Ahmad Brooks

Ahmad Kadar Brooks (born March 14, 1984) is an American former football outside linebacker. He played college football at Virginia, and was drafted by the Cincinnati Bengals in the third round of the 2006 NFL Supplemental Draft. He has also played for the San Francisco 49ers and Green Bay Packers.

Ahmad Brooks
refer to caption
Brooks with the San Francisco 49ers in 2012
No. 50, 55
Position:Outside linebacker
Personal information
Born:March 15, 1984 (age 35)
Fairfax, Virginia
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:259 lb (117 kg)
Career information
High school:Dale City (VA) Hylton
College:Virginia
Supplemental draft:2006 / Round: 3
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Total tackles:389
Sacks:55.0
Pass deflections:32
Interceptions:3
Forced fumbles:12
Defensive touchdowns:1
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years and personal

Brooks attended C. D. Hylton High School in Woodbridge, Virginia, which he helped lead to two VHSL state championships during his three-year tenure (1999–2001). Brooks battled injuries throughout his high school career, but he had a very productive year in 2001—he had 207 tackles (144 solos), including 34 for loss, and he also rushed for 848 yards and 10 touchdowns while averaging 12.6 yards per carry. The semifinal loss to Thomas Dale High School of Chester, Virginia in 2001 was the only Hylton loss in three years in which he played. He was named as USA Today's National Defensive Player of the year after the 2001 season. He participated in the 2002 U.S. Army All-American Bowl game.

Considered a five-star recruit by Rivals.com, Brooks was listed as the No. 1 outside linebacker in the nation in 2002.[1]

His father, former Washington Redskins defensive tackle Perry Brooks, died in March 2010.[2]

College career

Following high school, Brooks spent one year at Hargrave Military Academy in Chatham, Virginia a military post-graduate school before enrolling in the University of Virginia in the fall of 2003, where he played for the Virginia Cavaliers football team. He earned a starting position as a freshman and finished the year with a career-high and team-leading 117 tackles. He also had four sacks, six passes defensed, 10 tackles-for-loss and 15 quarterback pressures. He had a career-high 12 tackles vs. Pittsburgh in the Continental Tire Bowl, including a key stop early in the contest to complete a goal-line stand.

During his sophomore year at the University of Virginia he was one of three Butkus Award finalists, which goes to the best linebacker in the country. He played in 12 games, earning All-America honors after totaling a team-leading 90 tackles, with eight sacks, two interceptions, 11 quarterback pressures and 10 tackles-for-loss. Earned Atlantic Coast Conference Defensive Lineman of the Week honors for his performance against the Maryland Terrapins.

He played in six games as a junior, with 27 tackles (10 solo), including one sack, plus four passes defensed and five quarterback pressures. He missed games 1-3 while rehabbing from knee surgery performed following his sophomore campaign. He missed other games due to various injuries throughout the 2005 season. He was involved in several off-field problems and was eventually dismissed from the team following the season.

Professional career

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad
6 ft 3 78 in
(1.93 m)
249 lb
(113 kg)
4.64 s
All values from NFL combine[3]

Cincinnati Bengals

Brooks entered the NFL Supplemental Draft following his junior season at Virginia and was selected by the Bengals in the third round on July 13, 2006. He made his NFL debut September 24 at Pittsburgh (no statistics). As a rookie, he played in 11 contests (Games 3-9, 11-12, and 16), with starts at Middle Linebacker in Games 5-9. He had 46 tackles, with one sack, 2 passes defended, and one special teams tackle.

In the 2007 season opener on Monday Night Football against the Baltimore Ravens, Brooks was the starter. Brooks ended the game with six tackles, a sack, and a forced fumble. In the first series of the game against the Cleveland Browns in week 2, Brooks tore his groin muscle, which ended his season.[4] He was placed on injured reserve on November 7, 2007.[5]

Brooks was waived by the Bengals on August 30, 2008 during the final roster cuts.[6]

San Francisco 49ers

On August 31, 2008, Brooks was claimed off waivers by the San Francisco 49ers. The team released linebacker Dontarrious Thomas to make room for Brooks. The 49ers waived Brooks on November 29 to make room for wide receiver Chris Hannon, but re-signed Brooks on December 2 after Hannon was waived. On December 2, 2009, San Francisco 49ers head coach Mike Singletary mentioned that Brooks would be used increasingly during pass rushing situations.[7] In week 14, Brooks recorded single-game career-highs of 3 sacks and 2 forced fumbles against the Arizona Cardinals.

Brooks recorded career highs in both tackles (50) and sacks (7) during the 2011 Regular Season. He led the 49ers into the postseason where they lost to the New York Giants in the NFC Championship.

On February 28, 2012, Brooks signed a six-year contract extension worth $44.5 million, with $17.5 million guaranteed. During the 2012 season, Brooks had 35 tackles, 2 forced fumbles, an interception, 6.5 sacks, and 6 passes defended in 16 games started. He again led the 49ers into the postseason and this time, Super Bowl XLVII but the 49ers lost to the Baltimore Ravens by a score of 31–34.[8]

On November 20, 2013, Brooks was fined $15,750 by the NFL for a controversial roughing the passer penalty in which Brooks struck the neck of New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, the same quarterback off whom he scored his first touchdown. This fine was later overturned.[9]

On December 13, 2015, during a game with the Cleveland Browns, Brooks was disqualified from the game due to excessive aggression and blatant personal fouls against the other players.

Brooks was released by the 49ers on August 25, 2017.[10]

Green Bay Packers

On September 3, 2017, Brooks signed a one-year deal with the Green Bay Packers.[11]

NFL statistics

Regular season

Year Team GP GS Tackles Interceptions Fumbles
Total Solo Ast Sck SFTY PDef Int Yds Avg Lng TDs FF FR
2006 CIN 11 5 31 21 10 1.0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2007 CIN 2 2 6 5 1 1.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
2009 SF 14 0 21 20 1 6.0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
2008 SF 15 1 31 29 2 5.0 0 2 1 32 32.0 32 0 0 0
2011 SF 16 16 50 35 15 7.0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
2012 SF 16 16 46 34 12 6.5 0 6 1 50 50.0 50 1 2 0
2013 SF 16 16 60 52 8 8.5 0 7 1 22 22.0 22 0 1 1
2014 SF 13 13 30 25 5 6.0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
2015 SF 14 14 42 28 14 6.5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2016 SF 16 16 53 41 12 6.0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
2017 GB 12 5 19 13 6 1.5 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 145 104 389 303 86 55.0 0 32 3 104 0 50 1 12 2
Source: NFL.com

Postseason

Year Team GP GS Tackles Interceptions Fumbles
Total Solo Ast Sck SFTY PDef Int Yds Avg Lng TDs FF FR
2011 SF 2 2 6 4 2 1.0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2012 SF 3 3 7 7 0 1.0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2013 SF 3 3 15 11 4 4.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Total 8 8 28 22 6 6.5 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Source: pro-football-reference.com

References

  1. ^ Ahmad Brooks Recruiting Profile
  2. ^ Redskins DT Perry Brooks Passes Away
  3. ^ "Ahmad Brooks - 2006 NFL Draft Scout Player Profile", NFLDraftScout.com
  4. ^ "Ahmad Brooks profile". Sports.aol.com. Retrieved November 28, 2008.
  5. ^ "NFL Transactions Report". NFL.com. Archived from the original on November 19, 2008. Retrieved November 28, 2008.
  6. ^ Huber, Bill. "Packers Look to Ahmad Brooks to Bolster OLB Corps". Packers Report. Retrieved December 8, 2017.
  7. ^ FitzGerald, Tom (December 2, 2009). "Brooks gets chance as pass rusher". The San Francisco Chronicle.
  8. ^ "Super Bowl XLVII - San Francisco 49ers vs. Baltimore Ravens - February 3rd, 2013". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  9. ^ Rosenthal, Gregg (November 20, 2013). "Ahmad Brooks fined $15,750 by NFL for Drew Brees hit". National Football League. Retrieved November 20, 2013.
  10. ^ "49ers Release LB Ahmad Brooks". 49ers.com. August 25, 2017.
  11. ^ "Packers sign LB Brooks, claim LB Odom, place OL Barclay on IR". Packers.com. September 3, 2017.

External links

2004 College Football All-America Team

The 2004 College Football All-America Team is composed of the following All-American Teams: Associated Press (AP), Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), Walter Camp Football Foundation, The Sporting News, Sports Illustrated, Pro Football Weekly, ESPN, CBS Sports, College Football News, and Rivals.com.

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions. The original usage of the term All-America seems to have been to such a list selected by football pioneer Walter Camp in the 1890s. The NCAA officially recognizes All-Americans selected by the AP, AFCA, FWAA, SN, and the WCFF to determine Consensus All-Americans.

2012 All-Pro Team

There are three 2012 All-Pro Teams—one each named by the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Writers Association (PFWA), and Sporting News—for performance in the 2012 NFL season. While none of these have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2013 Pro Bowl), they are included (separately) in the NFL Record and Fact Book. Any player selected to any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro."

The AP team, with first- and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of 50 NFL writers; the Sporting News selection process used a panel of 27 NFL coaches and executives, while the PFWA team is chosen by polling its 300+ members.

2013 All-Pro Team

The 2013 All-Pro Teams were named by the Associated Press (AP) the Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), and the Sporting News (SN) for performance in the 2013 NFL season. While none of the All-Pro teams have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2014 Pro Bowl), they are included in the NFL Record and Fact Book. Any player selected to any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro". The AP team, with first-team and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of fifty NFL writers. The Sporting News All-NFL team is voted on by NFL players and executives and was released January 28, 2014. The PFWA team is selected by its more than 300 national members who are accredited media members covering the NFL.

2013 San Francisco 49ers season

The 2013 San Francisco 49ers season was the franchise's 64th season in the National Football League, the 68th overall and the third under the head coach/general manager tandem of Jim Harbaugh and Trent Baalke. This was the 49ers' final season playing their home games at Candlestick Park before moving into Levi's Stadium for the 2014 season.

The 49ers entered the season as the defending NFC champions, qualified for the playoffs as the fifth seed Wild Card, and hoped to win a sixth Super Bowl title, after falling just short during the previous season. The 49ers' defeated the Green Bay Packers 23-20 in the Wild Card round and the Carolina Panthers 23-10 in the Divisional round, but lost to the Seattle Seahawks in the NFC Championship by a score of 23-17.

The 2013 season is the last season to date in which the San Francisco 49ers qualified for the playoffs.

2016 Liberty Bowl (January)

The 2016 Liberty Bowl was a post-season American college football bowl game played on January 2, 2016 at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in Memphis, Tennessee. The 57th edition of the Liberty Bowl featured the Kansas State Wildcats of the Big 12 Conference against the Arkansas Razorbacks of the Southeastern Conference. It began at 2:20 p.m. CST and aired on ESPN. It was one of the 2015–16 bowl games that concluded the 2015 FBS football season. Sponsored by automobile parts and accessories store AutoZone, it is officially known as the AutoZone Liberty Bowl.

2016 Music City Bowl

The 2016 Music City Bowl was an American college football bowl game played on December 30, 2016 at Nissan Stadium in Nashville, Tennessee. It featured the Tennessee Volunteers, from the Southeastern Conference (SEC), and the Nebraska Cornhuskers, from the Big Ten Conference. It was one of the 2016–17 bowl games of the 2016 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The game was sponsored by the Franklin American Mortgage Company and was officially known as the Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl.

2017 Green Bay Packers season

The 2017 Green Bay Packers season was their 99th season overall, 97th season in the National Football League, and the 12th under head coach Mike McCarthy. After reaching the NFC Championship Game in the previous season, the Packers failed to improve a 10–6 record from 2016 and were eliminated from postseason contention after Week 15, making this the first time since 2008 that they failed to make the playoffs. After a 4-1 start, the Packers lost starting quarterback Aaron Rodgers to a collarbone injury during the week 6 game against the Minnesota Vikings, and went on to lose 8 of the 11 remaining games. A loss to the Lions in week 17 secured the Packers’ first losing season since 2008.

The Packers' opponents in this season were almost identical to that of their 2005 season in which the team finished 4-12; this season the Packers faced the Seattle Seahawks, and teams from the NFC South & AFC North. The lone difference between these two seasons was that the team faced the Dallas Cowboys, replacing the Philadelphia Eagles, as the Cowboys won the NFC East in 2016.

2017 Independence Bowl

The 2017 Independence Bowl was a college football bowl game played on December 27, 2017, at Independence Stadium in Shreveport, Louisiana. The 42nd annual Independence Bowl featured the Southern Miss Golden Eagles of Conference USA against the Florida State Seminoles of the Atlantic Coast Conference. Sponsored by Walk-On's Bistreaux & Bar, the game was officially known as the Walk-On's Independence Bowl.

The contest was televised on ESPN, with kickoff at 1:30 PM (EST). It was one of the 2017–18 bowl games concluding the 2017 FBS football season. Florida State defeated Southern Miss, 42–13.

2017 New Mexico Bowl

The 2017 New Mexico Bowl was a postseason college football bowl game played at Dreamstyle Stadium in Albuquerque, New Mexico on December 16, 2017. The game was the 12th edition of the New Mexico Bowl and featured the Marshall Thundering Herd of Conference USA and the Colorado State Rams of the Mountain West Conference. Sponsored by clothing company Gildan, the game was officially known as the 2017 Gildan New Mexico Bowl.

2018 Music City Bowl

The 2018 Music City Bowl was a college football bowl game played on December 28, 2018 at Nissan Stadium in Nashville, Tennessee. It was the 21st edition of the Music City Bowl, and one of the 2018–19 bowl games concluding the 2018 FBS football season. Sponsored by the Franklin American Mortgage Company, the game was officially known as the Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl.

The game was projected to be a close game, however Auburn jumped off to an early 21–0 lead. Purdue then put a touchdown on the board to make it 21–7, but Auburn then scored 35 unanswered points to end the half. The halftime score was 56–7, with Auburn setting the NCAA FBS record for points scored in any half of a bowl game. The final score of the game was 63–14.

List of First Responder Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast college football's First Responder Bowl throughout the years.

List of Independence Bowl broadcasters

This is a list of Independence Bowl broadcasters. The Independence Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division I college football bowl game that is played annually at Independence Stadium in Shreveport, Louisiana.

List of Liberty Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast college football's Liberty Bowl throughout the years.

List of Music City Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast college football's Music City Bowl throughout the years.

List of NFL supplemental draft picks

There have been 45 players selected in the National Football League supplemental draft since its inception in 1977. The supplemental draft was enacted in 1977 for players who had various circumstances affect their eligibility and did not enter the main NFL draft. The only player selected in the supplemental draft to enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame was Cris Carter, who was selected in 1987 and elected to the Hall of Fame in 2013. In addition, there have been eight players selected to Pro Bowls in their careers: Bernie Kosar (drafted in 1985), Cris Carter (1987), Bobby Humphrey (1989), Rob Moore (1990), Mike Wahle (1998), Jamal Williams (1998), Ahmad Brooks (2006), and Josh Gordon (2012).

In 1984, the National Football League held a supplemental draft for college seniors who had already signed with either the United States Football League or the Canadian Football League. On June 5 in New York City, the draft was completed in an attempt to head off a bidding war in its own ranks for USFL and CFL players. Three players in this draft entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame: Steve Young, Gary Zimmerman, and Reggie White.

List of New Mexico Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast college football's New Mexico Bowl throughout the years.

Perry Brooks

Perry Brooks (December 4, 1954 – March 1, 2010) was an American football defensive tackle in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins. He played college football at Southern University and was drafted in the seventh round of the 1976 NFL Draft by the New England Patriots. He is the father of linebacker Ahmad Brooks.

After his career ended, Brooks served as a salesman at Cowles Nissan in Woodbridge, Virginia.

Quin Blanding

Quin Blanding (born May 1, 1996) is an American football safety for the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Virginia. He signed with the Washington Redskins as an undrafted free agent in 2018.

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