Adams political family

The Adams family was a prominent political family in the United States from the late 18th through the early 20th centuries. Based in eastern Massachusetts, they formed part of the Boston Brahmin community. The surname Adams stems from Henry Adams of the county of Somerset in Great Britain.[1]

The Adams family is one of only four families to have produced two Presidents of the United States, the others being the Bush, Roosevelt, and Harrison families.

Adams family
Coat of Arms of John Quincy Adams
Motto: " Fidem libertatem amicitiam retinebis"
(Faith, freedom and fidelity)
Current regionMassachusetts, U.S.
Place of originBraintree, Essex, England
Connected familiesBaldwin family (U.S.)
Taft family (U.S.)
Spencer family (UK)
Estate(s)Peacefield, Quincy, Massachusetts

Members

Coat of Arms of John Adams
Coat of Arms of President John Adams.

Family tree

The following is a selective family tree of notable members of the Adams family relative to Charles Francis Adams IV:

 
President John Quincy Adams
 
Louisa Catherine Johnson
 
Peter Chardon Brooks
 
Abigail [Brown]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Charles Francis Adams Sr.
 
Abigail Brown [Brooks]
 
George Caspar Crowninshield
 
Harriet [Sears]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Charles Francis Adams Jr.
 
 
John Quincy Adams II
 
Frances Cadwalader [Crowninshield]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John Quincy Adams III
 
George Caspar Adams
 
Charles Francis Adams III
 
Frances [Lovering]
 
Frances C. Adams
 
Arthur Adams
 
Margery Lee [Sargeant]
 
Abigail ("Hitty") Adams
 
Robert Homans
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Catherine Lovering Adams
 
Henry Sturgis Morgan
 
Charles Francis Adams IV
 
Margaret [Stockton]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Children 3 Sons; 1 Daughter
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Five Sons
 
Abigail Adams
 
James C. Manny
 
Allison Adams
 
Paul G. Hagan
 
Timothy Adams
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Harvard University and the Adams family

Adams House, one of twelve residential colleges at Harvard, is named after John Adams and later members of the Adams family.

Memorials

See also

References

  1. ^ Walker, Jane C. (2002). John Adams. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishers, Inc. p. 14. ISBN 0766017044.
  2. ^ John Adams: Biography
  3. ^ John Adams bioguide at Congress.gov
  4. ^ John Quincy Adams bioguide at Politicalgraveyard.com
  5. ^ George Washington Adams bioguide at Politicalgraveyard.com
  6. ^ Charles Francis Adams Sr. bioguide at Congress.gov
  7. ^ John Quincy Adams II bioguide at Politicalgraveyard.com
  8. ^ Gardner, Augstus Peabody (December 1906). "George Caspar Adams". In Huddleston, John Henry. Secretary's report. Harvard College Class of 1886. HathiTrust. Report No. 6. New York: The De Vinne Press. pp. 7–8. OCLC 903610243. Retrieved 2018-06-12.
  9. ^ Charles Francis Adams III bioguide at Politicalgraveyard.com
  10. ^ Thomas Boylston Adams biography at Masshist.org
  11. ^ William E. McKibben (June 9, 1082). "Four More Years". Harvard Crimson. Retrieved August 23, 2014.
  12. ^ Eric Pace (June 9, 1997). "Thomas B. Adams Dies at 86; Descendant of Two Presidents". New York Times. Retrieved August 22, 2014. Adams... attended Harvard College from 1929 to 1932

Further reading

  • Robert J. Maddox, "The Adamses in America," American History Illustrated, Apr 1971, Vol. 6 Issue 1, p 12-21
Adams Memorial

The Adams Memorial is a proposed United States presidential memorial to honor the second President John Adams; his wife and prolific writer, Abigail Adams; their son, the sixth President, John Quincy Adams; John Quincy Adams' wife, Louisa Catherine Adams; and other members of the Adams family. The memorial would also honor John Quincy Adam's son, Charles Francis Adams, Sr., a Civil War diplomat, politician, and editor; and Charles' two sons, Henry Adams, a noted historian and autobiographer, and academician Brooks Adams.

The United States Congress authorized the Adams Memorial Foundation to proceed with the design and construction of a memorial on November 5, 2001. The foundation was authorized to raise private funds to construct a memorial on federal land in Washington, D.C. Once established, the memorial was then to be turned over to the federal government. On December 2, 2002, Congress amended this legislation to permit the Adams Memorial to be constructed within "Area 1", the central core of the District of Columbia centered on the National Mall.The Commemorative Works Clarification and Revision Act of 2003 (CWCRA), however, gave the Adams Memorial Foundation and other memorial efforts then under way just seven years to raise the funds and begin construction. When the memorial foundation was unable to raise the funds, Congress passed legislation on October 30, 2009, giving the Adams Memorial effort until September 30, 2010, to complete its fundraising. On December 2, 2009, Congress passed legislation applying the CWCRA to the Adams Memorial, although the clock began running with passage of the Area I authorization. Congress extended the deadline for fund-raising yet again on May 24, 2010, giving the memorial until December 2, 2013, to finish its efforts.Authorization for the Adams Memorial expired on December 2, 2013, without a memorial having begun construction. Congress again reauthorized the memorial on July 22, 2014, extending the deadline for an additional seven years, to December 2, 2020.

Adams Memorial (Saint-Gaudens)

The Adams Memorial is a grave marker located in Section E of Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, D.C., featuring a cast bronze allegorical sculpture by Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The shrouded figure is seated against a granite block which forms one side of a hexagonal plot, designed by architect Stanford White. Across a small light-toned granite plaza, a comfortable stone bench invites visitors to rest and meditate. The whole is sheltered by a close screen of dense conifers, more dense and uniform in 2015 than in the photograph to the right.

Adams National Historical Park

Adams National Historical Park, formerly Adams National Historic Site, in Quincy, Massachusetts, preserves the home of Presidents of the United States John Adams and John Quincy Adams, of U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, Charles Francis Adams, and of the writers and historians Henry Adams and Brooks Adams.

The national historical park's eleven buildings tell the story of five generations of the Adams family (from 1720 to 1927) including Presidents, First Ladies, U.S. Ministers, historians, writers, and family members who supported and contributed to their success. In addition to Peacefield, home to four generations of the Adams family, the park's main historic features include the John Adams Birthplace (October 30, 1735), the nearby John Quincy Adams Birthplace (July 11, 1767), and the Stone Library (built in 1870 to house the books of John Quincy Adams and believed to be the first presidential library), containing more than 14,000 historic volumes in 12 languages.

There is an off-site Visitors Center less than a mile (1.6 km) away. Regularly scheduled tours of the houses are offered in season (April 19 to November 10), by guided tour only, using a tourist trolley provided by the Park Service between sites. Access to United First Parish Church, where the Adamses worshipped and are buried, is provided by the congregation for which they ask a small donation. The church is across the street from the Visitors Center.

Brooks Adams

Peter Chardon Brooks Adams (June 24, 1848 – February 13, 1927) was an American historian, political scientist and a critic of capitalism.

Charles Adams (1770–1800)

Charles Adams (May 29, 1770 – November 30, 1800) was the second son of President John Adams and his wife, Abigail Adams (née Smith).

Charles Francis Adams III

Charles Francis Adams III known as Deacon (August 2, 1866 – June 10, 1954), was an American politician. He was a member of the prominent American Adams family, was the United States Secretary of the Navy under President Herbert Hoover and a well-known yachtsman.

Elihu Adams

Elihu Adams (May 29, 1741 – August 10, 1775) was a soldier in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. He was born in Braintree to John Adams, Sr. and Susanna Boylston; his elder brothers were John Adams, the second President of the United States, and Peter Boylston Adams, who also served as a militia captain during the Revolution. He married Thankful White in 1765, and had at least two children - Susanna, born in 1766, and John, born in 1768.Adams served as captain of the Braintree Company at the Siege of Boston, and as a minuteman who fought on the Concord Green in 1775. He died of dysentery on August 10, 1775, at the age of 34, and was buried at what is today known as the "Old Section" of Union Cemetery in Holbrook, Massachusetts (then still a part of Braintree).

George Washington Adams

George Washington Adams (April 12, 1801 – April 30, 1829) was the eldest son of John Quincy Adams, the sixth President of the United States. He had a troubled life and died of apparent suicide at age 28.

Henry Sturgis Morgan

Henry Sturgis Morgan Sr. (October 24, 1900 – February 8, 1982) was an American banker, known for being the co-founder of Morgan Stanley and the President & Chairman of the Morgan Library & Museum.

John Adams Birthplace

The John Adams Birthplace is a historic house at 133 Franklin Street in Quincy, Massachusetts. It is the saltbox home in which the second president of the United States, John Adams, was born in 1735. The house was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is now administered by the National Park Service as part of the Adams National Historical Park, and is open for guided tours.

John Adams II

John Adams II (July 4, 1803 – October 23, 1834) was an American government functionary and businessman. The second son of President John Quincy Adams and Louisa Adams, he is usually called John Adams II to distinguish him from President John Adams, his famous grandfather.

John Quincy Adams Birthplace

The John Quincy Adams Birthplace is a historic house at 141 Franklin Street in Quincy, Massachusetts. It is the saltbox home in which the sixth United States President, John Quincy Adams, was born in 1767. The family lived in this home during the time John Adams helped found the United States with his work on the Declaration of Independence and the American Revolutionary War. His own birthplace is only 75 feet (23 m) away, on the same property.

Both houses are National Historic Landmarks, and part of Adams National Historical Park, operated by the National Park Service.

John Quincy Adams II

John Quincy Adams II (September 22, 1833 – August 14, 1894) was an American lawyer, politician, and member of the Adams political family.

Peacefield

Peacefield, also called Old House, is a historic home formerly owned by the Adams family of Quincy, Massachusetts. It is now part of the Adams National Historical Park.

Samuel Adams (beer)

Samuel Adams is the flagship brand of the Boston Beer Company. The brand name (often shortened to Sam Adams) was chosen in honor of Founding Father Samuel Adams. Adams inherited his father's brewery on King Street (modern day State Street). Some histories say he was a brewer, while others describe him as a maltster. The Samuel Adams brewery is located in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, where visitors can take a tour, and shop beers and merchandise. Samuel Adams beer is brewed by the Boston Beer Company, which was founded by Jim Koch and Rhonda Kallman. Samuel Adams beer was started using a recipe now known as the Samuel Adams Boston Lager.

Susanna Boylston

Susanna Boylston Adams Hall (March 5, 1708 – April 17, 1797) was a prominent early-American socialite, mother of the second U.S. President, John Adams and grandmother of the sixth President, John Quincy Adams. Her parents were Peter Boylston (c. 1673–1743) and Anne White (1685–1772); her grandparents, Dr. Thomas Boylston (1644–1695) and Mary Gardner (1648–?) and Benjamin White (?–1722) and Susanna Cogswell (1656–1701).She married John Adams, Sr. in 1734. She is among the least well known of the famous Adams family, for her name appears infrequently in the large body of Adams writings. Historian David McCullough notes that no writings of hers survive, though it is known that others would often read to her, suggesting that she might have been illiterate. However, in his memoirs, John Adams himself wrote that "as my parents were both fond of reading...I was very early taught to read at home," indicating that his mother likely possessed at least a basic level of literacy.John Adams and Susanna Boylston Adams had the following children:

John Adams

Peter Boylston Adams – farmer, militia captain of Braintree, Massachusetts.

Elihu Adams – a company commander in the militia during the American Revolution; died from a dysentery.Five years after the death of her first husband, she married Lt. John Hall, who apparently did not get along with her grown children. She died around a month into her son's presidency.

The Adams Chronicles

The Adams Chronicles is a thirteen-episode miniseries by PBS that aired in 1976 to commemorate the American Bicentennial.

Thomas Boylston Adams (1772–1832)

Thomas Boylston Adams (May 4, 1772 – March 13, 1832) was the third and youngest son of the 2nd president of the United States, John and Abigail (Smith) Adams.

United First Parish Church

United First Parish Church is a Unitarian Universalist congregation in Quincy, Massachusetts, established as the parish church of Quincy in 1639. The current building was constructed in 1828 by noted Boston stonecutter Abner Joy to designs by Alexander Parris. The building was designated a National Historic Landmark on December 30, 1970, for its association with the Adams family, who funded its construction and whose most significant members are interred here.

It is called the Church of the Presidents because two American Presidents, John Adams and John Quincy Adams, attended the church along with their wives, Abigail Adams and Louisa Catherine Adams. All four are interred beneath the church in a family crypt. The pew in which they sat is marked with a plaque and ribbon on the side.

Adams family tree
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John Adams
(1735–1826)
 
Abigail Adams (née Smith)
(1744–1818)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
William Stephens Smith
(1755–1815)
 
Abigail Amelia Adams Smith
(1765–1813)
 
John Quincy Adams
(1767–1848)
 
Louisa Catherine Adams (née Johnson)
(1775–1852)
 
Charles Adams
(1770–1800)
 
Thomas Boylston Adams
(1772–1832)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
George Washington Adams
(1801–1829)
 
John Adams II
(1803–1834)
 
Charles Francis Adams Sr.
(1807–1886)
 
Abigail Brown Adams (née Brooks)
(1808–1889)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Frances Cadwalader Crowninshield
(1839–1911)
 
John Quincy Adams II
(1833–1894)
 
Charles Francis Adams Jr.
(1835–1915)
 
Henry Brooks Adams
(1838–1918)
 
Marian Hooper Adams
(1843–1885)
 
Peter Chardon Brooks Adams
(1848–1927)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
George Casper Adams
(1863–1900)
 
Charles Francis Adams III
(1866–1954)
 
Frances Adams (née Lovering)
(1869–1956)
 
 
 
 
John Adams
(1875–1964)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Charles Francis Adams IV
(1910–1999)
 
Catherine Lovering Adams Morgan
(1902–1988)
 
Henry Sturgis Morgan
(1900–1982)
 
Thomas Boylston Adams
(1910–1997)
 
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