Airplay

In radio broadcasting, airplay is how frequently a song is being played on radio stations. A song which is being played several times every day (spins) would have a large amount of airplay.[1][2] Music which became very popular on jukeboxes, in nightclubs and at discotheques between the 1940s and 1960s would also have airplay.

For commercial broadcasting, airplay is usually the result of being placed into rotation, also called adding it to the station's playlist by the music director, possibly as the result of a Pay for Play sponsored by the record label.[3][4] For student radio and other community radio or indie radio stations, it is often the selection by each disc jockey, usually at the suggestion of a music director.

Most countries have at least one radio airplay chart in existence, although larger countries such as Canada, the United States of America,[5] the United Kingdom, Germany, Australia,[1] Japan, and Brazil have several, to cover different genres and areas of the country.[6][7][8]

A song which was successful in the airplay charts but weak in sales was commonly known as a "turntable hit" when radio stations played only vinyl singles.[9] Airplay can be a crucial element in securing a singer's 'hit', and alongside social networking websites it is an effective method that artists use to make their name known.[5][10]

Aaliyah's "Try Again" (2000) was the first song ever to reach number one on the Billboard Hot 100 based solely on the strength of its radio airplay.[11]

Radio airplay is monitored through audio fingerprinting technology with the help of automatic content recognition service. World recognizable music airplay service providers are ACRCloud, Bmat and Soundcharts...etc

References

  1. ^ a b "Aussie acts buck airplay snub". news.com.au. April 21, 2008. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  2. ^ Sharbutt, Jay (December 10, 1977). "Sunday's Billboard music awards: Records sales, airplay the key". Eugene Register-Guard. Associated Press. p. TV9. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  3. ^ Abbott, Jim (December 19, 1998). "Radio deal puts spin on airplay". Orlando Sentinel. p. C1. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  4. ^ Leeds, Jeff (December 27, 2001). "Middlemen Put Price on Airplay". Los Angeles Times. p. C1. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  5. ^ a b DeKnock, Jan (August 6, 1986). "Billboard's numbers game can make or break a record". Chicago Tribune. p. 3. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  6. ^ "Sales and airplay decide what counts as a hit". USA Today. October 24, 1994. p. 4D. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  7. ^ Barnes, Ken (January 3, 2002). "Country rules on the radio; There's not a Britney in this airplay bunch". USA Today. p. D1. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  8. ^ Trevett, Claire (March 15, 2006). "New Zealand music achieves record level of local airplay". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  9. ^ Posniak, Alan (October 2, 1968). "Badger Beat: Wisconsin Bands and Combos". The Milwaukee Journal. Retrieved February 26, 2010. Consequently, what we ended up with was a turntable hit (so called because it received lots of play on disk jockeys' record turntables).
  10. ^ DeKnock, Jan (July 17, 1992). "The case of the airplay-poor hits". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 26, 2010.
  11. ^ Ramirez, Erika (August 25, 2011). "Aaliyah's Top 10 Billboard Hits". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved August 25, 2011.

External links

Billboard Hot 100

The Billboard Hot 100 is the music industry standard record chart in the United States for songs, published weekly by Billboard magazine. Chart rankings are based on sales (physical and digital), radio play, and online streaming in the United States.

The weekly tracking period for sales was initially Monday to Sunday when Nielsen started tracking sales in 1991, but was changed to Friday to Thursday in July 2015. This tracking period also applies to compiling online streaming data. Radio airplay, which, unlike sales figures and streaming, is readily available on a real-time basis, is tracked on a Monday to Sunday cycle (previously Wednesday to Tuesday). A new chart is compiled and officially released to the public by Billboard on Tuesdays.

The first number one song of the Hot 100 was "Poor Little Fool" by Ricky Nelson, on August 4, 1958. As of the issue for the week ending on May 25, 2019, the Hot 100 has had 1,086 different number one entries. The chart's current number-one song is "Old Town Road" by Lil Nas X featuring Billy Ray Cyrus.

Billboard charts

The Billboard charts tabulate the relative weekly popularity of songs and albums in the United States and elsewhere. The results are published in Billboard magazine. Billboard biz, the online extension of the Billboard charts, provides additional weekly charts. There are also Year End charts. The charts may be dedicated to specific genre such as R&B, country or rock, or they may cover all genres. The charts can be ranked according to sales, streams or airplay, and for main song charts such as the Hot 100 song chart, all three pools of data are used to compile the charts. For the Billboard 200 album chart, streams and track sales are included in addition to album sales.The weekly sales and streams charts are monitored on a Friday-to-Thursday cycle since July 2015, previously it was on a Monday-to-Sunday cycle. Radio airplay song charts however follows the Monday to Sunday cycle (previously Wednesday to Tuesday). The charts are released each Tuesday with an issue date the following Saturday, four days later.

Country Airplay

Country Airplay is a chart published weekly by Billboard magazine in the United States since January 20, 1990.

This chart lists the 60 most-listened-to records played on 150 mainstream country radio stations across the country as monitored by Nielsen BDS, weighted to each station's Nielsen ratings.

The first number-one song was "Nobody's Home" by Clint Black. The current number-one song, as of the chart dated May 25, 2019, is "Love Ain't" by Eli Young Band.

Dance/Mix Show Airplay

Dance/Mix Show Airplay (formerly Hot Dance Airplay) is a monitored electronic dance music radio chart that is featured weekly in Billboard magazine.

Hot 100 Airplay (Radio Songs)

The Radio Songs chart (previously named Hot 100 Airplay) is released weekly by Billboard magazine and measures the airplay of songs being played on radio stations throughout the United States across all musical genres. It is one of the three components, along with sales (both physical and the digital) and streaming activity, that determine the chart positions of songs on the Billboard Hot 100.

Hot Rap Songs

Hot Rap Songs (formerly known as Hot Rap Tracks and Hot Rap Singles, and also known as Rap Airplay) is a chart released weekly by Billboard in the United States. It lists the 25 most popular hip-hop/rap songs, calculated weekly by airplay on rhythmic and urban radio stations and sales in hip hop-focused or exclusive markets. Streaming data and digital downloads were added to the methodology of determining chart rankings in 2012. From 1989 through 2001, it was based on how much the single sold in that given week. The songs with the most weeks at number one is "Hot Boyz" by Missy Elliott featuring Nas, Eve and Q-Tip, and "Fancy" by Iggy Azalea and Charli XCX, singles that were number one for 18 weeks from December 1999 to March 2000 and May 2014 to August 2014, respectively.

Polish music charts

The Polish music charts are provided by ZPAV, the Polish Society of the Phonographic Industry (Polish: Związek Producentów Audio-Video).

R

R (named ar/or ) is the 18th letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

Rhythmic (chart)

The Rhythmic chart (also called Rhythmic Songs, and previously named Rhythmic Airplay, Rhythmic Top 40 and CHR/Rhythmic) is an airplay chart published weekly by Billboard magazine.

The chart tracks and measures the airplay of songs played on rhythmic radio stations, whose playlist includes mostly hit-driven R&B/hip-hop, rhythmic pop, and some dance tracks. Nielsen Audio sometimes refers to the format as rhythmic contemporary hit radio.

Tropical Songs

The Tropical Songs or Tropical Airplay chart (formerly known as Tropical/Salsa and Latin Tropical Airplay) is a record chart published on Billboard magazine established in 1994. The first number-one song to be published on the chart was "Quien Eres Tu" by Luis Enrique. It features Latin music information from tropical music such as salsa, merengue, bachata, reggaeton, cumbia and vallenato. This chart features only singles or tracks and like most Billboard charts, is based on Airplay; the radio charts are compiled using information tracked by from Nielsen Broadcast Data Systems (BDS), which electronically monitors radio stations in more than 140 markets across the United States. The audience charts cross-reference BDS data with listener information compiled by the Arbitron ratings system to determine the approximate number of audience impressions made for plays in each daypart. The chart was usually posted weekly until the introduction of the Latin Rhythm Airplay Chart in 2005 where it was posted every other week. As of August 2009, the Latin Tropical Airplay is now posted weekly on the Billboard website. On January 21, 2017, Billboard updated the methodology for the Tropical Songs chart to exclude songs that do not fit in the tropical music category. In addition, the chart now covers the top 25 songs on the chart as opposed to 40.

Companies and
organizations
Genres
Sectors and
roles
Release
formats
Live shows
Charts
Publications
Television
Achievements
Other

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.