Aiken County, South Carolina

Aiken County /ˈeɪkən/ is a county in the U.S. state of South Carolina. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, its population was 160,099.[1] Its county seat and largest city is Aiken.[2]

Aiken County is a part of the Augusta-Richmond County, GA-SC Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is mostly in the Sandhills region, with the northern parts reaching in the Piedmont and southern parts reaching into the Coastal Plain.

Aiken County, South Carolina
Augsky
Aiken County Courthouse
Seal of Aiken County, South Carolina

Seal
Map of South Carolina highlighting Aiken County

Location within the U.S. state of South Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting South Carolina

South Carolina's location within the U.S.
Founded1871
Named forWilliam Aiken
SeatAiken
Largest cityAiken
Area
 • Total1,081 sq mi (2,800 km2)
 • Land1,071 sq mi (2,774 km2)
 • Water9.6 sq mi (25 km2), 0.9%
Population (est.)
 • (2013)164,176
 • Density149/sq mi (58/km2)
Congressional district2nd
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4
Websitewww.aikencountysc.gov

History

Both Aiken County and its county seat of Aiken are named after William Aiken (1779–1831), the first president of the South Carolina Railroad Company. Aiken County was organized during the Reconstruction era in 1871 from portions of Barnwell, Edgefield, Lexington, and Orangeburg counties.[3]

Prince Rivers, a freedman and state legislator from Edgefield County, had been a leader in the United States Colored Troops. He was named to head the commission that drew the new county's boundary lines. He was dubbed "The Black Prince" by local newspapers, including the Edgefield Advertiser. He also led the commission that selected the site of Aiken County's present-day courthouse. Other freedmen who were part of the founding of the county were Samuel J. Lee, speaker of the state House and the first black man admitted to the South Carolina Bar; and Charles D. Hayne, a free man of color from one of Charleston's elite families.[4]

Political tensions kept rising in South Carolina during the 1870s, especially around elections. In the months prior to the 1876 elections, Aiken County was one of the areas to suffer white paramilitary Red Shirts attacks and violence directed against black Republicans to suppress the black vote. Between the Hamburg Massacre in July and several days of rioting in September in Ellenton, more than 100 black men were killed by white paramilitary groups in this county. Two white men died in the violence.[4]

In the late 19th century, the county became a popular winter refuge for affluent Northerners, who built luxury housing. The county remains popular with horse trainers and professional riders because mild winters allow lengthy training seasons.

In the 1950s, Aiken County, along with the nearby counties of Allendale and Barnwell was chosen as the location for storage of nuclear materials and various fissile materials, now known as the Savannah River Site. Ellenton, South Carolina was acquired and its buildings demolished for its development for this plant. Its residents and businesses were all moved north about eight miles to New Ellenton. Developed during Cold War tensions, the facility is now scheduled for decommissioning of various parts of the site.[3]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,081 square miles (2,800 km2), of which 1,071 square miles (2,770 km2) is land and 9.6 square miles (25 km2) (0.9%) is water.[5] It is the fourth-largest county in South Carolina by land area.

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
188028,112
189031,82213.2%
190039,03222.7%
191041,8497.2%
192045,5748.9%
193047,4034.0%
194049,9165.3%
195053,1376.5%
196081,03852.5%
197091,02312.3%
1980105,62516.0%
1990120,94014.5%
2000142,55217.9%
2010160,09912.3%
Est. 2016167,458[6]4.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2010-2013[1]

2000 census

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 142,552 people, 55,587 households, and 39,411 families residing in the county. The population density was 133 inhabitants per square mile (51/km2). There were 61,987 housing units at an average density of 58 per square mile (22/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 71.37% White, 25.56% Black or African American, 0.40% Native American, 0.63% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, and 1.18% from two or more races. 2.12% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 22.0% were of American, 9.7% English, 8.4% German and 7.9% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 55,587 households out of which 33.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.30% were married couples living together, 13.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.10% were non-families. 25.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.20% under the age of 18, 8.80% from 18 to 24, 28.90% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, and 12.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,889, and the median income for a family was $45,769. Males had a median income of $36,743 versus $23,810 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,772. About 10.60% of families and 13.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.90% of those under age 18 and 12.50% of those age 65 or over.[12]

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 160,099 people, 64,253 households, and 43,931 families residing in the county.[13] The population density was 149.5 inhabitants per square mile (57.7/km2). There were 72,249 housing units at an average density of 67.5 per square mile (26.1/km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 69.6% white, 24.6% black or African American, 0.8% Asian, 0.4% American Indian, 2.6% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 4.9% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 20.6% were American, 10.0% were English, 9.9% were German, and 8.6% were Irish.[15]

Of the 64,253 households, 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.3% were married couples living together, 14.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.6% were non-families, and 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.96. The median age was 40.0 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $44,468 and the median income for a family was $57,064. Males had a median income of $44,436 versus $33,207 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,172. About 13.4% of families and 16.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.7% of those under age 18 and 13.3% of those age 65 or over.[16]

The following is from the 2010 Census Total Population : 160,099 (100.00%)

Population by Race American Indian and Alaska native alone 682 (0.43%) Asian alone 1,329 (0.83%) Black or African American alone 39,354 (24.58%) Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific native alone 61 (0.04%) Some other race alone 4,126 (2.58%) Two or more races 3,090 (1.93%) White alone 111,457 (69.62%)

Population by Hispanic or Latino Origin (of any race) Persons Not of Hispanic or Latino Origin 152,275 (95.11%) Persons of Hispanic or Latino Origin 7,824 (4.89%)

Population by Gender Female 82,549 (51.56%) Male 77,550 (48.44%)

Population by Age Persons 0 to 4 years 10,046 (6.27%) Persons 5 to 17 years 26,782 (16.73%) Persons 18 to 64 years (98,652) 61.62% Persons 65 years and over 24,619 (15.38%)[17]

Government

Gary Bunker is the chairman of the Aiken County Council. The other members and their districts are as follows:[18]

  • Kathy Rawls- District 1
  • Camille Furgiuele - District 2
  • Danny Feagin - District 3
  • Chuck Smith- District 4
  • Sandy Haskell- District 5
  • Phil Napier - District 6
  • Andrew Siders - District 7
  • Willar H. Hightower Jr.- District 8[19]
  • Mike Hunt- Aiken County Sheriff[20]

Politics

Education

Aiken County Public School District

Communities

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Historic places

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 6, 2011. Retrieved November 22, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ a b Mary Morgan (19 March 2007). "History". Archived from the original on 2008-02-20. Retrieved 2008-03-29.
  4. ^ a b Jim Nesbitt, "County, once booming, now shadows town it used to rival" Archived 2008-11-20 at the Wayback Machine, Augusta Chronicle, 16 February 2004
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 15, 2015.
  6. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved March 15, 2015.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 15, 2015.
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 15, 2015.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 15, 2015.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  12. ^ "US Census Bureau Demographics Data". Factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2014-07-31.
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-03-09.
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-03-09.
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-03-09.
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-03-09.
  17. ^ "2010 Census Population of Aiken County, South Carolina". CensusViewer. Retrieved 2014-07-31.
  18. ^ https://www.aikencountysc.gov, Retrieved March 17, 2018
  19. ^ "Aiken County Government". Archived from the original on 6 March 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-29.
  20. ^ "Welcome to the Aiken County Sheriff". Aikencountysheriff.org. Retrieved 2014-07-31.
  21. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.

External links

Coordinates: 33°33′N 81°38′W / 33.55°N 81.64°W

Bath, South Carolina

Bath is an unincorporated community in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The community is located in the Horse Creek Valley, and its zip code is 29816.[1] It is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area.

Beech Island, South Carolina

Beech Island is an unincorporated community in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. It appears to take its name from Beech Island, a nearby former island that is politically part of Georgia but geographically separated from the rest of Georgia by a river which changed its bed. It was preceded by the trading post and fort at Savannah Town.

Beech Island was primarily an agricultural community before the 1950s. Cotton, wheat, corn, and soybean were the major crops. This changed with the construction of Urquhart Station Power Station and the nearby Savannah River Nuclear Project. New highways were built to accommodate the workers commuting to the Nuclear Project. Commerce grew and the community began to change. In the 1960s Kimberly-Clark built a large manufacturing facility on what was once farmland, creating more jobs. The boom, however, was short-lived.

Beech Island's most famous resident was James Brown, who lived there for the last few decades of his life on a 60-acre (240,000 m2) estate. Brown is buried in the Thomas Family Home Crypt on Beech Island.

The Cedars, Fort Moore-Savano Town Site, Redcliffe Plantation State Historic Site, Oakland Plantation, and Zubly Cemetery are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.Beech Island is also home to most of the television transmitters that serve the Augusta, GA MSA.

Belvedere, South Carolina

Belvedere is a census-designated place (CDP) and suburb of North Augusta in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. It is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area. The population was 5,792 at the 2010 census.

Burnettown, South Carolina

Burnettown is a town in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 2,673 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area. Burnettown is located in historic Horse Creek Valley.

Clearwater, South Carolina

Clearwater is a census-designated place (CDP) in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. It lies near North Augusta, South Carolina, and is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area. Clearwater is located in historic Horse Creek Valley. The population was 4,370 at the 2010 census.

Gloverville, South Carolina

Gloverville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 2,831 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area. Gloverville is located in historic Horse Creek Valley.

Graniteville, South Carolina

Graniteville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 2,614 at the 2010 census. It lies along U.S. Route 1, five miles (8.0 km) west of Aiken in Horse Creek Valley, which originates in the nearby town of Vaucluse.

Graniteville is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area, also known as the C.S.R.A. or Central Savannah River Area.

Hamburg, Aiken County, South Carolina

The ghost town of Hamburg, South Carolina, was once a thriving upriver market located in Edgefield District (now Aiken County) of the Piedmont. It was founded by Henry Shultz in 1821, across the Savannah River from Augusta, Georgia, in direct competition with that city (Cordle 1940:82). In its heyday, 60,000 bales of cotton worth $2,000,000 were brought by wagon to Hamburg each year (Chapman 1897:237). This cotton continued by pole boat or steam boat to the ports of Charleston or Savannah for subsequent shipment to manufacturers in New England or Europe. Hamburg lost business after Augusta completed its canal in 1848.

After the American Civil War, Hamburg was repopulated mostly by freedmen and was within newly organized Aiken County. It became notorious in July 1876 as the site of a massacre of blacks by whites in what was one of a number of violent incidents by Democratic paramilitary groups to suppress black voting in that year's elections. The Democrats regained control of the state government and federal troops were withdrawn the next year from South Carolina and other states, ending the Reconstruction era.

Jackson, South Carolina

Jackson is a town in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 1,700 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area.

Langley, South Carolina

Langley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 1,447 at the 2010 census. It is bordered by Gloverville to the northeast and Burnettown to the west.

Langley is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area. Langley is located in historic Horse Creek Valley. It sits aside Langley Pond, which is named after the town, as the town contains the dam.

The community was named after Langley, in England.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Aiken County, South Carolina

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Aiken County, South Carolina.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen on a map.There are 40 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including 1 National Historic Landmark.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted May 17, 2019.

New Ellenton, South Carolina

New Ellenton is a city in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 2,052 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area.

Perry, South Carolina

Perry is a town in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 233 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area.

Redcliffe Plantation State Historic Site

Redcliffe Plantation State Historic Site is a state park in South Carolina, United States. Redcliffe Plantation, also known as Redcliffe, completed in 1859, is a Greek Revival plantation house located on the site that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The house was designed by the baron Louis Berckmans and was built in 1857. It was built for James Henry Hammond and was home to three generations of his descendants. His great-grandson John Shaw Billings, editor of Time, Life, and Fortune magazines, donated the estate and collections to the people of South Carolina in 1973. The same year it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Ronnie Young

Ronald Young (August 19, 1947 – May 19, 2019) was an American politician.

Young graduated from the Langley-Bath-Clearwater High School. He served on the Aiken County School Board. He was a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives, who represented the 84th district as a Republican. He was elected to the House via a special election after the resignation of Chris Corley. Previously, Young served as chairman of the Aiken County, South Carolina Council since 1994, and as a member for 26 years.Young, who had been in hospice care due to pancreatic cancer, liver cancer and a stroke suffered weeks prior, died on May 19, 2019 at the age of 71.

Salley, South Carolina

Salley is a town in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 398 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area. Salley is known for hosting the Chitlin Strut, a town-wide festival, every November.

Wagener, South Carolina

Wagener is a town in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 797 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area.

Warrenville, South Carolina

Warrenville is a census-designated place (CDP) in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 1,233 at the 2010 census. It is located just south of Graniteville and is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area. Warrenville is located in historic Horse Creek Valley.

Windsor, South Carolina

Windsor is a town in Aiken County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 121 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area.

Places adjacent to Aiken County, South Carolina
Municipalities and communities of Aiken County, South Carolina, United States
Cities
Towns
CDPs
Unincorporated
communities
Ghost town
Footnotes
Colleges and universities in Central Savannah River Area
Regions
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Smaller cities
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