Advertising Age

Advertising Age, or Ad Age, is a global media brand publishing analysis, news and data on marketing and media. The magazine was started as a broadsheet newspaper in Chicago in 1930.[1] Today, its content appears in multiple formats, including AdAge.com, daily e-mail newsletters, social channels, events and a bimonthly print magazine.

Ad Age is based in New York City. Its parent company, Detroit-based Crain Communications,[2] is a privately held publishing company with more than 30 magazines, including Autoweek, Crain's New York Business, Crain's Chicago Business, Crain's Detroit Business, and Automotive News.

Advertising Age
AdAge logo
EditorBrian Braiker
CategoriesAdvertising and Marketing
PublisherJosh Golden
Year foundedJanuary 11, 1930
CompanyCrain Communications, Inc.
CountryUnited States
Based inNew York, NY
LanguageEnglish
Websiteadage.com

History

Advertising Age launched as a broadsheet newspaper in Chicago in 1930.

In 1999, Advertising Age published a list of the top 100 players in advertising history. Among these were Alvin Achenbaum, Bill Backer, Marion Harper Jr., Mary Wells Lawrence, ACNielsen, David Ogilvy, and J. Walter Thompson. In 1980, Henderson Advertising, founded by James M. Henderson in Greenville, South Carolina, became the first agency outside New York or Chicago to be named "Advertising Agency of the Year" by Advertising Age.[3]

The site AdCritic.com was acquired by The Ad Age Group in March 2002.[4]

An industry trade magazine, BtoB, was folded into Advertising Age in January 1, 2014.[5]

In 2017, Ad Age underwent its first major rebrand in 87 years.[6]

References

  1. ^ "Ad Age Comes of Age: A Timeline of Classic Covers". Archived from the original on 2017-10-04. Retrieved 2017-10-04.
  2. ^ "Crain Communications, Inc.|Company Profile|Vault.com". Vault. Archived from the original on 2016-11-15. Retrieved November 14, 2016.
  3. ^ "James M. Henderson (1921-1995)". knowitall.org. Archived from the original on 2013-06-12. Retrieved May 4, 2014.
  4. ^ "Trade-mag publisher absorbs AdCritic". CNET. Archived from the original on 2016-12-15. Retrieved August 16, 2016.
  5. ^ D.B. Hebbard (October 1, 2013). "Crain Communications says it will fold BtoB magazine into Advertising Age in 2014". Talking New Media. Archived from the original on 2017-02-02. Retrieved January 18, 2017.
  6. ^ "After 87 Years, Ad Age Rebrands For A New Era". Co.Design. 2017-09-29. Archived from the original on 2017-10-03. Retrieved 2017-10-04.

External links

1984 (advertisement)

"1984" is an American television commercial that introduced the Apple Macintosh personal computer. It was conceived by Steve Hayden, Brent Thomas and Lee Clow at Chiat\Day, produced by New York production company Fairbanks Films, and directed by Ridley Scott. English athlete Anya Major performed as the unnamed heroine and David Graham as Big Brother. It first aired in 10 local outlets, including Twin Falls, Idaho, where Chiat\Day ran the ad on December 31, 1983, at the last possible break before midnight on KMVT, so that the advertisement qualified for 1983 advertising awards. Its second televised airing, and only national airing, was on January 22, 1984, during a break in the third quarter of the telecast of Super Bowl XVIII by CBS.In one interpretation of the commercial, "1984" used the unnamed heroine to represent the coming of the Macintosh (indicated by her white tank top with a stylized line drawing of Apple’s Macintosh computer on it) as a means of saving humanity from "conformity" (Big Brother). These images were an allusion to George Orwell's noted novel, Nineteen Eighty-Four, which described a dystopian future ruled by a televised "Big Brother". The estate of George Orwell and the television rightsholder to the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four considered the commercial to be a copyright infringement and sent a cease-and-desist letter to Apple and Chiat\Day in April 1984.Originally a subject of contention within Apple, it has subsequently been called a watershed event and a masterpiece in advertising. In 1995, The Clio Awards added it to its Hall of Fame, and Advertising Age placed it on the top of its list of 50 greatest commercials.

AQuantive

aQuantive, Inc. was the parent company of a group of three digital marketing service and technology companies: Avenue A/Razorfish, Atlas Solutions, and DRIVE Performance Solutions. Based in Seattle, Washington, the company was founded in 1997. According to Advertising Age magazine, in 2005 it ranked 14th by revenue among advertising agencies worldwide.

On May 18, 2007, Microsoft announced that it would acquire the company for US $6 billion, the largest acquisition in Microsoft's history until its 2011 purchase of Skype. The acquisition closed on August 10, 2007. aQuantive became part of Microsoft's newly created Advertiser and Publisher Solutions (APS) Group.

On July 2, 2012, Microsoft announced that it would take a $6.2 billion writedown, mostly related to the 2007 acquisition of aQuantive.

Adweek

Adweek is a weekly American advertising trade publication that was first published in 1978. Adweek covers creativity, client–agency relationships, global advertising, accounts in review, and new campaigns. During this time, it has covered several notable shifts, including cable television, the shift away from commission-based agency fees, and the Internet.

As the second-largest advertising-trade publication, its main competitor is Advertising Age. Adweek also operates various blogs focusing on the advertising and mass media industry, including its flagship AdFreak blog and the Adweek Blog Network, which was formed from the assets of Mediabistro.

Related publications include Adweek Magazine's Technology Marketing (ISSN 1536-2272), and Adweek's Marketing Week (ISSN 0892-8274).In January 2018, Adweek CEO Jeffrey Litvack announced Brandweek, the event, as a first-of-its-kind brand summit to be held September 23-25, 2018 in Palm Springs, Calif., at the Omni Rancho Las Palmas Resort & Spa. Brandweek is a one-of-a-kind three-day brand marketing symposium and a part of Adweek, LLC. It was also previously a weekly American marketing trade publication that was published between 1986 and April 2011.

Autoweek

Autoweek is a car culture publication based in Detroit, Michigan. It was first published in 1958 and in 1977 the publication was purchased by Crain Communications Inc, its current parent company.[5] The magazine is published twice a month and focuses on motor sports, new car reviews, and old cars, events and DIY. Autoweek also publishes Autoweek.com.

Autoweek is owned by Crain Communications Inc., publisher of leading industry trade publications Advertising Age and Automotive News, among others, and is based in Detroit, Michigan.

The Autoweek also includes an Autoweek iPhone and iPad app.

BBDO

BBDO is a worldwide advertising agency network, with its headquarters in New York City. The agency began in 1891 with George Batten's Batten Company, and later in 1928, through a merger of BDO (Barton, Durstine & Osborn) and Batten Co. the agency became Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn. BBDO Worldwide has been named the "Most Awarded Agency Network in the World" by The Gunn Report for six consecutive years beginning 2005. It has won "Network of the Year" at the Cannes Lions five times. With more than 15,000 employees in 289 offices in 80 countries, it is the largest of three global networks (BBDO, DDB, TBWA) of agencies in Omnicom's portfolio. BBDO was named Global Agency of the Year by Adweek in 2011. It has also been named Agency of the Year in 2005 by Adweek, Advertising Age, and Campaign. In 2006, Mayor Michael Bloomberg proclaimed January 10 as BBDO day in recognition of the strength of its advertising, as well as its contributions to New York City.

Bob Garfield

Bob Garfield (born c. 1955) is an American journalist and commentator. He is a co-host of On the Media from WNYC, alongside Brooke Gladstone. He is also the host of The Genius Dialogues from Audible. Until 2010, he wrote the "Ad Review" TV-commercial criticism feature in Advertising Age. From 1986 to 1999, Garfield was a roving correspondent for All Things Considered and was a longtime advertising analyst for ABC News.

Budweiser

Budweiser () is an American-style pale lager produced by Anheuser-Busch, currently part of the transnational corporation Anheuser-Busch InBev. Introduced in 1876 by Carl Conrad & Co. of St. Louis, Missouri, it has grown to become one of the largest selling beers in the United States, and is available in over 80 markets worldwide—though, due to a trademark dispute, not necessarily under the Budweiser name. It is made with up to 30% rice in addition to hops and barley malt. Produced in various breweries around the world, Budweiser is a filtered beer available in draft and packaged forms.

Crain's Chicago Business

Crain's Chicago Business is a weekly business newspaper in Chicago. It is owned by Detroit-based Crain Communications, a privately held publishing company with more than 30 magazines, including Advertising Age, Modern Healthcare, Crain's New York Business, Crain's Detroit Business, Crain's Cleveland Business, and Automotive News. It has a print circulation of 53,313 and a readership of 219,693 per week. ChicagoBusiness.com, the paper's digital equivalent, draws over 1 million unique visitors per month and over 2.2 million page views per month.

Crain Communications

Crain Communications Inc is an American multi-industry publishing conglomerate based in Detroit, Michigan. with 13 non-USA subsidiaries.

DDB Worldwide

DDB Worldwide Communications Group Inc., known internationally as DDB, is a worldwide marketing communications network. It is owned by Omnicom Group Inc, one of the world's largest advertising holding companies (revenues US$12.69B according to Advertising Age in April 2008). The international advertising networks Doyle Dane Bernbach and Needham Harper merged their worldwide agency operations to become DDB Needham in 1986. At that same time the owners of Doyle Dane Bernbach, Needham Harper and BBDO merged their shareholdings to form the worldwide holding company Omnicom. In 1996, DDB Needham became known as DDB Worldwide.

Latina (magazine)

Latina is an American lifestyle, entertainment, beauty and fashion magazine for bilingual, bicultural Hispanic women published in English by Latina Media Ventures.

In May 2010, Latina Media Ventures named editorial director Galina Espinoza and publisher Lauren Michaels co-presidents of the company. Latina was named to Adweek's "Hot List" in 2000 and 2001 and named Best Magazine by Advertising Age in 2000.

Mark Romanek videography

American filmmaker Mark Romanek directed his first music video in 1986, for The The's "Sweet Bird of Truth". He earned his first MTV Video Music Award for Best Direction nomination for "Free Your Mind", performed by En Vogue, in 1993. Romanek later directed "Closer" for the industrial rock band Nine Inch Nails, which contains imagery involving terror, sexuality, and animal cruelty. In 1995, he directed the video for "Scream", set in space and performed by Michael and Janet Jackson, as well as the New Age surrealistic "Bedtime Story", performed by Madonna. They are two of the most expensive music videos ever made, costing $7 million and $5 million, respectively. "Scream" gained 11 nominations at the 1995 MTV Video Music Awards, including Romanek's second Best Direction nomination, and his first Grammy Award for Best Music Video, Short Form.In 1996, Romanek directed the Mary Poppins-inspired "Novocaine for the Soul" for the rock band Eels. The following year, he directed Fiona Apple's "Criminal", which explores themes of voyeurism and adolescence; and won his second Grammy Award for Best Music Video, Short Form for "Got 'til It's Gone", performed by Janet Jackson, Q-Tip and Joni Mitchell. For his work in "Hurt" (2003), performed by Johnny Cash, Romanek earned another MTV nomination, and won his third Grammy. In 2004, he directed the auto-biographical music video for Jay-Z's "99 Problems", for which he won his first MTV award. Their subsequent collaborations—the installation-style 10-minute short film for "Picasso Baby" (2013), and the animation video for "The Story of O.J." (2017)—were nominated for Grammy Award for Best Music Video.Romanek made his feature-film directorial debut with the 1986 comedy-drama feature Static, which was nominated for Grand Jury Prize at the 1986 Sundance Film Festival. He received a Saturn Award for Best Writing nomination for his work in the psychological thriller One Hour Photo (2002), which starred Robin Williams. In 2010, he directed the romantic drama film Never Let Me Go, starring Carey Mulligan, Keira Knightley and Andrew Garfield, for which he was nominated for British Independent Film Award for Best Director. Romanek also directed several commercials for iPod, Nike, and ESPN.

OMD Worldwide

OMD Worldwide is a global media communications agency. It is a subsidiary of Omnicom Group.

OMD has also been acknowledged as Most Creative Media Agency by The Gunn Report for Media eleven consecutive times; Adweek Global Media Agency of the Year for 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013 and 2019; and 2002, 2005, 2009 and 2011 Media Agency of the Year by Advertising Age.

Ogilvy (agency)

Ogilvy is a New York City-based British advertising, marketing, and public relations agency. It was founded in 1850 by Edmund Mather as a London-based agency. In 1964, the firm became known as Ogilvy & Mather after merging with a New York City agency that was founded in 1948 by David Ogilvy. The agency is known for its work with Dove, American Express, and IBM. It is now part of the WPP Group, one of the largest advertising and public relations companies in the world. The company provides services in six areas: brand strategy, advertising, customer engagement and commerce, public relations and influence, digital transformation, and partnerships. The company's strategy division OgilvyRED became Ogilvy Consulting.

People (magazine)

People is an American weekly magazine of celebrity and human-interest stories, published by Time Inc., a subsidiary of the Meredith Corporation. With a readership of 46.6 million adults, People has the largest audience of any American magazine. People had $997 million in advertising revenue in 2011, the highest advertising revenue of any American magazine. In 2006, it had a circulation of 3.75 million and revenue expected to top $1.5 billion. It was named "Magazine of the Year" by Advertising Age in October 2005, for excellence in editorial, circulation, and advertising. People ranked number 6 on Advertising Age's annual "A-list" and number 3 on Adweek's "Brand Blazers" list in October 2006.

The magazine runs a roughly 50/50 mix of celebrity and human-interest articles. People's editors claim to refrain from printing pure celebrity gossip, enough to lead celebrity publicists to propose exclusives to the magazine, and evidence of what one staffer calls a "publicist-friendly strategy".People's website, People.com, focuses on celebrity news and human interest stories. In February 2015, the website broke a new record: 72 million unique visitors.People is perhaps best known for its yearly special issues naming the "World's Most Beautiful", "Best & Worst Dressed", and "Sexiest Man Alive". The magazine's headquarters are in New York, and it maintains editorial bureaus in Los Angeles and in London. For economic reasons, it closed bureaus in Austin, Miami, and Chicago in 2006.

SK-II

SK-II (pronounced S-K-Two) is a Japanese cosmetics brand launched in the early 1980s based on a compound derived from yeast. It is owned by parent company Procter & Gamble (P&G) and is sold and marketed as a premium skin care solution in East Asia as well as North America, Europe and Australia.

Steve Lacy (businessman)

Stephen M. Lacy is an American magazine and media company executive. He is Executive Chairman of Meredith Corporation, a publicly traded publishing, broadcasting and interactive media firm based in Des Moines, Iowa. He took over as CEO of Meredith from retiring president Bill Kerr on July 1, 2006, and has continued expanding Meredith's interactive division, overseeing the acquisition of four online media agencies, including Los Angeles-based design firm O'Grady Meyers and Washington, D.C.-based New Media Strategies.Under Lacy's supervision, Publishers Information Bureau-measured ad revenues for Better Homes & Gardens increased by nearly $100 million since 2002, described by the industry as "amazing for a 'mature' magazine." Lacy also drew praise for his December 2002 acquisition of the American Baby Group from Primedia, opening up Meredith's access to moms, a magazine demographic key to Meredith's "family friendly" image. In 2003, Advertising Age selected Lacy as its Publishing Executive of the Year at its annual conference.

Virginia is for Lovers

"Virginia is for Lovers" is the tourism and travel slogan of the U.S. commonwealth of Virginia. Used since 1969, it has become a well-recognized and often imitated part of American jargon. In 2012, Advertising Age called "Virginia is for Lovers" "one of the most iconic ad campaigns in the past 50 years."A team led by David N. Martin and George Woltz of Martin and Woltz Inc. of Richmond, Virginia created the slogan after winning the Virginia State Travel account in 1968. Originally, they had come up with history ads, "Virginia is for History Lovers"; beach ads, "Virginia is for Beach Lovers"; and mountain ads, "Virginia is for Mountain Lovers." This approach was eventually discarded as too limiting, and the qualifiers were dropped. "Virginia is for Lovers" was born. Martin and Woltz Inc. eventually gained prominence and grew to become The Martin Agency. In 1969, the Virginia State Travel Service (now the Virginia Tourism Corporation) adopted the "Virginia is for Lovers" slogan and the first ad campaign using the tagline appeared in March 1969, in an issue of Modern Bride.

In 2009, "Virginia is for Lovers" was inducted into the Madison Avenue Advertising Walk of Fame, a creation of Advertising Week, the largest collection of advertising, marketing and media professionals in North America. These inductees were also included in the Advertising Icon Museum. Also in 2009, "Virginia is for Lovers" was acknowledged as one of the top ten tourism marketing campaigns of all time by Forbes.com. In 2016, the Virginia Tourism Corporation began selling apparel with a rainbow-colored heart in the logo as part of a LGBT tourism promotion campaign. The slogan began appearing on the state's license plates in 2014 and the state's welcome signs in 2015.

The slogan has been mentioned by a variety of artists over the years. American Idol winner, Jordin Sparks, recorded a song called "Virginia is for Lovers" in 2007, which was featured as a bonus track on her eponymous debut album. The slogan is mentioned in The Hold Steady song, "Killer Parties", and Willie Adler, guitarist for Lamb of God, has the slogan printed on the neck of his custom guitars. The slogan is also mentioned in the Kenny Chesney song, "Get Along."

There is a public perception that the 1968 design of the slogan is a response to the 1967 court ruling in Loving v. Virginia, which legalized interracial marriage in the United States after an interracial couple were issued jail sentences for marrying in violation of Virginia law. The ad agency which designed the slogan has denied intent to connect the slogan to that court case.

Where do you want to go today?

“Where do you want to go today?” was the title of Microsoft’s 2nd global image advertising campaign. The broadcast, print and outdoor advertising campaign was launched in November 1994 through the advertising agency Wieden+Kennedy, the firm best known for its work on behalf of Nike, Inc. The campaign, which The New York Times described as taking “a winsome, humanistic approach to demystifying technology”, had Microsoft spending $100 million through July 1995, of which $25 million would be spent during the holiday shopping season ending in December 1994.Tony Kaye directed a series of television ads filmed in Hong Kong, Prague and New York City that showed a broad range of people using their PCs. The television ads were first broadcast in Australia on November 13, the following day in both the United States and Canada, with Britain, France and Germany seeing the spots in subsequent days. An eight-page print ad described the personal computer as “an open opportunity for everybody” that “[facilitates] the flow of information so that good ideas —wherever they come from— can be shared”, and was placed in mass-market magazines including National Geographic, Newsweek, People, Rolling Stone and Sports Illustrated.In August 1995, the Times reported that the response to Microsoft’s campaign in the advertising trade press had been “lukewarm” and quoted Brad Johnson of Advertising Age as stating that “Microsoft is on version 1.0 in advertising. Microsoft is not standing still. It will improve its advertising.” Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer, then the firm’s executive vice president, acknowledged that the response to the campaign had been “chilly”.In June 1999, Microsoft announced that it would be ending its nearly five-year-long relationship with Wieden+Kennedy, shifting $100 million in billings to McCann Erickson Worldwide Advertising in a split that was described by The New York Times as mutual. Dan Wieden, president and chief creative officer of the advertising agency, characterized the relationship with Microsoft as “intense” and said that it had “run its course”.

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