

Whitey Woodin

Howard Lee "Whitey" Woodin (January 29, 1894 – February 7, 1974) was an American football player. He played with the Racine Legion and the Green Bay Packers and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973. After retiring from football, Woodin remained in Green Bay and worked for many years at Falls Power and Paper Company.

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