Aegean Region

The Aegean Region (Turkish: Ege Bölgesi) is one of the 7 geographical regions of Turkey.

Located in western Turkey, it is bordered by the Aegean Sea to the west, the Marmara Region to the north, the Central Anatolia Region to the east, and the Mediterranean Region to the south.

Among the four coastal regions, the Aegean Region has the longest coastline.

Aegean Region

Ege Bölgesi
Region of Turkey
Location of Aegean Region
CountryTurkey
Area
 • Total93,139 km2 (35,961 sq mi)

Subdivision

  • Aegean Section (Turkish: Ege Bölümü)
    • Edremit Area (Turkish: Edremit Yöresi)
    • Bakırçay Area (Turkish: Bakırçay Yöresi)
    • Gediz Area (Turkish: Gediz Yöresi)
    • İzmir Area (Turkish: İzmir Yöresi)
    • Küçük Menderes Area (Turkish: Küçük Menderes Yöresi)
    • Büyük Menderes Area (Turkish: Büyük Menderes Yöresi)
    • Menteşe Area (Turkish: Menteşe Yöresi)
  • Inner Western Anatolia Section (Turkish: İç Batı Anadolu Bölümü)

Ecoregions

The ecoregions of this region are all Terrestrial, more specifically Palearctic, and still more so, Mediterranean forests, woodlands, and scrub. Different parts are within the following classifications:

Provinces

Provinces that are entirely in the Aegean Region:

Provinces that are mostly in the Aegean Region:

Provinces that are partially in the Aegean Region:

Climate

Aydın
Climate chart (explanation)
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Average max. and min. temperatures in °C
Precipitation totals in mm
Source: Turkish State Meteorology [1]

The climate of the Aegean Region has a Mediterranean climate at the coast, with hot, dry summers and mild to cool, wet winters and a semi-arid continental climate in the interior with hot, dry summers and cold, snowy winters.

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-06-20. Retrieved 2011-05-30.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

See also

Coordinates: 38°00′N 29°00′E / 38.000°N 29.000°E

Aegean Region (statistical)

The Aegean Region (Turkish: Ege Bölgesi) (TR3) is a statistical region in Turkey.

Alabanda

Alabanda (Ancient Greek: Ἀλάβανδα) or Antiochia of the Chrysaorians was a city of ancient Caria, Anatolia, the site of which is near Doğanyurt, Çine, Aydın Province, Turkey.

The city is located in the saddle between two heights. The area is noted for its dark marble and for gemstones that resembled garnets. Stephanus of Byzantium claims that there were two cities named Alabanda (Alabandeus) in Caria, but no other ancient source corroborates this.

Amos (ancient city)

Amos (Ancient Greek: Ἄμος, possibly from ἄμμος "sandy") was a settlement (dēmē) of ancient Caria, located near the modern town of Turunç, Turkey.

Amyzon

Amyzon (Ancient Greek: Ἁμυζών) in Caria (now Mazin, Aydın Province between the villages of Akmescit and Gaffarlar, in Aegean Turkey) was an ancient city 30 km south of modern Koçarlı.

Antioch on the Maeander

Antioch on the Maeander or Antiochia on the Maeander (Greek: Ἀντιόχεια τοῦ Μαιάνδρου; Latin: Antiochia ad Maeandrum), earlier Pythopolis, was a city of ancient Caria, in Anatolia. The city was situated between the Maeander and Orsinus rivers near their confluence. Though it was the site of a bridge over the Maeander, it had "little or no individual history". The scanty ruins are located on a hill (named, in Turkish, Yenişer) a few km southeast of Kuyucak, Aydın Province, Turkey, near the modern city of Başaran, or the village of Aliağaçiftliği. The city already existed when Antiochus I enlarged and renamed it. It was home to the sophist Diotrephes.It has not been excavated, although Christopher Ratte and others visited the site in 1994 and produced a sketch plan.

Apollonia Salbaces

Apollonia Salbaces or Apollonia Salbakes (Ancient Greek: Ἀπολλωνία Σαλβάκη) was a town in ancient Anatolia.

The site of Apollonia Salbaces is near the modern Medet.

Beycesultan

Beycesultan (pronounced [ˈbejdʒe sulˈtan]) is an archaeological site in western Anatolia, located about 5 km southwest of the modern-day city of Çivril in the Denizli Province of Turkey. It lies in a bend of an old tributary of Büyük Menderes River (Maeander River).

Blaundus

Blaundus was a Roman episcopal city in Asia Minor, presently Anatolia (Asian Turkey), and is now a Latin Catholic titular bishopric.

Ceramus

Ceramus or Keramos (Ancient Greek: Κέραμος) was a city on the north coast of the Ceramic Gulf—named after this city—in ancient Caria, in southwest Asia Minor; its ruins can be found outside the modern village of Ören, Muğla Province, Turkey.Ceramus, initially subjected to Stratonicea, afterwards autonomous, was a member of the Athenian League and was one of the chief cities of the Chrysaorian League (Bulletin de corresp. hellén., IX, 468). In ancient times, it probably had a temple of Zeus Chrysaoreus. In Roman times, it coined its own money.

Euromus

Euromus or Euromos (Ancient Greek: Εὔρωμος) – also, Europus or Europos (Εὐρωπός), Eunomus or Eunomos (Εὔνωμος), Philippi or Philippoi (Φίλιπποι); earlier Kyromus and Hyromus – was an ancient city in Caria, Anatolia; the ruins are approximately 4 km southeast of Selimiye and 12 km northwest of Milas (the ancient Mylasa), Muğla Province, Turkey. It was situated at the foot of Mount Grium, which runs parallel to Mount Latmus, and was built by one Euromus, a son of Idris, a Carian.Probably dating from the 6th century BC, [1] Euromus was a member of the Chrysaorian League during Seleucid times. Euromus also minted its own coins from the 2nd century BCE to the 2nd century CE. Under the Roman dominion Euromus belonged to the conventus of Alabanda.The ruins contain numerous interesting buildings, the most outstanding of which is the temple of Zeus Lepsinos from the reign of Emperor Hadrian. [2] Archaeologists have found terra cotta shards indicating that the temple site had its origins back at least to the 6th century BC. The temple is one of the best preserved classical temples in Turkey: sixteen columns remain standing and most of the columns are inscribed in honour of the citizen who commissioned their construction. Carian rock-cut tombs are also found at Euromus.

Gambrium

Gambrium or Gambrion (Ancient Greek: Γάμβριον), also Gambreium or Gambreion (Γάμβρειον), was a town of ancient Aeolis and of Mysia, quite close to Pergamum. Its location is near Kınık and Bergama in İzmir province, in the Aegean Region of Turkey.

It is on a hill named Hisarlık in the Bakırçay (ancient Kaikos) valley and very close to modern town of Poyracık.Gambrium is first mentioned in the Hellenica of Xenophon which gives knowledge about the region in 399 BCE. At that time the ruler of the city, as well as of Palaegambrium, was Gorgion, son of Gongylos.There was a star with twelve rays on the electrum coins of Gambrium.

Kütahya Province

Kütahya Province (Turkish: Kütahya ili) is a province in the Aegean region of Turkey. It is 11,875 km2 in size, and the population is 571,554 (2014). In 1990, Kütahya had a population of 578,000.

The neighboring provinces are Bursa to the northwest, Bilecik to the northeast, Eskişehir to the east, Afyon to the southeast, Usak to the south, Manisa to the southwest and Balıkesir to the west.

Oenoanda

Oenoanda or Oinoanda (Greek: τὰ Οἰνόανδα) was an ancient Greek city in Lycia, in the upper valley of the River Xanthus. It is noted for the philosophical inscription by the Epicurean, Diogenes of Oenoanda. The ruins of the city lie west of the modern village İncealiler in the Fethiye district of Muğla Province, Turkey, which partly overlies the ancient site.

Pepuza

Pepuza (also spelled Pepouza) was an ancient town in Phrygia, Asia Minor (in today's Turkish district of Karahallı, Uşak Province, Aegean Region). Coordinates of the central terrasse of the settlement: UTM 35 S 0714926/4253954 (WGS-84), 38.408˚ N, 29.4615˚ E.

From the middle of the 2nd century CE to the middle of the 6th century, Pepuza was the headquarters of the ancient Christian church of Montanism, which spread all over the Roman Empire. The Montanist patriarch resided at Pepouza, and the Montanists expected the heavenly Jerusalem to descend to earth at Pepouza and the nearby town of Tymion. In late antiquity, both places attracted crowds of pilgrims from all over the Roman Empire. Women played an emancipated role in Montanism, becoming priests and also bishops. In the 6th century, this church became extinct.

Since 2001, Peter Lampe of the University of Heidelberg has directed annual archaeological campaigns in Phrygia, Turkey. During these interdisciplinary campaigns, together with William Tabbernee of Tulsa, numerous unknown ancient settlements were discovered and archaeologically documented. Two of them are the best candidates so far in the search for the identification of the two holy centers of ancient Montanism, Pepuza and Tymion. Scholars had searched for these lost sites since the 19th century.

The ancient settlement in the Karahallı area, near the village of Karayakuplu, discovered and identified as Pepuza by William Tabbernee and Peter Lampe, was settled continuously from Hellenistic times to Byzantine times. In Byzantine times, an important rock-cut monastery belonged to the town.

Serrion Teichos

Serrion Teichos (Ancient Greek: Σέρριον τείχος) or Serreion Teichos (Σέρρειον τεῖχος) was a Greek city in ancient Thrace, located in the region of the Propontis. It was a member of the Delian League and appears in tribute lists of Athens between 428/7 and 418/7 BCE. It later bore the name of Ganus or Ganos (Γάνος or Γᾶνος). It is under this name that the town is mentioned by geographers and historians, as a noted mountain fortress of Thrace.Its site is near the modern Ganos, Turkey.

South Aegean

The South Aegean (Greek: Περιφέρεια Νοτίου Αιγαίου) is one of the thirteen administrative regions of Greece. It consists of the Cyclades and Dodecanese island groups in the central and southeastern Aegean Sea.

Stratonicea (Lydia)

Stratonicea – (Greek: Στρατoνικεια, or Στρατονίκεια) also transliterated as Stratoniceia and Stratonikeia, earlier Indi, and later for a time Hadrianapolis – was an ancient city in the valley of the Caicus river, between Germe and Acrasus, in Lydia, Anatolia; its site is currently near the village of Siledik, in the district of Kırkağaç, Manisa Province, in the Aegean Region of Turkey.

Tymion

Tymion was an ancient town in Phrygia, Asia Minor (in today's Turkish district of Karahallı, Uşak Province, Aegean Region). Its site is located at the Turkish village of Şükranje.

From the middle of the 2nd century CE to the middle of the 6th century CE, Tymion was an important town for the ancient Christian church of Montanism. The Montanists, whose church spread all over the Roman Empire, expected the New Jerusalem to descend to earth at Tymion and the nearby town of Pepuza; Pepuza was the headquarters of Montanism and the seat of the Montanist patriarch. One of the founders of Montanism, Montanus, called both towns "Jerusalem." In late antiquity, both places attracted crowds of pilgrims from all over the Roman Empire. Women played an emancipated role in Montanism. They could become priests and also bishops. In the 6th century CE, this church became extinct.

Since 2001, Peter Lampe of the University of Heidelberg has directed annual archaeological campaigns in Phrygia, Turkey. During these interdisciplinary campaigns, together with William Tabbernee of Tulsa, numerous unknown ancient settlements were discovered and archaeologically documented. Two of them are the best candidates so far in the search for the identification of the two holy centers of ancient Montanism, Pepuza and Tymion. Scholars had searched for these lost sites since the 19th century.

The archaeological site at Şükranje (Karahallı area) that Peter Lampe identified as Tymion was already settled in late Bronze and early Iron Ages. It flourished in Roman and Byzantine times as a rural town where predominantly tenant farmers lived. They worked on an imperial estate and were often oppressed by travelling magistrates or imperial slaves. In a petition, the farmers asked for help from the emperor. The emperor Septimius Severus wrote back that his procurator would support the farmers. The imperial rescript is preserved on an inscription.

Uşak Province

Uşak (Turkish: Uşak ili) is a province in western Turkey. Its adjacent provinces are Manisa to the west, Denizli to the south, Afyon to the east, and Kütahya to the north. The provincial capital is Uşak, and its licence location code is 64. The province covers an area of 5,341 km2.

In August 2018, the province decided to stop running digital advertisement on United States based social media platforms like Facebook, Google, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube canceling all of the budget as a response to the U.S. sanctions on Turkey. The U.S. sanctions were over the detention of the Pastor Andrew Brunson.

Imperial conversion
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Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches

Languages

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