Agabus

Agabus /ˈæɡəbəs/ (Greek: Ἄγαβος) was an early follower of Christianity mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles as a prophet. He is traditionally remembered as one of the Seventy Disciples described in Luke 10:1-24.

Agabus
Agabus
The Prophecy of Agabus by Louis Cheron
Prophet, Disciple, & Martyr
Born1st century AD
Antioch
Diedunknown
Antioch
Venerated inChristianity
FeastFebruary 13 (Roman Catholic)
March 8 (Eastern Orthodox)
Patronageprophets

Biblical and other traditional accounts

According to extra-biblical tradition, Agabus appears to have been a resident of Jerusalem. He is said to have been one of the seventy disciples, mentioned in the Gospel of Luke, commissioned to preach the gospel.[1] It is said that Agabus was with the twelve apostles in the upper room on the day of Pentecost.[2]

According to Acts 11:27-28, he was one of a group of prophets who travelled from Jerusalem to Antioch. Agabus had received the gift of prophecy, and predicted a severe famine which the author of Acts says occurred during the reign of the Roman Emperor Claudius.[3]

Also, according to Acts 21:10-12, 'a certain prophet', (Greek: τις) named Agabus met Paul the Apostle at Caesarea Maritima in 58 AD. He was, according to the Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary, 'no doubt the same' Agabus as had been mentioned in Acts 11:27-28,[4] and Heinrich Meyer stated that 'there is no reason against the assumed identity of this person with the one mentioned in Acts 11:28.[5] Agabus warned Paul of his coming capture; he bound his own hands and feet with Paul's belt to demonstrate what would happen if he continued his journey to Jerusalem, stating the message of the Holy Spirit:

So shall the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man who owns this belt, and deliver him into the hands of the Gentiles.

Paul, however, would not be persuaded to stay away.[3]

Agabus' symbolic action has been compared [6] with the Jewish prophet Jeremiah:

Thus the LORD said to me, "Go and buy yourself a linen waistband and put it around your waist, but do not put it in water." So I bought the waistband in accordance with the word of the LORD and put it around my waist ... For as a belt is bound around the waist, so I bound all the people of Israel and all the people of Judah to me,' declares the LORD, 'to be my people for my renown and praise and honor.[7]

Tradition says that Agabas went to many countries, teaching and converting many. This moved the Jews of Jerusalem to arrest him, and they tortured him by beating him severely, and putting a rope around his neck. He was dragged outside the city and stoned to death.[2] Maas says he was martyred at Antioch.[3]

Veneration

The Roman Catholic Church celebrates his feast day on February 13, while the Eastern Christianity celebrates it on March 8.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ David Miall Edwards, in International Standard Bible Encyclopedia entry: Agabus http://biblehub.com/topical/a/agabus.htm accessed 24 September 2015
  2. ^ a b "The Martyrdom of St. Agabus, One of the Seventy Disciples", Coptic Orthodox Church Network
  3. ^ a b c d Wikisource-logo.svg Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1907). "Agabus" . Catholic Encyclopedia. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  4. ^ Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary on Acts 21 http://biblehub.com/commentaries/jfb/acts/21.htm accessed 15 October 2015
  5. ^ Meyer's NT Commentary on Acts 21 http://biblehub.com/commentaries/meyer/acts/21.htm accessed 15 October 2015
  6. ^ Expositor's Greek Testament on Acts 21 http://biblehub.com/commentaries/egt/acts/21.htm accessed 15 October 2015
  7. ^ Jeremiah 13:1-2;11
Agabus affinis

Agabus affinis is a species of beetle native to the Palearctic (including Europe) and the Near East. In Europe, it is only found in Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Great Britain including Shetland, Orkney, Hebrides and Isle of Man, Croatia, the Czech Republic, mainland Danmark, Estonia, Finland, mainland France, Germany, Hungary, the Republic of Ireland, mainland Italy, Kaliningrad, Latvia, Lithuania, Northern Ireland, mainland Norway, Poland, Russia except the South, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Ukraine, and Italy.

Agabus ambiguus

Agabus ambiguus is a species of predacious diving beetle belonging to the family Dytiscidae. This species occurs across the United States and Canada. It has been collected from depositional areas of springs, streams, and stream-fed ponds. Adults can be active in open water throughout winter.

Agabus bipustulatus

Agabus bipustulatus is a species of beetle native to the Palearctic (including Europe), the Afro-tropical region, the Near East and North Africa. In Europe, it is found everywhere except in several small countries and islands: the Canary Islands, Franz Josef Land, Gibraltar, Madeira, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, the North Aegean Islands, Novaya Zemlya, San Marino, the Selvagens Islands, Svalbard and Jan Mayen, and Vatican City.

Agabus clypealis

Agabus clypealis is a species of beetle in family Dytiscidae. It can be found in Denmark, Germany, Latvia, Poland, Russia, and Sweden.

Agabus congener

Agabus congener is a species of predatory beetle native to the Palearctic (including Europe) and the Near East. In Europe, it is only found in Andorra, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Great Britain including Shetland, Orkney, Hebrides and Isle of Man, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, mainland Denmark, Estonia, Finland, mainland France, Germany, mainland Greece, the Republic of Ireland, mainland Italy, Kaliningrad, Latvia, Lithuania, Northern Ireland, North Macedonia, mainland Norway, Poland, Russia, Sardinia, Slovakia, mainland Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Ukraine.

Agabus congener can be found in small acidic ponds or mesotrophic fens. This species was identified in samples of organic sediment recovered along with mammoth bones which were excavated in Niederweningen, Switzerland. The presence of this and many other insect species indicates that the sediments formed in a reedy, acidic swamp with shallow mossy pools.

Agabus discicollis

Agabus discicollis is a species of beetle in family Dytiscidae. It is endemic to Ethiopia.

Agabus fuscipennis

Agabus fuscipennis is a species of beetle native to the Palearctic (including Europe) and the Nearctic. In Europe, it is only found in Austria, Belarus, the Czech Republic, mainland Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, mainland Italy, Kaliningrad, Latvia, Lithuania, mainland Norway, Poland, Russia, Sardinia, Sicily, Slovakia, Sweden, and Ukraine.

Agabus hozgargantae

Agabus hozgargantae is a species of beetle in family Dytiscidae. It is endemic to Spain.

Agabus melanarius

Agabus melanarius is a species of beetle endemic to Europe, where it is only found in Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Great Britain, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, mainland Denmark, Estonia, Finland, mainland France, Germany, Hungary, mainland Italy, Kaliningrad, Lithuania, Luxembourg, mainland Norway, Poland, Russia except in the East, Sardinia, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Ukraine and Yugoslavia.

Agabus striolatus

Agabus striolatus is a species of beetle endemic to Europe, where it is only found in Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Great Britain including Shetland, Orkney, Hebrides and Isle of Man, Croatia, the Czech Republic, mainland Denmark, Estonia, Finland, mainland France, Germany, Hungary, mainland Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Russia except in the East, Slovakia, Sweden, the Netherlands and Ukraine.

Agabus sturmii

Agabus sturmii is a species of beetle native to the Palearctic (including Europe) and the Near East.

In Europe, it is only found in Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Great Britain including Shetland, Orkney, Hebrides and Isle of Man, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, mainland Denmark, Estonia, Finland, mainland France, Germany, Hungary, the Republic of Ireland, mainland Italy, Kaliningrad, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Northern Ireland, North Macedonia, mainland Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, mainland Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Ukraine.

Agabus uliginosus

Agabus uliginosus is a species of beetle native to the Palearctic, including Europe, where it is only found in Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Great Britain including Shetland, Orkney, Hebrides and Isle of Man, Croatia, the Czech Republic, mainland Denmark, Estonia, Finland, mainland France, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, mainland Italy, Kaliningrad, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, mainland Norway, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Ukraine and Yugoslavia.

Agabus undulatus

Agabus undulatus is a species of beetle native to the Palearctic, including Europe, where it is only found in Albania, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Great Britain including Shetland, Orkney, Hebrides and Isle of Man, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, mainland Denmark, Estonia, mainland France, Germany, Hungary, mainland Italy, Kaliningrad, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, mainland Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and Ukraine.

Brown diving beetle

The brown diving beetle (Agabus brunneus) is a species of water beetle in the Dytiscidae family.

Eero Endjärv

Eero Endjärv (born 24 January 1973) is an Estonian architect.

Endjärv was born in Tallinn. From 1988 to 1991 he studied in the 43rd Secondary School of Tallinn. From 1991 to 1995 he studied in the Tallinn Technical University. From 1995 he studied in the Estonian Academy of Arts in the department of architecture and city planning. He graduated from the academy in 2001.

Since 2001 Endjärv has worked in the architectural bureau Agabus, Endjärv & Truverk OÜ as an architect and partner. Since 2009 he has also been active in the Allianss Arhitektid OÜ architectural bureau.

The most notable works by Endjärv are the villa in Otepää in Southern Estonia, the new building of the University of Tallinn, the Viimsi School and the library of the Tallinn Technical University.

Endjärv is a member of the Union of Estonian Architects.

Habib the Carpenter

Habib the Carpenter, or Habib Al-Najjar, was, according to the belief of some Muslims, a Muslim martyr who lived in Antioch at the time of Jesus. In Muslim tradition, Habib believed the message of Christ's disciples sent to the People of Ya-Sin, and was subsequently martyred for his faith. The Mosque of Habib-i Neccar (Ottoman for Habib al-Najjar), below Mount Silpius, contains the tomb of Habib along with that of Sham'un Al-Safa (Simon the Pure). Some sources have identified Habib with Saint Agabus of the Acts of the Apostles, an early Christian who suffered martyrdom in Antioch at the time of Jesus. This connection is disputed, as Christian tradition holds that Agabus was martyred at Jerusalem, and not at Antioch as Muslims believe of Habib. All Muslim sources list Habib's occupation as a carpenter.

Leith Hill SSSI

Leith Hill SSSI is a 337.9-hectare (835-acre) biological Site of Special Scientific Interest south-east of Dorking in Surrey. The SSSI consists of four wooded areas surrounding Leith Hill.These woods support diverse breeding birds, including all three species of British woodpeckers. The invertebrate population is outstanding, with many nationally rare and uncommon species, such as the beetles Notolaemus unifasciatus, which is found on dead wood, Silvanus bidentatus, which feeds on fungus, and the water beetle Agabus melanarius. There are two nationally rare moths.

Mattias Agabus

Mattias Agabus (born 14 September 1977) is an Estonian architect. He studied in the Estonian Academy of Arts in the department of architecture and city planning, graduating from the academy in 2001. Mattias Agabus is a member of the Union of Estonian Architects.

From 2000 to 2001 he worked in the Arhitektuuriagentuur OÜ architectural bureau. From 2001 to 2009, he worked as a partner in the architectural office Agabus, Endjärv & Truverk OÜ, Since 2009, he has worked for Allianss Architects OÜ.

He is noted for the design of the Viimsi school, new building of the Tallinn University, villa in Otepää in Southern Estonia and the new library of the Tallinn Technical University.

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