Ade Schwammel

Adolphe "Ade" John Schwammel (October 14, 1908 – November 18, 1979)[1] was an American football tackle who played five seasons in the National Football League with the Green Bay Packers.

Ade Schwammel
Position:Tackle
Personal information
Born:October 14, 1908
Los Angeles, California
Died:November 18, 1979 (aged 71)
Honolulu, Hawaii
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:225 lb (102 kg)
Career information
College:Oregon State
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

High school career

Schwammel attended Fremont High School in Oakland, California and starred in football.

College career

Schwammel chose to enroll at Oregon State for his college education and to play football. He ettered in football from 1931 through 1933, earning first team All-American and All-Pacific Coast Conference at tackle as a senior was chosen as an All-American at tackle for the 1933 season, for a team that had a 6-2-2 record that included a win over powerhouse Fordham University and a scoreless tie with the USC Trojans, ending USC's 26-game winning streak in a game played with exactly 11 players without any substitutions by Oregon State.[2] He was also chosen to play in the 1934 East-West Shrine Game.[3]

Schwammel was one of the key players in the now illegal "Pyramid Play" where the Beavers hoisted 6'7" Clyde Devine atop the shoulders of 6'2" Schwammel and 6'2" teammate Harry Shields in order to block a placekick. The play was first successfully used in a game against the University of Oregon, and a picture of the play published in the Saturday Evening Post brought the team — and the play — national attention, leading to the pyramid technique being banned by the NCAA's rules committee shortly thereafter.[4]

Schwammel was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity during his time at Oregon State.[3]

Professional career

Schwammel played in the NFL for five seasons with the Green Bay Packers, in two separate stints, from 1934–1936 and from 1943–1944, with a gap of seven years for service in World War II. During his time with the Packers, they won two professional titles.[5]

Legacy

Schwammel was named to the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in 1981[6] and the Oregon State University Hall of Fame in 1990, both for his football prowess.[7] He died in Honolulu, Hawaii in November 1979.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b "Social Security Death Index Search Results". Retrieved 2007-12-26.
  2. ^ Welsch, Jeff. "Tales from Oregon State Sports", via Google Books. Accessed January 2, 2008. "They had been out there the entire game, playing both sides of the ball, without substitution."
  3. ^ a b "Ade Schwammel Collection, 1932-19343". osulibrary.oregonstate.edu. Archived from the original on 2007-11-13. Retrieved 2007-12-26.
  4. ^ "Football Play - The Pyramid, 1933". osulibrary.oregonstate.edu. Archived from the original on 20 December 2007. Retrieved 2007-12-26.
  5. ^ "Ade Schwammel". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved 2007-12-26.
  6. ^ "Inductees: Football". Oregon Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. Archived from the original on September 26, 2007. Retrieved 2007-12-26.
  7. ^ "Oregon State University Sports Hall of Fame". Oregon State Sports Information. Archived from the original on 2015-11-20. Retrieved 2007-12-26.

External links

1933 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1933 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1933 college football season. The organizations selecting teams in 1933 included the Associated Press (AP), the Newspaper Enterprise Association, and the United Press (UP).

1935 All-Pro Team

The 1935 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1935 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press (UP), the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. The following six players were selected to the first team by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; New York Giants halfback Ed Danowski; Chicago Cardinals end Bill Smith; Chicago Bears end Bill Karr; New York Giants tackle Bill Morgan; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1936 All-Pro Team

The 1936 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1936 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Four players were selected for the first team by all four selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Boston Redskins halfback Cliff Battles; Chicago Bears end Bill Hewitt; and Green Bay Packers guard Lon Evans. Three others were selected for the first team by three selectors: Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; Boston Redskins tackle Turk Edwards; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1943 Green Bay Packers season

The 1943 Green Bay Packers season was their 25th overall and their 23rd season in the National Football League. The club posted a 7–2–1 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a second-place finish in the Western Conference.

1944 Green Bay Packers season

The 1944 Green Bay Packers season was their 26th season overall and their 24th season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–2 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning them a first-place finish in the Western Conference. The Packers ended the season beating the New York Giants 14–7 in the NFL Championship Game, their sixth league title. Don Hutson led the NFL in touchdowns for a record-setting eighth time in his career.

1979

1979 (MCMLXXIX)

was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1979th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 979th year of the 2nd millennium, the 79th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1970s decade.

Fremont High School (Oakland, California)

Fremont High School is an urban public high school located in the Fruitvale District of East Oakland, California, United States. It was formerly a group of smaller high schools located on the same campus and known as Fremont Federation of High Schools. The school's present configuration is that of the "wall to wall" career academies model, consisting of a 9th Grade House which feeds into one of two California Partnership Academies (CPA), specifically the Architecture Academy and the Media Academy.

List of Oregon State University athletes

This list of Oregon State University athletes includes graduates, non-graduate former students and current students of Oregon State University who are notable for their achievements within athletics, sometimes before or after their time at Oregon State. Other alumni can be found in the list of Oregon State University alumni; notable administration, faculty, and staff can be found on the list of Oregon State University faculty and staff. All intercollegiate sports teams at Oregon State are called the Oregon State Beavers.

Lon Stiner

Alonzo L. "Lon" Stiner (June 20, 1903 – March 8, 1985) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Oregon State University from 1933 to 1948, compiling a record of 74–49–17.

Oregon State Beavers football

The Oregon State Beavers football team represents Oregon State University in NCAA Division I FBS college football. The team first fielded an organized football team in 1893 and is a member of the Pac-12 Conference's North Division. Jonathan Smith has been the head coach since November 29, 2017. Their home games are played at Reser Stadium in Corvallis, Oregon.

Pyramid Play

The Pyramid Play is a defensive play in American football, where a defensive player is hoisted up by two other players in an effort to block a place kick attempt by the opposing team. The play was created and implemented by the 1933 Oregon State Agricultural College team (now known as Oregon State University).

Schwammel

Schwammel may refer to:

Ade Schwammel (1908 – 1979), American football offensive tackle

schwammeL, a mild profanity in the Kalix language

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