Adam Silver

Adam Silver (born April 25, 1962) is an American lawyer and businessman who is the commissioner of the National Basketball Association (NBA).

Adam Silver
Adam Silver (15847004771)
5th Commissioner of the NBA
Assumed office
February 1, 2014
DeputyMark Tatum
Preceded byDavid Stern
Deputy Commissioner of the NBA
In office
July 2006 – February 1, 2014
CommissionerDavid Stern
Succeeded byMark Tatum
Personal details
BornApril 25, 1962 (age 56)
Rye, New York, U.S.
NationalityAmerican
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Maggie (m. 2015)
Alma materDuke University (BA)
University of Chicago (JD)
OccupationCommissioner of the National Basketball Association (NBA)

Early life

Silver was born into a Jewish-American family[1][2] north of New York City in the suburb of Rye in Westchester County. At an early age, Silver was a New York Knicks fan.[3]

He graduated from Rye High School,[4] and then from Duke University in 1984. He worked as a legislative aide for U.S. Congressman Les AuCoin from 1984 to 1985.[5] He earned a J.D. degree from the University of Chicago in 1988.[6]

Before joining the NBA, he served as a litigation associate at Cravath, Swaine & Moore, a law firm in New York. Silver also worked as a law clerk to Judge Kimba Wood, a federal judge for the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York.[7]

NBA career

Prior to becoming commissioner, Silver served as NBA Deputy Commissioner and Chief Operating Officer for eight years. In that role, he was instrumental to many of the league's signature achievements, including the negotiation of the league's last three collective bargaining agreements with the National Basketball Players Association, the development of the WNBA and NBA Development League, the partnership with Turner Broadcasting to manage the NBA's digital assets, and the creation of NBA China.

Before serving as the league's second-in-command, Silver spent more than eight years as President and COO, NBA Entertainment. Since joining the NBA in 1992, Silver has also held the positions of Senior VP & COO, NBA Entertainment, NBA Chief of Staff, and Special Assistant to the Commissioner.[8]

During his time with NBA Entertainment, Silver was an executive producer of the IMAX movie Michael Jordan to the Max, as well as the documentary Whatever Happened to Micheal Ray? He also worked on the production side of Like Mike and Year of the Yao.

Commissioner

On October 25, 2012, he was endorsed by David Stern to be the next NBA Commissioner when Stern announced that he would step down on February 1, 2014.[9][10][11]

On April 25, 2014, Silver witnessed a dramatic controversial moment, where Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling was cited for making racist remarks, during a private conversation with Sterling's girlfriend. TMZ Sports released a video of Sterling holding a conversation with his girlfriend about his racist remarks, which was made public. Silver responded on April 29, 2014, as he announced that Sterling had been banned from the NBA for life due to his racist remarks. In addition, Silver fined Sterling $2.5 million, the maximum allowed under the NBA Constitution. Furthermore, Silver stripped Sterling from virtually all of his authority over the Clippers, and urged owners to vote to expel Sterling from ownership of the Clippers. Moreover, Sterling was disallowed from entering any Clippers facility as well as attending any NBA games. It was one of the most severe punishments a commissioner ever imposed on a professional sports owner.[12]

On November 13, 2014, Silver published an op-ed piece in The New York Times, where he announced that he is in favor of legalized and regulated sports betting, mentioning that it "should be brought out of the underground and into the sunlight where it can be appropriately monitored and regulated".[13]

Honors

In 2016, Sports Business Journal ranked Silver No. 1 on its list of the 50 Most Influential People in Sports Business. In 2015, Silver was named Executive of the Year by Sports Business Journal.[14] That year he was also named one of Time's 100 Most Influential People[15] and one of Fortune's 50 Greatest Leaders.[16]

In 2014, he was named the Sports Illustrated Executive of the Year.[17]

Other

Silver serves on Duke University's Board of Trustees and received the 2016 Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of Chicago Law School.[18] He also serves on the board of the Lustgarten Pancreatic Cancer Foundation.[19]

Personal life

Silver has been married to his wife, Maggie, since 2015.[20] They have one daughter.[21]

References

  1. ^ Jerusalem Post: "Who was the most influential Jew in sports this past year?" By Uriel Sturm August 9, 2016
  2. ^ "Jewish groups slam racist rant attributed to Donald Sterling". Jewish Journal. Retrieved April 30, 2014.
  3. ^ Abbott, Henry (October 25, 2012). "Adam Silver: The NBA's next commissioner". ESPN. Retrieved May 1, 2013.
  4. ^ "Silver mettle". www.sportsbusinessdaily.com. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  5. ^ Lofton, John Lombardo; Terry Lefton (October 21, 2013). "Silver mettle". SportsBusiness Daily. Retrieved April 29, 2014.
  6. ^ "Duke alum Adam Silver named next NBA commissioner". DukeChronicle.com. October 26, 2012. Retrieved May 1, 2013.
  7. ^ Soshnick, Scott. "Silver Taking Over NBA With Stern Completing Turnaround". Businessweek. Archived from the original on November 14, 2014. Retrieved May 1, 2013.
  8. ^ "Profile from". NBA.com. Retrieved January 5, 2017.
  9. ^ "Stern to step aside in 2014; Silver to replace him". National Basketball Association. October 25, 2012. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  10. ^ Berger, Ken (February 25, 2012). "Stern anoints Silver as successor". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on February 2, 2014. Retrieved April 30, 2014.
  11. ^ Windhorst, Brian (October 25, 2012). "David Stern has date for retirement". ESPN.com. ESPN. Retrieved October 25, 2012.
  12. ^ "Clippers owner Sterling banned for life by the NBA". National Basketball Association. April 29, 2014. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  13. ^ Adam Silver (November 13, 2014). "N.B.A. Commissioner Adam Silver: Allow Gambling on Pro Games". The New York Times. Retrieved June 28, 2015.
  14. ^ "SBJ 2015 Executive of the Year". SBJ.
  15. ^ "Time 100 Most Influential - Adam Silver". Time Magazine.
  16. ^ "Fortune 50 Greatest Leaders- Adam Silver". Fortune Magazine.
  17. ^ Jenkins, Lee (December 11, 2014). "SI Executive of the Year- Adam Silver". Sports Illustrated.
  18. ^ "Apple CEO Cook, NBA commissioner Silver among 8 new trustees". dukechronicle.com. June 7, 2015. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  19. ^ Ramkumar, Amrith. "Lustgarten Foundation leadership". Lustgarten Foundation.
  20. ^ "NBA commissioner Adam Silver: I'm getting married - TODAY.com". TODAY. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  21. ^ @MagicJohnson (April 20, 2017). "Congratulations to Commissioner Adam Silver and his wife Maggie on the birth of their daughter Louise Burns Silver!" (Tweet) – via Twitter.

External links

2013 NBA draft

The 2013 NBA draft was held on June 27, 2013, at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York. National Basketball Association (NBA) teams took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players and other eligible players, including international players. The lottery took place on May 21, 2013. This was the first draft for New Orleans under their new Pelicans name after playing as the New Orleans Hornets previously. It would also be the last draft for the Charlotte Bobcats under their old name, as they went back to playing under their old Hornets moniker that they last used in 2002 once the 2013–14 NBA season was over. Anthony Bennett, the first pick, bounced around the league, and then was finally released by the Brooklyn Nets after averaging just 5.2 PPG. He is considered the most recent candidate of being named the worst #1 draft pick in recent memory, with next to no major media outlets even considering him a potential #1 pick up until the day of the draft.Highlights of the draft included the first Canadian number one selection (Anthony Bennett). The draft also included the first Canadian pair of lottery picks (Bennett and Kelly Olynyk), the first Iranian draft choice (Arsalan Kazemi), the first New Zealander first round pick (Steven Adams) and the last first round draft selections announced by then-NBA commissioner David Stern, the very last of which included a visit by Hakeem Olajuwon, Stern's first pick he ever announced back in 1984. He was replaced by current commissioner Adam Silver beginning with the 2014 NBA draft.

2014 NBA draft

The 2014 NBA draft was held on June 26, 2014, at Barclays Center in Brooklyn. National Basketball Association (NBA) teams took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players and other eligible players, including international players. The draft lottery took place on May 20, 2014. The Cleveland Cavaliers won the draft lottery to earn the first overall pick in the draft; this is the fourth number-one pick for Cleveland since 2003 and third number-one pick over a four-year span from 2011–2014. This draft would also be the first for the reborn Charlotte Hornets, who played as the Bobcats from 2004–2014, since 2001, when the original Charlotte Hornets last selected as the Charlotte Hornets before moving to New Orleans and eventually becoming the current New Orleans Pelicans.

Television rights in the United States belonged to ESPN. It was tipped by many to be one of the deepest and most hyped draft classes in recent years, with several players touted as future stars. College underclassmen that were highly touted by NBA scouts and executives included: Andrew Wiggins, Jabari Parker, Joel Embiid, Aaron Gordon, Julius Randle, Zach LaVine, T. J. Warren, and Gary Harris. Other highly sought after talents included Australian player Dante Exum and Croatian player Dario Šarić, who both declared for the draft, and Doug McDermott, who was automatically eligible as a graduating college senior.

Highlights from the draft included the first selections made by Adam Silver as commissioner and Mark Tatum as deputy commissioner, the second Canadian to be the first overall pick (Andrew Wiggins), the first pair of Canadian top 10 picks and second pair of Canadian lottery picks (Wiggins and Nik Stauskas), three top 20 Canadian selections (Wiggins, Stauskas, and Tyler Ennis), the first NBA Development League player to be selected in the first round (P. J. Hairston), the first time multiple NBA Development League players were selected in the same draft (Hairston and Thanasis Antetokounmpo), and the first Cape Verdean player to be selected in the draft (Walter Tavares). In addition, a standing ovation for Isaiah Austin occurred between the 15th and 16th picks of the draft, which included having the NBA itself hold a ceremonial pick to select him as a means of letting his dream of having his name be heard in the NBA draft come true, which happened days after he was diagnosed with Marfan syndrome and originally was never considered to play professional basketball again. Nearly two months after the draft ended, Andrew Wiggins was traded to the Minnesota Timberwolves as part of a three-team deal that brought Kevin Love to Cleveland; this resulted in the second time since the NBA–ABA merger that a first overall draft pick would not play a single game for the team that drafted him (the first time being the Orlando Magic drafted Chris Webber first overall in 1993 and then minutes later, traded Webber to the Golden State Warriors for Golden State's third overall pick in the 1993 Draft, Anfernee (Penny) Hardaway plus three of Golden State's future first-round draft selections).

2017 NBA All-Star Game

The 2017 NBA All-Star Game was an exhibition basketball game that was played on February 19, 2017 in New Orleans, Louisiana at the Smoothie King Center. It was the 66th edition of the event. The West won the game 192-182. The MVP of the game was Anthony Davis, who scored 52 points, the most ever scored by a player in an All-Star Game. It was initially planned to be held at Spectrum Center in Charlotte, home of the Charlotte Hornets. If the game had remained in Charlotte, it would have been the second time that Charlotte hosted the All-Star Game. The city previously hosted in 1991 at the now-demolished Charlotte Coliseum.On August 19, 2016, the NBA chose the Smoothie King Center in New Orleans, Louisiana, home of the New Orleans Pelicans, to host the All-Star Game after it was pulled from Charlotte because of the controversy surrounding North Carolina's "bathroom bill", commonly known as HB2. The 2017 All-Star Game became the first major sporting event in the United States to be relocated for political reasons since 1990. In that instance, the National Football League (NFL) relocated Super Bowl XXVII out of Tempe, Arizona, because the state did not recognize Martin Luther King Jr. Day. TNT and TBS televised the game.

2019 NBA All-Star Game

The 2019 NBA All-Star Game was the 68th edition of the exhibition basketball game played on February 17, 2019. This was the second time that the format was not East/West. The game was held at the Spectrum Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, home of the Charlotte Hornets. Charlotte was announced as host on May 24, 2017. This was the second time that Charlotte hosted the All-Star Game; the first time was in 1991, at the Hornets' previous home arena Charlotte Coliseum. The game was supposed to be played in Charlotte in 2017, but was moved to New Orleans because of controversy surrounding the Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act. The game was televised by TNT for the 17th straight year, and was also simulcast on TBS in some markets.

2021 NBA All-Star Game

The 2021 NBA All-Star Game will be an exhibition game played on February 14, 2021. It will be the 70th edition of the event. The game will be hosted by the Indiana Pacers at Bankers Life Fieldhouse. This will be the second time that Indianapolis will host the All-Star Game, The last time the game was played there was in 1985, at the Hoosier Dome. The game will be televised nationally by TNT for the 19th consecutive year.The announcement of the site selection was made December 13, 2017 at a press conference held by the Indiana Pacers. In attendance at the announcement was NBA commissioner Adam Silver, Pacers owner Herb Simon, Governor Eric Holcomb and Mayor Joe Hogsett. The team had submitted its bid for the game in grand fashion with then team president and NBA legend Larry Bird delivering the bid in an Indy car.The event had been in the planning stage for almost a year. Other events scheduled for that weekend include the:

Rising Stars Challenge on February 12

Skills Challenge, Three-Point Contest and Slam Dunk Contest on February 13Additional events including a celebrity game and practices open to the public will be held at the adjacent Indiana Convention Center. The City of Indianapolis hopes to see an 8-figure ($10,000,000) in economic impact surrounding the game.

Audie Norris

Audie James Norris (born December 18, 1960) is a retired American professional basketball player. He was a 6'9" (206 cm) 230 lb (104 kg) center.

Norris played for the NBA's Portland Trail Blazers from 1982 to 1985. Teammate Mychal Thompson, father of Klay Thompson, gave him the nickname "The Atomic Dog" because of his brutal dunks.

After retiring in 1994 from professional basketball, Norris has spent his time coaching and developing the skill of young student athletes. With more than 10 years as a consultant to European basketball teams, he has over 18 years of experience from coaching basketball on all levels from cadet level to semi-pro leagues. He is a certified F.E.B. Basketball Superior Coach and member of the Spanish Basketball Coaches Association, AEEB.

Norris has been named an NBA Ambassador by league commissioner Adam Silver, participating in the NBA Ambassador programs with Jr. NBA and NBA Cares.

His brother Sylvester Norris was also a player for the NBA's San Antonio Spurs.

Charles Oakley

Charles Oakley (born December 18, 1963) is an American former professional basketball player. Oakley was a member of the National Basketball Association's Chicago Bulls, New York Knicks, Toronto Raptors, Washington Wizards and Houston Rockets. A power forward, he consistently ranked as one of the best rebounders in the NBA. In 2017, he was confirmed to both play and coach the Killer 3's for the debut of the BIG3, a new basketball league focusing on 3-on-3 basketball.

Commissioner of the NBA

The Commissioner of the NBA is the chief executive of the National Basketball Association. The current commissioner is Adam Silver after he succeeded David Stern on February 1, 2014.

David Stern

David Joel Stern (born September 22, 1942) is an American businessman and lawyer who served as the fourth commissioner of the National Basketball Association. He started with the Association in 1966 as an outside counsel, joined the NBA in 1978 as General Counsel, and became the league's Executive Vice President in 1980. He became Commissioner in 1984, succeeding Larry O'Brien. He is credited with increasing the popularity of the NBA in the 1990s and 2000s.Stern has served on the Rutgers University Board of Overseers and is a Chair Emeritus of the Board of Trustees of Columbia University. He is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.On October 25, 2012, Stern announced that he would step down as NBA commissioner on February 1, 2014, 30 years to the day after beginning his tenure as commissioner. His deputy, Adam Silver, was his successor. At the time of his departure, he was the NBA's longest-serving commissioner. Stern received the Olympic Order in 2012. On February 14, 2014, the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame announced that Stern would be a member of its 2014 induction class. In 2016, he became a member of the FIBA Hall of Fame.

Doc Rivers

Glenn Anton "Doc" Rivers (born October 13, 1961) is an American basketball coach and former player who is the head coach for the Los Angeles Clippers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). As an NBA point guard, Rivers was known for his defense.

Eligibility for the NBA draft

The NBA draft is an annual event in which the 30 franchises in the National Basketball Association select new players for their teams. Eligibility rules for prospective players have changed several times during the history of the league. No player may sign with the NBA until they are 19 years or older. Players who have played at least one year of college basketball are eligible for the NBA draft; this has been colloquially called the one-and-done rule, with such players called "one-and-done players"

Howard Beck

Howard Beck (born July 6, 1968 in Oakland, California) is an American sports journalist. Described as "highly regarded" by USA Today, Beck has covered the National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Los Angeles Daily News, the New York Times and currently Bleacher Report.At the Los Angeles Daily News, Howard covered the Los Angeles Lakers. With the New York Times, Howard covered the New York Knicks for most of his tenure with a brief assignment to the Brooklyn Nets during their first season in Brooklyn. In the fall of 2013 Howard left the New York Times for the Bleacher Report to be their national NBA writer.Beginning in 2017, Howard created and hosts The Full 48 podcast. Guests have included NBA commissioner Adam Silver, Actor, Kelly Aucoin, LA Lakers owner Jeanie Buss, Counting Crows lead singer, Adam Duritz and others.[3]Howard was raised in California and graduated from the University of California, Davis where he served as editor in chief for the California Aggie newspaper. He currently resides in Brooklyn, New York.

Isaiah Austin

Isaiah Charles Austin (born October 25, 1993) is an American professional basketball player for Nanjing Monkey King of the Chinese Basketball Association (CBA). He played two years of college basketball for Baylor University. He had been considered a first-round prospect in the 2014 NBA draft until he was diagnosed with Marfan syndrome. In 2016, he was cleared to continue playing basketball after a two-year stint away from the game due to Marfan syndrome.

James L. Dolan

James Lawrence Dolan (born May 11, 1955) is an American businessman who serves as executive chairman and CEO of The Madison Square Garden Company and executive chairman of MSG Networks. As the companies' chairman, Dolan oversees all operations within the company and also supervises day-to-day operations of its professional sports teams, the New York Knicks, New York Rangers, and New York Liberty, as well as their regional sports networks, which include MSG Network and MSG Plus. Dolan previously served as CEO of Cablevision until its sale in June 2016.

Mark Tatum

Mark A. Tatum is an American sports and business executive who is currently serving as the incumbent Deputy Commissioner of the National Basketball Association under Adam Silver. Additionally, Tatum also currently holds the position of the NBA's chief operating officer. For his work in these capacities, Forbes has ranked him at No. 8 on its list of "Most Influential Minorities in Sports".

National Basketball Association

The National Basketball Association (NBA) is a men's professional basketball league in North America; composed of 30 teams (29 in the United States and 1 in Canada). It is widely considered to be the premier men's professional basketball league in the world. The NBA is an active member of USA Basketball (USAB), which is recognized by FIBA (also known as the International Basketball Federation) as the national governing body for basketball in the United States. The NBA is one of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. NBA players are the world's best paid athletes by average annual salary per player.The league was founded in New York City on June 6, 1946, as the Basketball Association of America (BAA). The league adopted the name National Basketball Association on August 3, 1949, after merging with the competing National Basketball League (NBL). The league's several international as well as individual team offices are directed out of its head offices located in the Olympic Tower at 645 Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan. NBA Entertainment and NBA TV studios are directed out of offices located in Secaucus, New Jersey.

Sports betting

Sports betting is the activity of predicting sports results and placing a wager on the outcome. The frequency of sports bet upon varies by culture, with the vast majority of bets being placed on association football, American football, basketball, baseball, hockey, track cycling, auto racing, mixed martial arts, and boxing at both the amateur and professional levels. Sports betting can also extend to non-athletic events, such as reality show contests and political elections, and non-human contests such as horse racing, greyhound racing, and illegal, underground dog fighting. It is not uncommon for sports betting websites to offer wagers for entertainment events such as the Grammys, the Oscars, and the Emmy Awards.

Sports bettors place their wagers either legally, through a bookmaker/sportsbook, or illegally through privately run enterprises. The term "book" is a reference to the books used by wagebrokers to track wagers, payouts, and debts. Many legal sportsbooks are found online, operated over the Internet from jurisdictions separate from the clients they serve, usually to get around various gambling laws (such as the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 in the United States) in select markets, such as Las Vegas, Nevada, or on gambling cruises through self-serve kiosks. They take bets "up-front", meaning the bettor must pay the sportsbook before placing the bet. Illegal bookies, due to the nature of their business, can operate anywhere but only require money from losing bettors and don't require the wagered money up front, creating the possibility of debt to the bookie from the bettor. This creates a number of other criminal elements, thus furthering their illegality.

Sports betting has resulted in a number of scandals in sport, affecting the integrity of sports events through various acts including point shaving (players affecting the score by missing shots), spot-fixing (a player action is fixed), bad calls from officials at key moments, and overall match fixing (the overall result of the event is fixed). Examples include the 1919 World Series, the alleged (and later admitted) illegal gambling of former MLB player Pete Rose, and former NBA referee Tim Donaghy. One of the biggest scandals of all involves the 2002 NBA Championship games. Tim Donaghy was allegedly gambling on the spreads for the games that he refereed. After his trial, Tim Donaghy went on to release a statement to the public saying how one of the most controversial games in NBA history, Game six of the 2002 NBA Western Conference finals, was rigged.

Steve Ballmer

Steven Anthony Ballmer (; born March 24, 1956) is an American businessman and investor who was the chief executive officer of Microsoft from January 13, 2000 to February 4, 2014, and is the current owner of the Los Angeles Clippers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). As of October 2018, his personal wealth is estimated at US$42.4 billion, ranking him the 18th richest person in the world.Ballmer was hired by Bill Gates at Microsoft in 1980 after dropping out of Stanford University. He eventually became President in 1998, and replaced Gates as CEO in 2000. On February 4, 2014, Ballmer retired as CEO and was succeeded by Satya Nadella; Ballmer resigned from the Board of Directors on August 19, 2014 to prepare for teaching a new class.On May 29, 2014, Ballmer placed a bid of $2 billion to purchase the NBA's Los Angeles Clippers after NBA commissioner Adam Silver forced Donald Sterling to sell the team. He became the Clippers owner on August 12, 2014; Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen was a fellow owner in the NBA, having owned the Portland Trail Blazers since 1988.

His time as Microsoft CEO was mixed, with the company tripling sales and doubling of profits, but losing its market dominance and missing out on 21st-century technology trends.

The 7 Adventures of Sinbad

The 7 Adventures of Sinbad (previously The 7 Voyages of Sinbad) is a 2010 American film directed by Adam Silver and Ben Hayflick. As a mockbuster distributed by The Asylum, it attempts to capitalise on Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time and Clash of the Titans.

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