Ahmed Dokhi

Ahmad Al-Dokhi Al-Dossary (Arabic: أحمد الدوخي‎) (born 25 October 1976) is a former Saudi Arabian footballer who last played as a defender for Al-Nassr.

Ahmad Al-Dokhi
Ahmad Al-Dokhi
Personal information
Full name Ahmad Al-Dokhi Al-Dossary
Date of birth 25 October 1976 (age 42)[1]
Place of birth Riyadh, Saudi Arabia[2]
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Playing position Defender
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1995–2005 Al-Hilal
2005–2008 Al-Ittihad
2008–2009 Qatar SC
2009–2011 Al-Nassr 29 (1)
National team
1997–2006 Saudi Arabia 113 (1)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 13 June 2006
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 23 June 2006

Club Career

Al-Dokhi was part of the Al-Hilal team that won the AFC Club Championship and AFC Super Cup in 2000. He then moved on to Al-Ittihad and helped them lift the AFC Champions League in 2005.

Al-Nassr

In 11 August 2009, Al-Nassr signed Ahmad Al-Dokhi with a one-year contract[3]. In 30 January 2010, Ahmad played his debut against Al-Ahli[4]. In 10 December 2010, he assisted Saad Al-Harthi to make him score against Najran, they won 6-1. In 29 April 2011, He was sent in the 91 minute against Al-Ettifaq. In 20 May 2011, Ahmad Al-Dokhi scored his first goal for Al-Nassr in his last league match against Al-Ittihad which he lost 2-5. He retired in 2011.

International Career

He was a member of the Saudi Arabian national team and was called up to the squad in 1998, 2002 and 2006 FIFA World Cups.[5]

Hounors

Al-Hilal

Ittihad

Qatar SC

References

  1. ^ Ahmed DokhiFIFA competition record
  2. ^ http://issuu.com/s_gramosli/docs/panini_album_2002
  3. ^ http://www.sauress.com/ajl/8583
  4. ^ https://www.slstat.com/spl2009-2010ar/matchdet.php?id=120
  5. ^ Ahmed DokhiFIFA competition record

External links

Ahmed Dokhi at National-Football-Teams.com

1997 FIFA Confederations Cup Group A

Group A of the 1997 FIFA Confederations Cup took place between 12 and 16 December 1997. Brazil won the group, and advanced to the knockout stage, along with group runners-up Australia. Mexico and Saudi Arabia failed to advance.

1998 FIFA World Cup Group C

At the 1998 FIFA World Cup, the 32 teams were divided into eight groups of four, labelled A–H. Group C was composed of Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Denmark and host nation France.

Denmark and France started well, defeating Saudi Arabia and South Africa respectively. Next, France scored four to eliminate Saudi Arabia and qualify with a match to spare, while Denmark and South Africa drew. Needing a big win in their final game, against Saudi Arabia, South Africa conceded two penalties and could only draw, so Denmark still qualified despite losing their final game to France.

1998 FIFA World Cup squads

The 1998 FIFA World Cup was the 16th FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial football tournament contested by the senior men's teams of the national associations affiliated to FIFA (the International Federation of Association Football). The tournament was played in France from 10 June to 12 July 1998 and featured 32 teams divided into eight groups of four. Each team was required to submit a squad of 22 players – numbered sequentially from 1 to 22 – from whom they would select their teams for each match at the tournament, with the final squads to be submitted by 1 June 1998. In total, 704 players were selected for the tournament.

Players' ages as of 10 June 1998 – the tournament's opening day.

2000 AFC Asian Cup

The 2000 AFC Asian Cup was the 12th edition of the men's AFC Asian Cup, a quadrennial international football tournament organised by the Asian Football Confederation (AFC). The finals were held in Lebanon between 12 and 29 October 2000. Japan defeated defending champion Saudi Arabia in the final match in Beirut.

2000 AFC Asian Cup squads

Squads for the 2000 AFC Asian Cup played in Lebanon from 12 to 29 October 2000.

2002 FIFA World Cup Group E

Play in Group E of the 2002 FIFA World Cup completed on 11 June 2002. Germany won the group, and advanced to the second round, along with the Republic of Ireland. Cameroon and Saudi Arabia failed to advance.

2002 FIFA World Cup squads

At the 2002 FIFA World Cup, each national association was required to name a squad of 23 players, expanded from 22 in previous tournaments.

The players' ages, caps and clubs are as of 31 May 2002, the opening day of the tournament.

2004 AFC Asian Cup squads

Squads for the 2004 AFC Asian Cup played in China from 17 July to 7 August 2004.

2005 FIFA Club World Championship squads

Here are the rosters which took part on the 2005 FIFA Club World Championship, held on Japan, between 11 December and 18 December 2005.

2006 FIFA World Cup Group H

Play in Group H of the 2006 FIFA World Cup began on 14 June and completed on 23 June 2006. Spain won the group, and advanced to the second round, along with Ukraine. Tunisia and Saudi Arabia failed to advance.

2006 FIFA World Cup qualification – AFC Second Stage Group 8

The 2006 FIFA World Cup qualification AFC Second Stage Group 8 was an AFC qualifying group for the 2006 FIFA World Cup. The group was composed of Saudi Arabia, Turkmenistan, Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

The group was won by Saudi Arabia, who qualified for the third stage.

2006 FIFA World Cup squads

This article lists the confirmed national football squads for the 2006 FIFA World Cup tournament held in Germany, between 9 June and 9 July 2006. Before announcing their final squad, several teams named a provisional squad of 23 to 33 players, but each country's final squad of 23 players had to be submitted by 15 May 2006. Replacement of injured players was permitted until 24 hours before the team's first World Cup game. Players marked (c) were named as captain for their national squad. Number of caps counts until the start of the World Cup, including all pre-tournament friendlies. Club information is that used by FIFA. Players for whom this information changed during or in the run up to the tournament are indicated by footnotes.

2009–10 Al-Nassr FC season

In this article, the results of Al-Nassr FC Club of Saudi Arabia in 2009-2010 season is summarized

2010–11 Al-Nassr FC season

In this article, the results of Al Nassr Club of Saudi Arabia in 2010-2011 season is summarized.

Al-Ittihad Club (Jeddah)

Al-Ittihad Club Saudi Arabia (Arabic: نادي الاتحاد العربي السعودي‎), also known as Al-Ittihad Jeddah or simply Al-Ittihad, meaning The Union, is a Saudi Premier League football club based in Jeddah. Al-Ittihad has won 8 League titles and also holds 48 official championship wins, three of them being Asian championships.

The club was founded on January 4, 1927 before the third Saudi state was declared, making it the oldest club in Saudi Arabia. The most successful period in Al-Ittihad's history was the 1990s and mid 2000s, when the club won numerous honours both domestically and continental. The team won Cup Winners Cup in 1999 and two Champions League titles in 2004 and 2005 and as far as going on to compete in the 2005 FIFA Club World Cup. The club has the distinction of being the only Asian club to have won the AFC Champions League twice in a row.

Al-Ittihad has a record of home average attendance for Asia clubs in domestic league matches with the average of 42,371 on 2014/2015 season and that is for the club's big popularity which is the first in Saudi Arabia And Asia.

The club's most famous Saudi players are Saeed Ghorab, Hamzah Idris, Ahmad Jamil, Al Hasan Al-Yami, Mohammed Noor and with the most famous foreign players being the famous Brazilian international player Bebeto who played for Al-Ittihad from 2001 to 2002, the Brazilian Attacking Midfielder Tcheco who played for Al-Ittihad from 2003 to 2005 and came back on in 2008 for one season and the portuguese Paulo Jorge Alves, also known as Jójó, who starred in Al- Ittihad from 2010 to 2012.

In May 2015, Al-Ittihad entered The Guinness Book Of Records, as the first and only Saudi Arabian/Asian club entering it, because the club had won 232 different local and regional championships in games in Mansour Albalawi's reign as a chairman of the club from 2002 to 2008, and for back-to-back wins of the AFC Champions League in 2004 and 2005, as the only Asian team to accomplish it.

France at the FIFA World Cup

This is a record of France's results at the FIFA World Cup. France was one of the four European teams that participated at the inaugural World Cup in 1930 and have appeared in 15 FIFA World Cups, tied for the sixth most of any country.

The national team is one of eight to have won the FIFA World Cup title and one of only six to have done so more than once.The French team won its first World Cup title in 1998. The tournament was played on home soil and France defeated Brazil 3–0 in the final match. The tournament was hosted in France once before in 1938, where France was eliminated by defending champions Italy in the quarter finals.

In 2006, France finished as runners-up, losing on penalties (5–3) to Italy after the game was tied 1–1 after 120 minutes. The team has also finished in third place on two occasions, in 1958 and 1986, and in fourth place once, in 1982. In 2018 France won the World Cup for the second time 4–2 against Croatia in Luzhniki Stadium, Russia.

October 25

October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 67 days remaining until the end of the year.

Tunisia at the FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup, sometimes called the Football World Cup or the Soccer World Cup, but usually referred to simply as the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the men's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the first tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946, due to World War II.

The tournament consists of two parts, the qualification phase and the final phase (officially called the World Cup Finals). The qualification phase, which currently take place over the three years preceding the Finals, is used to determine which teams qualify for the Finals. The current format of the Finals involves 32 teams competing for the title, at venues within the host nation (or nations) over a period of about a month. The World Cup Finals is the most widely viewed sporting event in the world, with an estimated 715.1 million people watching the 2006 tournament final.

Tunisia have appeared in the finals of the FIFA World Cup on five occasions, the first being at the 1978 FIFA World Cup where they finished in ninth position. Between 1998 and 2006 they had a streak of three World Cup qualifications. They have made their fifth appearance at the finals in the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia.

Ukraine at the FIFA World Cup

This is a record of Ukraine's results at the FIFA World Cup. The FIFA World Cup, sometimes called the Football World Cup or the Soccer World Cup, but usually referred to simply as the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the men's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the first tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946, due to World War II.

The tournament consists of two parts, the qualification phase and the final phase (officially called the World Cup Finals). The qualification phase, which currently take place over the three years preceding the Finals, is used to determine which teams qualify for the Finals. The current format of the Finals involves 32 teams competing for the title, at venues within the host nation (or nations) over a period of about a month. The World Cup Finals is the most widely viewed sporting event in the world, with an estimated 715.1 million people watching the 2006 tournament final.Ukraine have appeared in the finals of the FIFA World Cup on one occasion in 2006 where they reached the quarter finals. It was their first ever official appearance at international finals since breaking away from the Soviet Union in 1991. However, before 1996 some of its players played for the Soviet Union national football team and CIS national football team. Among few there were Oleksiy Mykhaylychenko, Hennadiy Lytovchenko, Oleh Luzhny, Ivan Hetsko and others.

Saudi Arabia Squads

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