AgfaPhoto

AgfaPhoto GmbH is a European photographic company, formed in 2004 when Agfa-Gevaert sold their Consumer Imaging division. Agfa (the former parent company, which merged with film manufacturer Gevaert in 1964) had for many years been well known as a producer of consumer-oriented photographic products including films, photographic papers and cameras. However, within a year of the sell-off, AgfaPhoto had filed for bankruptcy.[1]

The various product brands are now being licensed to various companies by the holding firm AgfaPhoto Holding GmbH. Minilab service and chemicals are e.g. now sold by A&O Imaging Solutions, and AgfaPhoto Vista Brand Film is sold by Lupus Imaging & Media.

AgfaPhoto-Logo
AgfaPhoto logo
Agfaphoto Vista plus 200 135 film cartridge (02)
A 135 film canister of AgfaPhoto Vista Plus film with information regarding the usage of the brand.

Management buyout

In 2004, Agfa-Gevaert announced that it had reached a definitive agreement to divest the whole of its Consumer Imaging business in a management buyout for a purchase price of €175.5 million. The divestment covered the whole of its Consumer Imaging business, including film, finishing products, and lab equipment, grouped in a new company – AgfaPhoto GmbH, as well as the related lease portfolio, in a management buyout. The targeted closing date of the transaction was November 1, 2004.

The transaction resulted in a non-cash book loss to Agfa-Gevaert of €430 million, but was cash positive to the extent of €260 million. While the trading environment for both HealthCare and Graphic System divisions improved considerably, the group's half year results were heavily affected by the expected book loss on the divestiture of Consumer Imaging.

AgfaPhoto Holding GmbH

The AgfaPhoto Holding GmbH, headquartered in Leverkusen and Cologne/Germany, is dealing internationally in the consumer imaging sector. Based on a long-term trademark agreement with Agfa-Gevaert NV & Co. KG and Agfa-Gevaert NV, the company is granting sublicenses for the AgfaPhoto-trademark and the Red-Dot-Logo.

The following consumer imaging products are offered already with the AgfaPhoto trademark: Digital Cameras & Camcorder, Analog Filmrolls & (Single Use-) Cameras, Flash Memory Cards & USB Drives, Mobile Energy Products, Digital Photo Frames, Minilabs incl. Service & Spare Parts, Optical & Magnetic Storage Media, LCD TV, DVD Players, Pocket Projectors, Binoculars, Cleaning Products, Ink Cartridges, Photo Paper

The official claim of the brand: "AgfaPhoto is the personal companion that lets consumers experience the world of images in all its exciting facets and turns the special moments in life into lasting and shareable memories."

See also

References

  1. ^ AgfaPhoto files for insolvency, dpreview.com. Article dated 2005-05-27, retrieved 2007-03-04.

External links

Agfa-Gevaert

Agfa-Gevaert N.V. (Agfa) is a Belgian-German multinational corporation that develops, manufactures, and distributes analogue and digital imaging products and systems, as well as IT solutions. The company has three divisions. Agfa Graphics offers integrated prepress and industrial inkjet systems to the printing and graphics industries. Agfa HealthCare supplies hospitals and other care organisations with imaging products and systems, as well as information systems. Agfa Specialty Products supplies products to various industrial markets. It is part of the Agfa Materials organization. In addition to the Agfa Specialty Products activities, Agfa Materials also supplies film and related products to Agfa Graphics and Agfa HealthCare.

Agfa film and cameras were once prominent consumer products. However, in 2004, the consumer imaging division was sold to a company founded via management buyout. AgfaPhoto GmbH, as the new company was called, filed for bankruptcy after just one year. The brands are now licensed to other companies by AgfaPhoto Holding GmbH, a holding firm. Following this sale, Agfa-Gevaert's commerce today is 100% business-to-business.

Agfa (disambiguation)

Agfa can refer to:

Agfa (nematode), a genus of nematode in the family Agfidae

Agfa-Gevaert, an imaging technologies company listed on the Euronext stock exchange

AgfaPhoto, a defunct photographic products company (formed when Agfa-Gevaert's consumer imaging division was spun off), now used as a licensed brand

Digital photography

Digital photography uses cameras containing arrays of electronic photodetectors to capture images focused by a lens, as opposed to an exposure on photographic film. The captured images are digitized and stored as a computer file ready for further digital processing, viewing, digital publishing or printing.

Until the advent of such technology, photographs were made by exposing light sensitive photographic film and paper, which was processed in liquid chemical solutions to develop and stabilize the image. Digital photographs are typically created solely by computer-based photoelectric and mechanical techniques, without wet bath chemical processing.

The first consumer digital cameras were marketed in the late 1990s. Professionals gravitated to digital slowly, and were won over when their professional work required using digital files to fulfill the demands of employers and/or clients, for faster turn-around than conventional methods would allow. Starting around 2007, digital cameras were incorporated in cell phones and in the following years, cell phone cameras became widespread, particularly due to their connectivity to social media websites and email. Since 2010, the digital point-and-shoot and DSLR formats have also seen competition from the mirrorless digital camera format, which typically provides better image quality than the point-and-shoot or cell phone formats but comes in a smaller size and shape than the typical DSLR. Many mirrorless cameras accept interchangeable lenses and have advanced features through an electronic viewfinder, which replaces the through-the-lens finder image of the SLR format.

General Imaging

General Imaging was a manufacturer of digital cameras headquartered in Torrance, California, established in 2006 by Hiroshi "Hugh" Komiya, a former executive of Olympus Corporation. General Imaging sold their cameras internationally under the General Electric name, used under license. In Japan, General Imaging was licensed to manufacture and sell their cameras under the AgfaPhoto name. General Imaging filed for bankruptcy on October 5, 2015.

Howard Blumenthal

Howard Blumenthal is an American television and new media producer, author, educator, and executive. Born and raised in New York City and nearby suburbs, he is the son of author and Concentration producer Norm Blumenthal, and the grandson of radio and music retailer Harry Blumenthal. He is best known as the co-creator and producer of the Peabody Award winning PBS series, Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?

Ilford Photo

Ilford Photo is a UK manufacturer of photographic materials known worldwide for its black-and-white film and papers and chemicals, as previously as its range of Ilfochrome and Ilfocolor colour printing materials, before these were discontinued. Ilfochrome was formerly called Cibachrome, developed in partnership with the Swiss company CIBA-Geigy. Formerly, it published the Ilford Manual of Photography, a comprehensive manual of everything photographic, including the optics, physics and chemistry of photography, along with recipes for many developers.

Leavitt Hunt

Col. Leavitt Hunt (1831–February 16, 1907) was a Harvard-educated attorney and photography pioneer who was one of the first people to photograph the Middle East. He and a companion, Nathan Flint Baker, traveled to Egypt, the Holy Land, Lebanon, Turkey and Greece on a Grand Tour in 1851–52, making one of the earliest photographic records of the Arab and ancient worlds, including the Great Sphinx and the Great Pyramid of Giza, views along the Nile River, the ruins at Petra and the Parthenon in Greece.

List of digital camera brands

This is a list of digital camera brands. Former and current brands are included in this list. With some of the brands, the name is licensed from another company, or acquired after the bankruptcy of an older photographic equipment company. The actual manufacture of a camera model is performed by a different company in many cases. In many cases brands are limited to certain countries. Not all brands of devices that can take digital images are listed here, including many industrial digital camera brands, some webcam brands, brands of cell phones that feature cameras, and brands of video cameras that can take digital stills. Defunct brands are listed separately.

List of discontinued photographic films

All the still camera films on this page have either been discontinued, have been updated or the company making the film no longer exists. Often films will be updated and older versions discontinued without any change in the name.

Photographic films for still cameras that are currently available are in the List of photographic films. Films for movie making are included in the List of motion picture film stocks.

List of photographic equipment makers

This list of photographic equipment makers lists companies that manufacture (or license manufacture from other companies) equipment for photography.

List of photographic films

This is a list of currently available photographic films in a still camera film format. This includes recently discontinued films that remain available from stock at main suppliers. Films are listed by Brand name. Still camera photographic films no longer in production (or available) are included in the List of discontinued photographic films. Films for movie making are included in the List of motion picture film stocks.

Photographic film

Photographic film is a strip or sheet of transparent plastic film base coated on one side with a gelatin emulsion containing microscopically small light-sensitive silver halide crystals. The sizes and other characteristics of the crystals determine the sensitivity, contrast and resolution of the film.The emulsion will gradually darken if left exposed to light, but the process is too slow and incomplete to be of any practical use. Instead, a very short exposure to the image formed by a camera lens is used to produce only a very slight chemical change, proportional to the amount of light absorbed by each crystal. This creates an invisible latent image in the emulsion, which can be chemically developed into a visible photograph. In addition to visible light, all films are sensitive to ultraviolet, X-rays and high-energy particles. Unmodified silver halide crystals are sensitive only to the blue part of the visible spectrum, producing unnatural-looking renditions of some colored subjects. This problem was resolved with the discovery that certain dyes, called sensitizing dyes, when adsorbed onto the silver halide crystals made them respond to other colors as well. First orthochromatic (sensitive to blue and green) and finally panchromatic (sensitive to all visible colors) films were developed. Panchromatic film renders all colors in shades of gray approximately matching their subjective brightness. By similar techniques, special-purpose films can be made sensitive to the infrared (IR) region of the spectrum.In black-and-white photographic film, there is usually one layer of silver halide crystals. When the exposed silver halide grains are developed, the silver halide crystals are converted to metallic silver, which blocks light and appears as the black part of the film negative. Color film has at least three sensitive layers, incorporating different combinations of sensitizing dyes. Typically the blue-sensitive layer is on top, followed by a yellow filter layer to stop any remaining blue light from affecting the layers below. Next comes a green-and-blue sensitive layer, and a red-and-blue sensitive layer, which record the green and red images respectively. During development, the exposed silver halide crystals are converted to metallic silver, just as with black-and-white film. But in a color film, the by-products of the development reaction simultaneously combine with chemicals known as color couplers that are included either in the film itself or in the developer solution to form colored dyes. Because the by-products are created in direct proportion to the amount of exposure and development, the dye clouds formed are also in proportion to the exposure and development. Following development, the silver is converted back to silver halide crystals in the bleach step. It is removed from the film during the process of fixing the image on the film with a solution of ammonium thiosulfate or sodium thiosulfate (hypo or fixer). Fixing leaves behind only the formed color dyes, which combine to make up the colored visible image. Later color films, like Kodacolor II, have as many as 12 emulsion layers, with upwards of 20 different chemicals in each layer.

Timeline of photography technology

The following list comprises significant milestones in the development of photography technology.

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