Afton Down

Afton Down is a chalk down near the village of Freshwater on the Isle of Wight.[1] Afton Down faces Compton Bay directly to the west, while Freshwater is approximately one mile north.

It was the site of the Isle of Wight Festival 1970, where the Guinness Book of Records estimates 600,000 to 700,000, and possibly 800,000 people, flocked to see the musical talents of Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Free, The Who, The Doors, Ten Years After and Jimi Hendrix.[2]

In keeping with the native flora of Compton Bay, a variety of hardy plants grow on the down. Large European gorse bushes grow on the cliff, with the shelter they provide allowing other plants such as wild cabbage and bird's foot trefoil to thrive. Due to the strong prevailing wind from the English channel to the west, no large trees are able to grow on the down, allowing shrubs and grasses to thrive. The Isle of Wight's county flower, the pyramidal orchid, also grows here, along with Plantago lanceolata, the main food plant for the rare Glanville fritillary.

A car park is situated near the highest point of the Military Road's route over the down, and allows for walkers to travel along a footpath downhill towards Freshwater Bay.

There is an obelisk on Afton Down near the cliff edge. It is inscribed with a memorial to 15 year-old Edward Lewis Miller of Goudhurst in Kent who died after falling from the cliff in 1846. This obelisk was Grade II listed in 1994.

E.L.M. Aged 15
He cometh forth like a flower and is cut down.
He fleeth also as a shadow and continueth not.
Erected in remembrance of a most dear and only child who was suddenly removed into eternity by a fall from the adjacent cliff on the rocks below.
28th August 1846.

Each side of the obelisk is inscribed with biblical passages in relation to the afterlife.

Afton down
View of Afton Down looking towards Freshwater Bay

In the 17th century it was common for local people to descend the cliffs to collect seabirds and pick samphire. The birds were killed and plucked and their feathers sold, and the carcasses were sold to local fisherman to bait crab pots. The samphire was pickled and sent to London in barrels.[3]

Freshwater Bay Golf Course is located on Afton Down.[4]

On the downs are a group of 24 barrows comprising, a long barrow 34.7 m long, 0.9 m high and oriented east-west, 17 bowl barrows, 4 bell barrows and 2 disc barrows (One of which is where the golf course is located). One barrow has been the subject of archaeological interest, and is thought to be from the Bronze Age.[5][6] The site was excavated in 1817 revealing nothing of significance in the long barrow, but several cremations in the round barrows.[1]

Afton Down
Afton Down
Afton Down viewed from Tennyson Down.
Geography
LocationIsle of Wight, England
Topo mapOS Landranger 196

References

  1. ^ a b "Roman Britain - Afton Down". www.roman-britain.org. Archived from the original on 20 November 2008. Retrieved 12 April 2009.
  2. ^ "Isle of Wight Festival History - 1970". www.isleofwightfestival.com. Archived from the original on 11 March 2009. Retrieved 11 April 2009.
  3. ^ "Freshwater in the 17th Century". www.virgin.net. Archived from the original on 26 August 2009. Retrieved 12 April 2009.
  4. ^ "Isle of Wight golf at Freshwater Bay Golf Club". www.freshwaterbaygolfclub.co.uk. Archived from the original on 21 March 2009. Retrieved 4 April 2009.
  5. ^ "Oxford Archaeology: Exploring the Human Journey". www.thehumanjourney.net. Archived from the original on 5 July 2007. Retrieved 11 July 2007.
  6. ^ "Neolithic to Early Bronze Age Resource Assessment: The Isle of Wight" (PDF). www.thehumanjourney.net. Retrieved 11 July 2007.

Coordinates: 50°40′08″N 1°30′18″W / 50.669°N 1.505°W

Afton, Isle of Wight

Afton is a hamlet just outside Freshwater on the west side of the Isle of Wight. It features a local hill known as Afton Down which was the site of the Isle of Wight Festival in 1970, one of the largest rock concerts to be held in the UK. Freshwater Bay Golf Course is located on Afton Down. Afton lends its name to a number of local properties, including Afton Lodge, Afton Manor and Afton Thatch, the latter two dating from the 17th Century.A barrow located on Afton Down has been the subject of archaeological interest, and is thought to be from the Bronze Age.A yearly Apple Day Festival takes place every fall at a commercial nursery known as Afton Park. The Apple Festival draws several thousand people a year to enjoy entertainment, a children's "apple olympics", and demonstrations.Transport is provided by Southern Vectis route 7, which runs close by.

Compton Bay

Compton Bay is a bay located on the southwest section of the Isle of Wight, England. Its north western edge is defined by the distinctive white chalk cliff of Freshwater Cliff, named after adjacent Freshwater Bay, which forms a small cove with the village of Freshwater situated just behind. Its north eastern edge is formed from the soft red and orange cretaceous rocks of Brook Bay, which are rapidly eroding.

Due to the lack of grazing on the cliffs above the bay, the native chalk ecosystem has thrived. Atop the cliffs, the Island's county flower, the pyramidal orchid, can be found, while the rare Glanville fritillary butterfly also lives in large numbers supported by the native flowers. There are also other hardy plants, such as common gorse bushes and wild cabbage.

The bay is popular with wave and kite surfers due to the waves that form when the prevailing south-westerly wind is blowing onshore. The beach is gently shelving and consists mostly of sand, with a few lengths of submerged rock, although at high tide the sea covers the beach almost completely. The car park and its public facilities are owned by the National Trust, as is the coastal strip of land. The Isle of Wight Coastal Path runs along the cliff around the bay.

There are dinosaur footprints visible in Compton Bay when the tide is low, and this is one of the best areas to see the dinosaurs of the Isle of Wight. Fossil hunters can often be seen searching for smaller fossils on the beach.

Dimbola Lodge

Dimbola Lodge was the Isle of Wight home of the Victorian pioneer photographer Julia Margaret Cameron from 1860 to 1875. It is now owned by the Julia Margaret Cameron Trust, which runs the Dimbola Museum and Galleries.

Downland

A downland is an area of open chalk hills. This term is especially used to describe the chalk countryside in southern England. Areas of downland are often referred to as downs, deriving from a Celtic word for "hills".

Freshwater, Isle of Wight

Freshwater is a large village and civil parish at the western end of the Isle of Wight, England. Freshwater Bay is a small cove on the south coast of the Island which also gives its name to the nearby part of Freshwater.

Freshwater sits at the western end of the region known as the Back of the Wight or the West Wight which is a popular tourist area.Freshwater is close to steep chalk cliffs. It was the birthplace of physicist Robert Hooke and was the home of Poet Laureate Alfred Lord Tennyson.

Golden Hill Fort

Golden Hill Fort was a defensible barracks at Freshwater, Isle of Wight, England, built as part of the Palmerston defences by the 1859 Royal Commission on the Defence of the United Kingdom to provide manpower to man the defences at the western end of the Isle of Wight, England. Built in hexagonal form, it accommodated 8 officers and 128 men, and had its own hospital. The garrison for the nearby Hatherwood Battery was held at the fort. In 1914 33 Company Royal Garrison Artillery was based at the Fort.The Fort is a local landmark which is in a very prominent position overlooking much of the land looking south towards Afton Down. Whilst operational, the area was kept clear of vegetation to allow views out to the Solent. The name Golden Hill refers not to the spectacular golden display of gorse but to an historic landowner named Gauden.

The building, which is a Grade 1 Listed Building, is now in private ownership and not open to the public. It was derelict and had not been used for many years, passing through numerous owners. Planning consent was granted in 2003 for conversion to residential use, with the listed building consent updated in 2007. Golden Hill Fort was converted into 18 dwellings by Golden Hill Homes between 2008 and 2011.

Hampshire Constabulary

Hampshire Constabulary is the territorial police force responsible for policing the counties of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight in South East England.The force area includes Southampton, the largest city in South East England, and the naval city of Portsmouth. It also covers the New Forest National Park, sections of the South Downs National Park, large towns such as Basingstoke, Eastleigh, Andover, Fareham and Aldershot, and the historic city of Winchester. The constabulary, as it is currently constituted, dates from 1967, but modern policing in Hampshire can be traced back to 1832.

In late 2015, the force moved its strategic headquarters to Eastleigh, into a building shared with Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service. At the same time, the force moved its Operational Headquarters to Mottisfont Court in Winchester. The Support & Training Headquarters and control room are located in Netley, near Southampton, in buildings of the former Netley Hospital.

History of the Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight is rich in historical and archaeological sites, from prehistoric fossil beds with dinosaur remains, to dwellings and artefacts dating back to the Bronze Age, Iron Age, and Roman periods.

Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight (; also referred to informally as The Island or abbreviated to IoW) is a county and the largest and second-most populous island in England. It is in the English Channel, between 2 and 5 miles off the coast of Hampshire, separated by the Solent. The island has resorts that have been holiday destinations since Victorian times, and is known for its mild climate, coastal scenery, and verdant landscape of fields, downland and chines. The island is designated a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve.

The island has been home to the poets Swinburne and Tennyson and to Queen Victoria, who built her much-loved summer residence and final home Osborne House at East Cowes. It has a maritime and industrial tradition including boat-building, sail-making, the manufacture of flying boats, the hovercraft, and Britain's space rockets. The island hosts annual music festivals including the Isle of Wight Festival, which in 1970 was the largest rock music event ever held. It has well-conserved wildlife and some of the richest cliffs and quarries for dinosaur fossils in Europe.

The isle was owned by a Norman family until 1293 and was earlier a kingdom in its own right. In common with the Crown dependencies, the British Crown was then represented on the island by the Governor of the Isle of Wight until 1995. The island has played an important part in the defence of the ports of Southampton and Portsmouth, and been near the front-line of conflicts through the ages, including the Spanish Armada and the Battle of Britain. Rural for most of its history, its Victorian fashionability and the growing affordability of holidays led to significant urban development during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Historically part of Hampshire, the island became a separate administrative county in 1890. It continued to share the Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire until 1974, when it was made its own ceremonial county. Apart from a shared police force, there is now no administrative link with Hampshire, although a combined local authority with Portsmouth and Southampton was considered, this is now unlikely to proceed.The quickest public transport link to the mainland is the hovercraft from Ryde to Southsea; three vehicle ferry and two catamaran services cross the Solent to Southampton, Lymington and Portsmouth.

Isle of Wight Festival

The Isle of Wight Festival is a British music festival which takes place annually in Newport on the Isle of Wight, England. It was originally a counterculture event held from 1968 to 1970.The 1970 event was by far the largest of these early festivals and the unexpectedly high attendance levels led, in 1971, to Parliament adding a section to the Isle of Wight County Council Act 1971 preventing overnight open-air gatherings of more than 5,000 people on the island without a special licence from the council.

The event was revived in 2002.

Isle of Wight Festival 1970

The Isle of Wight Festival 1970 was held between 26 and 31 August 1970 at Afton Down, an area on the western side of the Isle of Wight. It was the last of three consecutive music festivals to take place on the island between 1968 and 1970 and widely acknowledged as the largest musical event of its time, greater than the attendance of Woodstock. Although estimates vary, the Guinness World Records estimated 600,000, possibly 700,000 people attended. It was organised and promoted by local brothers, Ron and Ray Foulk through their company Fiery Creations Ltd and their brother Bill Foulk. Ron Smith was site manager and Rikki Farr acted as compere.

The preceding Isle of Wight Festivals, also promoted by the Foulks, had already gained a good reputation in 1968 and 1969 by featuring acts such as Jefferson Airplane, T. Rex, The Move, The Pretty Things, Joe Cocker, The Moody Blues (performed at the 1969 festival), The Who, and Bob Dylan in his first performance since his 1966 motorcycle accident.

Many excerpts from this festival have appeared on record and video.

Isle of Wight Festival 2006

The Isle of Wight Festival 2006 was the fifth revived Isle of Wight Festival on the Seaclose Park site in Newport on the Isle of Wight. It took place between 9 and 11 June 2006. The attendance was around 55,000 and the event was dubbed the biggest festival in England, because Glastonbury was on its break year. It was the last of three consecutive years of Nokia sponsorship, which saw the likes of The Who, David Bowie and R.E.M. grace the Island stage.

New additions to the festival site included the Bandstand, which allowed local bands to perform, the Carling warm beer amnesty and the Strawberry fields a large area of bars and music venues. The festival achieved island-wide promotion by displaying the 2006 logo on Isle of Wight service buses. These buses were used to shuttle festival goers to a commemorative statue of Jimi Hendrix at Dimbola Lodge in Freshwater Bay near Afton Down (where the 1970 festival was staged).

The festival was filmed and highlights were shown on late night broadcasts on Channel 4. Notable moments included Coldplay covering Lou Reed's 1972 song 'Perfect Day' during their Sunday night headline performance after the ex-Velvet Underground frontman failed to play it in his 'unpredictable' set earlier in the day. Coldplay singer Chris Martin told media that Lou Reed had asked them to do the cover to 'placate the crowd'. The Sunday also saw Procol Harum return to the festival for the first time since they played at the original version of the festival in 1970.

List of National Trust land in England

This is a list of National Trust land in England. This is land that is looked after by the National Trust and includes coast, countryside and heritage landscapes. This does not include NT properties, unless they contain significant estate land.

The list is subdivided using the National Trust's own system which divides England into nine regions. These are not the same as the official Regions of England.

The counties of England are divided up as follows:

Devon & Cornwall

East of England

Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, part of Hertfordshire, Norfolk, Suffolk

East Midlands

Derbyshire, Leicestershire, S Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Rutland

North West

Cheshire, Cumbria, Greater Manchester, Lancashire, Merseyside

South East

East Sussex, Kent, Surrey, West Sussex

Thames & Solent

Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Greater London, Oxfordshire

West Midlands

Birmingham, Herefordshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire, Worcestershire

Wessex

Bristol / Bath, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Somerset, Wiltshire

Yorkshire & North East

County Durham, N Lincolnshire, Newcastle & Tyneside, Northumberland, Teesside, Yorkshire

List of downs

Down is used in the name of geographical features or locations that are downland or close to downland, including:

Abbotts Ann Down, hamlet in Hampshire, England

Afton Down, chalk down near the village of Freshwater on the Isle of Wight

Andover Down, hamlet in Hampshire, England

Arreton Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest on the Isle of Wight

Ashley Down, area in the north of Bristol

Aston Down, east of Minchinhampton, Gloucestershire, England

Asylum Down, neighborhood in Accra, Ghana

Ballard Down, area of chalk downland on the Purbeck Hills in Dorset, England

Batcombe Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Dorset, England

Bathampton Down, overlooking Bath, Somerset, England

Beaminster Down, one of the highest hills in West Dorset, England

Bembridge Down, Site of special scientific interest north-east of Sandown, Isle of Wight

Bin Down, hill, 203 metres (666 ft) high near Liskeard in the county of Cornwall, England

Black Down, Dorset, hill on the South Dorset Ridgeway in Dorset, England

Black Down, Somerset, the highest hill in the Mendip Hills, Somerset, England

Black Down, Sussex, the highest hill in the county of Sussex, England

Black Hill Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Dorset, England

Blow's Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Dunstable, Bedfordshire, England

Bolberry Down, clifftop area on the coast of Devon, England

MoD Boscombe Down, aircraft testing site in Amesbury, Wiltshire, England

Botley Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Bourton Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Gloucestershire, England

Brading Down, chalk down southwest of Brading, Isle of Wight

Brean Down, promontory off the coast of Somerset, England

Brickworth Down and Dean Hill, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Brighstone Down, chalk down on the Isle of Wight

Broadhalfpenny Down, historic cricket ground in Hambledon, Hampshire

Burcombe Down, area of chalk grassland south of Burcombe in Wiltshire, England

Burham Down, woodland reserve in Kent

Calbourne Down in Calbourne, a village and civil parish on the Isle of Wight

Camp Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Camp Down, Portsdown Hill, Admiralty semaphore station, near Portsmouth, England

Castle Down, windswept plateau of maritime heath in the island of Tresco, Isles of Scilly

Catherington Down, Hampshire, England

Chaldon Down, one of the highest hills on South Dorset's Jurassic Coast in England

Charlton Down, village in Dorset, England

Charnage Down Chalk Pit, geological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Chavey Down, hamlet in Berkshire, England

Cherhill Down, village and civil parish in Wiltshire, England

Chilbolton Down, hamlet in the civil parish of Chilbolton, Hampshire, England

Claverton Down, suburb on the south-east hilltop edge of Bath, Somerset, England

Clearbury Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Clifton Down, public open space in Bristol, England, north of the village of Clifton

Cockey Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Combe Down, village suburb of Bath, Somerset, England

Combe Down and Bathampton Down Mines, Site of Special Scientific Interest in Bath, Somerset, England

Compton Down, hill on the Isle of Wight just to the east of Freshwater Bay

Copehill Down, UK Ministry of Defence training facility on Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire, England

County Down, county in Northern Ireland

Crawley Down, village in the Mid Sussex district of West Sussex, England

Culver Down, chalk down to the north of Sandown, Isle of Wight

Danks Down and Truckle Hill, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Dorset Down, breed of sheep native to the Dorset Downs region of England

Duncan Down, open, public, area to the south west of Whitstable, England

Dundry Down, village south of Bristol, England

Durdham Down, area of public open space in Bristol, England

East Down, Devon, village and civil parish in the Barnstaple district of Devon, England

Ebsbury Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Emery Down, small village in the New Forest National Park in Hampshire, England

Epsom Down, used as a cricket venue between 1816 and 1819, near Epsom, England

Farthing Down, open space in Coulsdon in the London Borough of Croydon, England

Finkley Down, suburb and hamlet in the civil parish of Finkley in Hampshire, England

Five Ash Down, small village within the civil parish of Maresfield, East Sussex, England

Fyfield Down, part of the Marlborough Downs, north of the village of Fyfield, Wiltshire, England

Galley Down Wood, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Hampshire, England

Garston's Down, Site of special scientific interest which is south of Carisbrooke, Isle of Wight

Gurston Down Motorsport Hillclimb, in Broad Chalke, Wiltshire, England

Hadlow Down, village and civil parish in the Wealden District of East Sussex, England

Head Down, Hampshire, one of the highest points in the county of Hampshire, England

Headley Down, village within the civil parish of Headley, Hampshire, England

Henwood Down, one of the highest points in the county of Hampshire, England

High Down (Isle of Wight), area of downland on Isle of Wight, England

Hingston Down, hill not far from Gunnislake in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom

Holybourne Down, high point near Alton, Hampshire, England

Houghton Down, hamlet in the Test Valley district of Hampshire, England

Itchin Stoke Down, rural location near the town of Alresford in Hampshire, England

Kentisbury Down, location of an Iron Age enclosurenear Blackmore Gate, Exmoor, Devon, England

Kimpton Down, village and civil parish in the Test Valley district of Hampshire, England

Lady Down Quarry, geological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Lardon Chase, the Holies and Lough Down, adjacent National Trust properties in Berkshire, England

Maes Down, geological Site of Special Scientific Interest between Shepton Mallet and Stoney Stratton in Somerset, England

Melbury Down, area of downland in northern Dorset, England

Milber Down, Iron Age hill fort on the hill above the suburb of Milber, Newton Abbot, Devon, England

Mockham Down, the site of an Iron Age Hill Fort close to Brayfordhill in Devon, England

Mottistone Down, Site of Special Scientific Interest north of Mottistone, Isle of Wight

Nine Barrow Down, elongated hill, the northern ridge of the Purbeck Hills in Dorset, England

Normanton Down Barrows, Neolithic and Bronze Age barrow cemetery south of Stonehenge in Wiltshire, England

Northington Down, hamlet in the civil parish of Northington, Hampshire, England

Odd Down, area of the city of Bath, Somerset, England

Odstock Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Old Castle Down, Site of Special Scientific Interest in the Vale of Glamorgan, South Wales

Old Down, hamlet near Olveston and Tockington in South Gloucestershire, England

Otterham Down, village and a civil parish in north Cornwall, England

Overton Down, a long-term project in experimental archaeology in Wiltshire, England

Park Gate Down, stretch of chalk downland near Elham in East Kent, England

Parsonage Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Payne's Down, prominent hill near Axminster, Dorset, England

Perham Down, village in Wiltshire, England, near Ludgershall and Tidworth

Perriam Down near Ludgershall, Wiltshire, England was used as a cricket venue between 1787 and 1796

Pincombe Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Pitcombe Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Dorset, England

Porth Hellick Down, area of downland on the island of St Mary's in the Isles of Scilly

Porton Down, United Kingdom government military science park

Prescombe Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Rampisham Down, chalk hill in the Dorset Downs, near Dorchester, Dorset, England

Rew Down, Site of Special Scientific Interest and Local Nature Reserve, Isle of Wight

Roundway Down and Covert, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Seaton Down, the location of an Iron Age hill fort near Seaton, Devon, England

Shovel Down, area of Dartmoor in Devon, England that is covered in megaliths

Southern Down or Southerndown, village in South Wales to the southwest of Bridgend

St. Catherine's Down, chalk down on the Isle of Wight, near the southernmost point on the island

St Boniface Down, chalk down on the Isle of Wight, England

Starveall and Stony Down, Site of Special Scientific Interest in Codford and Wylye, Wiltshire, England

Steeple Langford Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest at Steeple Langford in Wiltshire, England

Stenbury Down, chalk down on the Isle of Wight

Stockton Wood and Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Stonebeck Down, civil parish in Harrogate district, North Yorkshire, England

Stonehill Down Nature Reserve, downland nature reserve on the Purbeck Hills, Dorset, England

Stoney Down, hill and forested countryside in Dorset, England

Stormy Down, Site of Special Scientific Interest near Pyle in Bridgend County Borough, south Wales

Stratford Toney Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Tennyson Down, hill at the west end of the Isle of Wight just south of Totland

Throope Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Thruxton Down, west of Andover, Hampshire, England

Toller Down, one of the highest hills in the county of Dorset, England

Trendlebere Down, woodland managed by Natural England in Dartmoor, Devon, England

Twyford Down, area of chalk downland southeast of Winchester, Hampshire, England

Tytherington Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Upton Cow Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

War Down, one of the highest hills in the county of Hampshire, England

Waterpit Down in Forrabury and Minster, a civil parish in Cornwall, England

Watership Down, Hampshire, hill in Ecchinswell, Sydmonton and Bishops Green in Hampshire, England

Wavering Down, geological and biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in the Mendip Hills, Somerset, England

West Down, civil parish and village located in North Devon, England, between Braunton and Ilfracombe

Headon Warren and West High Down SSSI, Site of special scientific interest, Isle of Wight

West Yatton Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Westover Down, chalk down on the Isle of Wight

Wether Down, one of the highest hills in the county of Hampshire, England

Whiddon Down, hamlet within the parish of Drewsteignton in Devon

Whitehill Down, Site of Special Scientific Interest in Carmarthen & Dinefwr, Wales

Willingdon Down, Site of Special Scientific Interest in Eastbourne, East Sussex, England

Win Green Down, biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Wiltshire, England

Windmill Down, rural location near the town of Hambledon in Hampshire, England

Wingletang Down (St Agnes), Site of Special Scientific Interest on the island of St Agnes in the Isles of Scilly, England

Winterbourne Down, Gloucestershire, village in South Gloucestershire, England

Worthy Down Barracks, British Army barracks near Winchester, Hampshire, England

Yellowmead Down, location of Yellowmead stone circle near Sheepstor in Devon, England

Melanie (singer)

Melanie Anne Safka-Schekeryk (born February 3, 1947) is an American singer-songwriter known professionally as Melanie and sometimes as Melanie Safka. She remains best known for the 1971/72 global hit "Brand New Key", her cover of "Ruby Tuesday", her composition "What Have They Done to My Song Ma", and her 1970 international breakthrough hit "Lay Down (Candles in the Rain)", inspired by her experience of performing at the 1969 Woodstock music festival.

Palmerston Forts, Isle of Wight

The Palmerston Forts are a group of forts and associated structures built during the Victorian period on the recommendations of the 1860 Royal Commission on the Defence of the United Kingdom. The name comes from their association with Lord Palmerston, who was Prime Minister at the time and promoted the idea.

The structures were built as a response to a perceived threat of a French invasion. The works were also known as Palmerston's Follies as, by the time they were completed the threat (if it had ever existed) had passed, largely due to the Franco-Prussian war of 1870 and technological advancements leading to the guns becoming out-of-date.As well as new structures, extensive modifications were made to existing defences.

The defences on the Isle of Wight were built to protect the approaches to the Solent, Southampton and Portsmouth. They consist of three separate groups, those at the western end of the island, those at the eastern end, and four built in the Solent.

The information in the tables is taken from documents for each site, from the Victorian Forts website.

St. Mary's Church, Goudhurst

The Church of St. Mary the Virgin is the 13th-century Anglican parish church for the village of Goudhurst in Kent. The church has been a Grade I listed building since 1967 and comes under the Diocese of Canterbury.

The church stands on a hill and its tower commands impressive views of the surrounding countryside.

For this reason it was a major surveying point in the Anglo-French Survey (1784–1790) to measure the precise distance and relationship between the Paris Observatory and the Royal Greenwich Observatory, supervised by General William Roy.

Tennyson Trail

The Tennyson Trail is a 14-mile walk from Carisbrooke to The Needles on the Isle of Wight. The route goes through Bowcombe Down, Brighstone Forest, Mottistone Down, Brook Down, Afton Down, Freshwater Bay, Tennyson Down, and West High Down to Alum Bay. The name of the trail comes from poet Alfred Lord Tennyson, a former resident of the Isle of Wight.

There are several points of interest along the walk, including The Tennyson Monument on Tennyson Down, Farringford House and The Needles Batteries which overlook The Needles.Much of the trail, being a public byway, was formerly open to all traffic, including motor vehicles. By the early 2000s, off-road vehicles had become an increasing problem, and were damaging tracks, archaeological sites and wildlife habitats. In response, in 2006, the Isle of Wight council banned all motor vehicles from the entire length of the trail.

The Hamsters

The Hamsters were a British band from Southend-on-Sea, Essex, England.

They performed their first live show at the Cliffs Pavilion, Southend-on-Sea, on 1 April 1987, and their last at The Half Moon, Putney on 1 April 2012, exactly 25 years later. They initially played in local pubs with no ambitions to take themselves seriously or to turn professional. As the band ethos is to combine humour with music two members of the original band (now all three) use light-hearted and parodying pseudonyms as stage names. The original line-up was Snail's-Pace Slim on vocals and guitar, Rev Otis Elevator on drums and Andy Farrell on bass. Andy Billups, aka Ms Zsa Zsa Poltergeist, replaced Farrell on bass in 1988.

The band's name was based on a pseudonym used by the Sex Pistols.

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