Addison-Wesley

Addison-Wesley is a publisher of textbooks and computer literature. It is an imprint of Pearson PLC, a global publishing and education company. In addition to publishing books, Addison-Wesley also distributes its technical titles through the Safari Books Online e-reference service. Addison-Wesley's majority of sales derive from the United States (55%) and Europe (22%).[1]

The Addison-Wesley Professional Imprint produces content including books, eBooks, and video for the professional IT worker including developers, programmers, managers, system administrators. Classic titles include The Art of Computer Programming, The C++ Programming Language, The Mythical Man-Month, and Design Patterns. Addison-Wesley Professional is also a partner with Safari Books Online.

Addison-Wesley
Addison Wesley Logo 2015
Parent companyPearson Education
Founded1942
FounderLew Addison Cummings, Melbourne Wesley Cummings
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationBoston
Publication typesTextbooks
Nonfiction topicsComputer Science, Economics, Finance, Mathematics, and Statistics
Fiction genrestextbooks
Official websitewww.pearsonschool.com (school),
www.pearsonhighered.com (higher education),
informit.com (professional)

History

Melbourne Wesley Cummings and Lew Addison Cummings founded Addison-Wesley in 1942, with the first book published by Addison-Wesley being Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Francis Weston Sears' Mechanics. Its first computer book was Programs for an Electronic Digital Computer, by Wilkes, Wheeler, and Gill. In 1977, Addison-Wesley acquired W. A. Benjamin Company, and merged it with the Cummings division of the company to form Benjamin Cummings. It was purchased by the global publishing and education company, Pearson PLC in 1988[2] and became part of Addison Wesley Longman in 1994. The trade publishing division of Addison-Wesley was sold to Perseus Books Group in 1997, leaving Addison-Wesley as solely an educational publisher.[3] Pearson acquired the educational division of Simon & Schuster in 1998, and merged it with Addison Wesley Longman to form Pearson Education and subsequently rebranded to Pearson in 2011. Pearson moved the former Addison Wesley Longman offices from Reading, Massachusetts to Boston in 2004. Its current executives hail from the original Addison-Wesley with a storied history of their own.

Notable books

References

  1. ^ "Pearson PLC (PSO) Company Profile | Reuters.com". reuters.com. Retrieved 14 November 2012.
  2. ^ "History". Pearson. Archived from the original on 2006-07-11. Retrieved 2013-05-14.
  3. ^ "Perseus Books Buys Addison-Wesley Unit". The New York Times. December 22, 1997. Retrieved November 13, 2011.

External links

Artificial Reality

Artificial reality is a book series by Myron W. Krueger about interactive immersive environments (or virtual realities), based on video recognition techniques, that put a user in full, unencumbered contact with the digital world. He started this work in the late 1960s and is considered to be a key figure in the early innovation of virtual reality. Artificial Reality was published in 1983 and updated in Artificial Reality II in 1991 (both published by Addison-Wesley).

Benjamin Cummings

Benjamin Cummings specializes in science and is a publishing imprint of Pearson Education, the world's largest education publishing and technology company, which is part of Pearson PLC, the global publisher and former owner of Penguin Books and the Financial Times. Benjamin Cummings publishes medical textbooks, anatomy and physiology laboratory manuals, biology and microbiology textbooks, and health/kinesiology textbooks.Cummings Publishing Company was formed in 1968 as a division of Addison-Wesley. In 1977, Addison-Wesley purchased the W. A. Benjamin Company and merged it with Cummings. Benjamin Cummings, along with the rest of Addison-Wesley, was purchased by Pearson in 1988.

C

C is the third letter in the English alphabet and a letter of the alphabets of many other writing systems which inherited it from the Latin alphabet. It is also the third letter of the ISO basic Latin alphabet. It is named cee (pronounced ) in English.

Circumference

In geometry, the circumference (from Latin circumferens, meaning "carrying around") of a circle is the (linear) distance around it. That is, the circumference would be the length of the circle if it were opened up and straightened out to a line segment. Since a circle is the edge (boundary) of a disk, circumference is a special case of perimeter. The perimeter is the length around any closed figure and is the term used for most figures excepting the circle and some circular-like figures such as ellipses.

Informally, "circumference" may also refer to the edge itself rather than to the length of the edge.

Computer program

A computer program is a collection of instructions that performs a specific task when executed by a computer. A computer requires programs to function.

A computer program is usually written by a computer programmer in a programming language. From the program in its human-readable form of source code, a compiler can derive machine code—a form consisting of instructions that the computer can directly execute. Alternatively, a computer program may be executed with the aid of an interpreter.

A collection of computer programs, libraries, and related data are referred to as software. Computer programs may be categorized along functional lines, such as application software and system software. The underlying method used for some calculation or manipulation is known as an algorithm.

In software engineering, code refers to computer instructions and data definitions expressed in a programming language or in a form output by an assembler, compiler, or other translator to express a computer program in a programming language.

Concrete Mathematics

Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science, by Ronald Graham, Donald Knuth, and Oren Patashnik, first published in 1989, is a textbook that is widely used in computer-science departments as a substantive but light-hearted treatment of the analysis of algorithms.

Hacker's Delight

Hacker's Delight is a software algorithm book by Henry S. Warren, Jr. and published by Addison-Wesley Professional. The first edition was released in 2002, and the second in 2013. It discusses a variety of programming algorithms for common tasks involving integer types, often with the aim of performing the minimum number of operations or replacing slow operations by faster ones (e.g., converting a divide by a constant into a multiply by another constant that gives the same result). The second edition has new chapters on cyclic redundancy code and other error correcting codes. It also had a new appendix containing graphs of discrete functions.

Ivar Jacobson

Ivar Hjalmar Jacobson (born 1939) is a Swedish computer scientist and software engineer, known as major contributor to UML, Objectory, Rational Unified Process (RUP), aspect-oriented software development and Essence.

James Gosling

James Arthur Gosling, OC (born May 19, 1955) is a Canadian computer scientist, best known as the founder and lead designer behind the Java programming language.

Martin Fowler (software engineer)

Martin Fowler (born 1963) is a British software developer, author and international public speaker on software development, specialising in object-oriented analysis and design, UML, patterns, and agile software development methodologies, including extreme programming.

His 1999 book Refactoring popularised the practice of code refactoring. In 2004 he introduced Presentation Model (PM), an architectural pattern.

Pearson Education

Pearson Education is a British-owned education publishing and assessment service to schools and corporations, as well as directly to students. Pearson owns educational media brands including Addison–Wesley, Peachpit, Prentice Hall, eCollege, Longman, Scott Foresman, and others.

Pearson is part of Pearson plc, which formerly owned the Financial Times. It was created in July 1998 when Pearson plc purchased the education division of Simon & Schuster from Viacom and merged it with its own education division, Addison-Wesley Longman, to form Pearson Education. Pearson Education was rebranded to Pearson in 2011 and split into an International and a North American division.

Although Pearson generates approximately 60 percent of its sales in North America, it operates in more than 70 countries.

Pearson International is headquartered in London, and maintains offices across Europe, Asia and South America. Its online chat support is based in the Philippines.

Pearson North America is headquartered at 330 Hudson in New York City, New York. It previously was located in Upper Saddle River, New Jersey.Pearson Italia SpA, also known as Pearson Paravia Bruno Mondadori, was created through the purchase of PBM Editori, which was in turn a merge of Paravia (based in Turin) and Bruno Mondadori (based in Milan).

Software design pattern

In software engineering, a software design pattern is a general, reusable solution to a commonly occurring problem within a given context in software design. It is not a finished design that can be transformed directly into source or machine code. It is a description or template for how to solve a problem that can be used in many different situations. Design patterns are formalized best practices that the programmer can use to solve common problems when designing an application or system.

Object-oriented design patterns typically show relationships and interactions between classes or objects, without specifying the final application classes or objects that are involved. Patterns that imply mutable state may be unsuited for functional programming languages, some patterns can be rendered unnecessary in languages that have built-in support for solving the problem they are trying to solve, and object-oriented patterns are not necessarily suitable for non-object-oriented languages.

Design patterns may be viewed as a structured approach to computer programming intermediate between the levels of a programming paradigm and a concrete algorithm.

The Art of Computer Programming

The Art of Computer Programming (TAOCP) is a comprehensive monograph written by Donald Knuth that covers many kinds of programming algorithms and their analysis.

Knuth began the project, originally conceived as a single book with twelve chapters, in 1962. The first three volumes of what was then expected to be a seven-volume set were published in 1968, 1969, and 1973. The first published installment of Volume 4 appeared in paperback as Fascicle 2 in 2005.

The hardback Volume 4A, combining Volume 4, Fascicles 0–4, was published in 2011. Volume 4, Fascicle 6 ("Satisfiability") was released in December 2015; Volume 4, Fascicle 5 ("Mathematical Preliminaries Redux; Backtracking; Dancing Links") is planned for release in September 2019. Fascicles 5 and 6 are expected to comprise the first two thirds of Volume 4B.

The C Programming Language

The C Programming Language (sometimes termed K&R, after its authors' initials) is a computer programming book written by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie, the latter of whom originally designed and implemented the language, as well as co-designed the Unix operating system with which development of the language was closely intertwined. The book was central to the development and popularization of the C programming language and is still widely read and used today. Because the book was co-authored by the original language designer, and because the first edition of the book served for many years as the de facto standard for the language, the book was regarded by many to be the authoritative reference on C.

The Meaning of It All

The Meaning of It All: Thoughts of a Citizen Scientist is a non-fiction book by the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman. It is a collection of three previously unpublished public lectures given by Feynman in 1963. The book was first published in hardcover in 1998, ten years after Feynman's death, by Addison–Wesley. Several paperback and audiobook editions of the book have subsequently been published.The Meaning of It All is non-technical book in which Feynman investigates the relationship between science and society.

Watts Humphrey

Watts S. Humphrey (July 4, 1927 – October 28, 2010) was an American pioneer in software engineering, who was called the "father of software quality."

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