AdSense

Google AdSense is a program run by Google that allows publishers in the Google Network of content sites to serve automatic text, image, video, or interactive media advertisements, that are targeted to site content and audience. These advertisements are administered, sorted, and maintained by Google. They can generate revenue on either a per-click or per-impression basis. Google beta-tested a cost-per-action service, but discontinued it in October 2008 in favor of a DoubleClick offering (also owned by Google).[2] In Q1 2014, Google earned US $3.4 billion ($13.6 billion annualized), or 22% of total revenue, through Google AdSense.[3] AdSense is a participant in the AdChoices program, so AdSense ads typically include the triangle-shaped AdChoices icon.[4][5] This program also operates on HTTP cookies. Over 11.1 million websites use AdSense. [6]

Google AdSense
AdSense Logo
Developer(s)Google
Initial releaseJune 18, 2003[1]
Operating systemCross-platform (web-based application)
TypeOnline advertising
Websitewww.google.com/adsense

Overview

Google uses its technology to serve advertisements based on website content, the user's geographical location, and other factors. Those wanting to advertise with Google's targeted advertisement system may enroll through Google AdWords. AdSense has become one of the popular programs that specializes in creating and placing banner advertisements on a website or blog, because the advertisements are less intrusive and the content of the advertisements is often relevant to the website. Many websites use AdSense to make revenue from their web content (website, online videos, online audio content, etc.), and it is the most popular advertising network.[7] AdSense has been particularly important for delivering advertising revenue to small websites that do not have the resources for developing advertising sales programs and salespeople to seek out advertisers. To display contextually relevant advertisements on a website, webmasters place a brief Javascript code on the website's pages. Websites that are content-rich have been very successful with this advertising program, as noted in a number of publisher case studies on the AdSense website. Google has removed the policy of limiting AdSense ads to three ads per page. Now, Adsense publishers can place unlimited amount of AdSense ads on a page.

Some webmasters put significant effort into maximizing their own AdSense income. They do this in three ways:

  1. They use a wide range of traffic-generating techniques, including but not limited to online advertising.
  2. They build content on their websites that attracts those AdSense advertisements that pay out the most when they are clicked.
  3. They use text content on their websites that encourages visitors to click on advertisements. Note that Google prohibits webmasters from using phrases like "Click on my AdSense ads" to increase click rates. The phrases accepted are "Sponsored Links" and "Advertisements".

The source of all AdSense income is the AdWords program, which in turn has a complex pricing model based on a Vickrey second price auction. AdSense commands an advertiser to submit a sealed bid (i.e., a bid not observable by competitors). Additionally, for any given click received, advertisers only pay one bid increment above the second-highest bid. Google currently shares 68% of revenue generated by AdSense with content network partners, and 51% of revenue generated by AdSense with AdSense for Search partners.[8] On June 18, 2015, Google announced rebranding of AdSense with a new logo.[9]

Adsense rebranded with a new logo
AdSense logo from 2015–2018

History

Google launched its AdSense program, originally named content targeting advertising in March 2003.[10] The AdSense name was originally used by Applied Semantics, a competitive offering to AdSense. The name was adopted by Google after Google acquired Applied Semantics in April 2003.[11] Some advertisers complained that AdSense yielded worse results than AdWords, since it served ads that related contextually to the content on a web page and that content was less likely to be related to a user's commercial desires than search results. For example, someone browsing a blog dedicated to flowers was less likely to be interested in ordering flowers than someone searching for terms related to flowers. As a result, in 2004 Google allowed its advertisers to opt out of the AdSense network.[12]

Paul Buchheit, the founder of Gmail, had the idea to run ads within Google's e-mail service. But he and others say it was Susan Wojcicki, with the backing of Sergey Brin, who organized the team that adapted that idea into an enormously successful product.[13] By early 2005 AdSense accounted for an estimated 15 percent of Google's total revenues.[12] In 2009, Google AdSense announced that it would now be offering new features, including the ability to "enable multiple networks to display ads". In February 2010, Google AdSense started using search history in contextual matching to offer more relevant ads.[14] On January 21, 2014, Google AdSense launched Direct Campaigns, a tool where publishers may directly sell ads. This feature was retired on February 10, 2015.

Types

Content

The content-based advertisements can be targeted for users with certain interest or contexts. The targeting can be CPC (cost per click) or CPM (cost per thousand impressions) based, the only significant difference in CPC and CPM is that with CPC targeting, earnings are based on clicks while CPM earnings recently are actually based not just per views/impression but on a larger scale, per thousand impression, therefore driving it from the market, which makes CPC ads more common.

There are various ad sizes available for content ads. The ads can be simple text, image, animated image, flash video, video, or rich media ads. At most ad sizes, users can change whether to show both text and multimedia ads or just one of them. As of November 2012, a grey arrow appears beneath AdSense text ads for easier identification. Google made a policy update regarding the number of ads per page, the three ads per page limit has been removed. [15]

Search

AdSense for search allows publisher to display ads relating to search terms on their site and receive 51% of the revenue generated from those ads.[8] AdSense custom search ads can be displayed either alongside the results from an AdSense Custom Search Engine or alongside internal search results through the use of Custom Search Ads. Custom Search Ads are only available to "white-listed" publishers. Although the revenue share from AdSense for Search (51%) is lower than from AdSense for Content (68%) higher returns can be achieved due to the potential for higher Click Through Rates.

Video

AdSense for video allows publishers with video content (e.g., video hosting websites) to generate revenue using ad placements from Google's extensive advertising network. The publisher is able to decide what type of ads are shown with their video inventory. Formats available include linear video ads (pre-roll or post-roll), overlay ads that display AdSense text and display ads over the video content, and the TrueView format.[16] Publishers can also display companion ads - display ads that run alongside video content outside the player. AdSense for video is for publishers running video content within a player and not for YouTube publishers.

Link units

Link units are closely targeted to the interests of your users. Because users directly interact with the ad unit, they may be more interested in the ads they eventually see.

AdSense publishers are paid for clicks on the ads that are linked from link unit topics, not for clicks on the initial topics themselves. The ads on the linked page are pay-per-click Google ads similar to those shown in regular AdSense ad units. Link Units

Discontinued types

Mobile content

AdSense for mobile content allowed publishers to generate earnings from their mobile websites using targeted Google advertisements. Just like AdSense for content, Google matches advertisements to the content of a website — in this case, a mobile website. Instead of traditional JavaScript code, technologies such as Java and Objective-C are used. As of February 2012, AdSense for Mobile Content was rolled into the core AdSense for Content offering to better reflect the lessening separation between desktop and mobile content.[17]

Domains

AdSense for domains allows advertisements to be placed on domain names that have not been developed. This offers domain name owners a way to monetize (make money from) domain names that are otherwise dormant or not in use. AdSense for domains is currently being offered to all AdSense publishers, but it wasn't always available to all. On December 12, 2008, TechCrunch reported that AdSense for Domains is available for all US publishers.[18] On February 22, 2012, Google announced that it was shutting down its Hosted AdSense for Domains program.[19]

Feeds

In May 2005, Google announced a limited-participation beta version of AdSense for Feeds, a version of AdSense that runs on RSS and Atom feeds that have more than 100 active subscribers. According to the Official Google Blog, "advertisers have their ads placed in the most appropriate feed articles; publishers are paid for their original content; readers see relevant advertising—and in the long run, more quality feeds to choose from."[20] AdSense for Feeds works by inserting images into a feed. When the image is displayed by a RSS reader or Web browser, Google writes the advertising content into the image that it returns. The advertisement content is chosen based on the content of the feed surrounding the image. When the user clicks the image, he or she is redirected to the advertiser's website in the same way as regular AdSense advertisements. AdSense for Feeds remained in its beta state until August 15, 2008, when it became available to all AdSense users. On December 3, 2012, Google discontinued AdSense For Feeds program.[21]

How it works

  • The webmaster who wishes to participate in AdSense inserts the AdSense JavaScript code into a webpage.
  • Each time this page is visited by an end user (e.g., a person surfing the Internet), the JavaScript code uses inlined JSON to display content fetched from Google's servers.
  • For contextual advertisements, Google's servers use a web cache of the page created by its Mediabot "crawler" to determine a set of high-value keywords. If keywords have been cached already, advertisements are served for those keywords based on the AdWords bidding system. (More details are described in the AdSense patent.)
  • For website-targeted advertisements, the advertiser chooses the page(s) on which to display advertisements, and pays based on cost per mille (CPM), or the price advertisers choose to pay for every thousand advertisements displayed.[22][23]
  • For referrals, Google adds money to the advertiser's account when visitors either download the referred software or subscribe to the referred service.[24] The referral program was retired in August 2008.[25]
  • Search advertisements are added to the list of results after the visitor/user performs a search.
  • Because the JavaScript is sent to the Web browser when the page is requested, it is possible for other website owners to copy the JavaScript code into their own webpages. To protect against this type of fraud, AdSense publishers can specify the pages on which advertisements should be shown. AdSense then ignores clicks from pages other than those specified. (see Click fraud for more information).

Reception

Some webmasters create websites tailored to lure searchers from Google and other engines onto their AdSense website to make money from clicks. Such websites often contain nothing but a large amount of interconnected, automated content (e.g., a directory with content from the Open Directory Project, or "scraper" websites relying on RSS feeds for content). Possibly the most popular form of such "AdSense farms" are splogs (spam blogs), which are poorly written content centered around known high-paying keywords. Many of these websites reuse content from other websites, such as Wikipedia, to attract visitors. These and related approaches are considered to be search engine spam and can be reported to Google.[26] A Made for AdSense (MFA) website or webpage has little or no content, but is filled with advertisements so that users have no choice but to click on advertisements. Such pages were tolerated in the past, but due to complaints, Google now disables such accounts. There have also been reports of Trojan horses engineered to produce counterfeit Google advertisements that are formatted looking like legitimate ones. The Trojan uploads itself onto an unsuspecting user's computer through a webpage and then replaces the original advertisements with its own set of malicious advertisements.[27]

In May 2014, Hagens Berman law firm filed a national class-action lawsuit against Google, claiming the company unlawfully denies payments to thousands of website owners and operators who place ads on their sites sold through Google AdWords.[28]

There were numerous complaints in online discussion forums about a difference in treatment for publishers from China and India, namely that sites from those locations are required to be active for six months before being eligible for AdSense.[29][30][31] Due to alleged concerns about click fraud, Google AdSense has been criticized by some search engine optimization firms as a large source of what Google calls "invalid clicks", in which one company clicks on a rival's search engine advertisements to drive up the other company's costs.[32] The payment terms for webmasters have also been criticized. Google withholds payment until an account reaches US$100,[33]

Google came under fire when the official Google AdSense Blog showcased the French video website Imineo.com. This website violated Google's AdSense Program Policies[34] by displaying AdSense alongside sexually explicit material. Typically, websites displaying AdSense have been banned from showing such content.[35] Using both AdSense and AdWords may cause a website to pay Google a commission when the website advertises itself.[36] In some cases, AdSense displays inappropriate or offensive ads. For example, in a news story about a terrorist attack in India, an advert was generated for a (presumably non-existent) educational qualification in terrorism.[37] AdSense uses tracking cookies that are viewed by some users as a threat to privacy.[38] AdSense terms of service require that sites using AdSense explain the use of these cookies in their privacy policy.[39]

See also

References

  1. ^ Google Expands Advertising Monetization Program for Websites, June 18, 2004, Press Release, Google
  2. ^ "DoubleClick by Google - Better digital advertising".
  3. ^ "Google Announces First Quarter 2014 Results". Google. Retrieved July 9, 2014.
  4. ^ "About Google Ads". Retrieved January 20, 2015.
  5. ^ Parker, Pamela (March 22, 2011). "Goodbye "Ads By Google" & Hello "AdChoices" As Google's Backs Industry Label Effort". Search Engine Land. Retrieved January 20, 2015.
  6. ^ "Websites using Google AdSense". Retrieved 27 November 2018.
  7. ^ "Usage of advertising networks for websites". W3Techs. 2012-08-25.
  8. ^ a b "Google Form 10-Q, Q2 2010". 2010-07-15. Archived from the original on 30 September 2010. Retrieved 2010-09-08.
  9. ^ Adsense rebrands with new logo, Preview Tech, June 19, 2015.
  10. ^ Matt, Cutts. "Google Guy". Web Master World. Archived from the original on 2014-03-04.
  11. ^ "Google Acquires Applied Semantics". News from Google. April 23, 2003. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  12. ^ a b Battelle, John (2005). The Search. New York: Penguin. pp. 151–2. ISBN 978-1-85788-361-9.
  13. ^ Swift, Mike (February 7, 2011). "Susan Wojcicki: The most important Googler you've never heard of". San Jose Mercury News. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  14. ^ Pepitone, Julianne (2011-02-12). "Google expands ad targeting methods". CNNMoney.com. Retrieved 2012-07-26.
  15. ^ "Adsense ads per page limt lifted". Bestparttimejob.in. Retrieved 23 August 2016.
  16. ^ "AdSense for video overview - AdSense Help".
  17. ^ "Inside AdSense: Mobile becomes a core component of AdSense". Inside AdSense. Retrieved 13 October 2014.
  18. ^ AdSense For Domains Now Available For All US Publishers, Robin Wauters, Dec 12, 2008, TechCrunch
  19. ^ Google kills “hosted” Adsense for Domains program , Andrew Allemann, February 22, 2012, Domain Name Wire
  20. ^ Shuman Ghosemajumder (2005-05-17). "Official Google Blog: Feed me". Retrieved 2007-12-29.
  21. ^ Tony John. "AdSense For Feeds going away". Techulator.com. Retrieved 13 October 2014.
  22. ^ "Google AdSense Help Center: What are CPM ads?". 2007-12-29.
  23. ^ "Google AdWords: All About Site-Targeted Ads". 2007-12-29.
  24. ^ "Google AdSense Help Center: What is the referrals feature?". 2007-12-29.
  25. ^ "Google yanks AdSense referral program, offers shoddy surrogate". blog.anta.net. 2008-07-01. ISSN 1797-1993. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved 2008-07-01.
  26. ^ "Google Webmaster Guidelines". Retrieved 2012-02-02. If you believe that another site is abusing Google's quality guidelines, please report that site at https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/spamreport.
  27. ^ Benaifer Jah (2005-12-27). "Trojan Horse program that targets Google AdSense ads". TechShout.
  28. ^ "Google Adsense Class Action Lawsuit". hbsslaw.com. Retrieved 1 January 2016.
  29. ^ "Eligibility to participate in AdSense". Retrieved 7 December 2011. (Google policy)
  30. ^ Discussion forum example: complaint about treatment India vs. Pakistan, 2009
  31. ^ Mahesh Jawahar (20 February 2012). "Google Adsense and its adventure in India: The real story of Google adsense scam in India!!". (blog blames Indians for their click fraud scams, does not blame Google)
  32. ^ Charles C. Mann (January 2006). "How click fraud could swallow the internet". Wired.
  33. ^ "When do I get paid?". Google AdSense Help Center.
  34. ^ "11 Google Adsense Program Policy Rules(Every Publisher Must See)". www.codiblog.com.
  35. ^ "Adult content". Google AdSense Help Center.
  36. ^ "BE CAREFUL when using both AdSense + AdWords by Google". 2009-02-19.
  37. ^ "Google's Worst Ads Ever (GOOG)". 2009-08-20.
  38. ^ "Privacy Concerns adsense". Allaboutcookies.org. Retrieved 13 October 2014.
  39. ^ "Google AdSense terms". Google.com. Retrieved 13 October 2014.

External links

AdMob

AdMob is a mobile advertising company founded by Omar Hamoui. The name AdMob is a portmanteau for "advertising on mobile". It was incorporated on April 10, 2006 while Hamoui was in business school at Wharton. The company is based in Mountain View, California. In November 2009 it was acquired by Google for $750 million. The acquisition was completed on May 27, 2010. Apple Inc. had also expressed interest in purchasing the company the same year, but they were out-bid by Google. Prior to being acquired by Google, AdMob acquired the company AdWhirl, formerly Adrollo, which is a platform for developing advertisements in iPhone applications. AdMob offers advertising solutions for many mobile platforms, including Android, iOS, webOS, Flash Lite, Windows Phone and all standard mobile web browsers.AdMob is one of the world's largest mobile advertising platforms and claims to serve more than 40 billion mobile banner and text ads per month across mobile Web sites and handset applications.On May 16, 2013 Google announced a rebuild of the AdMob platform at their 2013 I/O using technology from their other platforms like AdSense with the goal of helping app developers to build their business.

Contextual advertising

Contextual advertising is a form of targeted advertising for advertisements appearing on websites or other media, such as content displayed in mobile browsers. The advertisements themselves are selected and served by automated systems based on the identity of the user and the content displayed.

Criticism of Google

Criticism of Google includes concern for tax avoidance, misuse and manipulation of search results, its use of others' intellectual property, concerns that its compilation of data may violate people's privacy and collaboration with Google Earth by the military to spy on us , censorship of search results and content, and the energy consumption of its servers as well as concerns over traditional business issues such as monopoly, restraint of trade, antitrust, "idea borrowing", and being an "Ideological Echo Chamber".

Alphabet Inc. is an American multinational public corporation invested in Internet search, cloud computing, and advertising technologies. Google hosts and develops a number of Internet-based services and products, and generates profit primarily from advertising through its AdWords program.Google's stated mission is "to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful"; this mission, and the means used to accomplish it, have raised concerns among the company's critics. Much of the criticism pertains to issues that have not yet been addressed by cyber law.

CyberThrill

CyberThrill is one of the first and now-defunct online casinos, which gained it notoriety for one of the largest organised international sponsorship (and gambling) frauds, through its ad serving program. Formed in 1997 and located in Nassau, Bahamas, the company was represented by the Canadian firm Internet Entertainment Enterprises, Inc. (based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada) which also handled the casino's marketing and banner advertising program. The online casino was eventually taken offline some time in late 2000-early 2001 by disgruntled webmasters who had fallen victim to the scam. The former location of cyberThrill was CyberThrill.com, which is today an Ad driven parked domain.

FeedBurner

FeedBurner is a web feed management provider launched in 2004. It provides custom RSS feeds and management tools for bloggers, podcasters, and other web-based content publishers. Google acquired FeedBurner in 2007.

FeedBurner was founded by Dick Costolo, Eric Lunt, Steve Olechowski, and Matt Shobe. The four founders were consultants together at Andersen Consulting (now Accenture). Costolo went on to serve as chief executive officer of Twitter from 2010 to 2015.

Google Ad Manager

Google Ad Manager is an online advertisement service brand introduced by Google in June 27, 2018. It consists of two former services, including DoubleClick for Publishers (formerly known as DART for Publishers) and DoubleClick Ad Exchange. It can be used as an ad server but it also provides a variety of features for managing the sales process of online ads using a publisher's dedicated sales team. Should a publisher not sell out all their available ad inventory, it can choose to run either other ad networks or AdSense ads as remnant inventory in Google Ad Manager.

Google Contributor

Google Contributor is a program run by Google that allows users in the Google Network of content sites to view the websites without any advertisements that are administered, sorted, and maintained by Google.

The program started with prominent websites, like The Onion and Mashable among others, to test this service. After November 2015, the program opened up to any publisher who displayed ads on their websites through Google AdSense without requiring any sign-on from publishers.

After November 2015, the program was available for everyone in the United States. Google Contributor stopped accepting new registrations after December 2016 in preparation for a new version launch in early 2017. On January 17, Google Contributor was shut down, with the landing page stating "We're launching a new and improved Contributor in early 2017!"In June 2017, the new Google Contributor was launched.

Google Developers

Google Developers (previously Google Code) is Google's site for software development tools, application programming interfaces (APIs), and technical resources. The site contains documentation on using Google developer tools and APIs—including discussion groups and blogs for developers using Google's developer products.

There are APIs offered for almost all of Google's popular consumer products, like Google Maps, YouTube, Google Apps, and others.

The site also features a variety of developer products and tools built specifically for developers. Google App Engine is a hosting service for web apps. Project Hosting gives users version control for open source code. Google Web Toolkit (GWT) allows developers to create Ajax applications in the Java programming language.

The site contains reference information for community based developer products that Google is involved with like Android from the Open Handset Alliance and OpenSocial from the OpenSocial Foundation.

IWeb

iWeb is a template-based WYSIWYG website creation tool developed by Apple Inc. The first version of iWeb was announced at the Macworld Conference & Expo on January 10, 2006 as part of the iLife ’06 suite of digital lifestyle applications. iWeb '11 was released on October 20, 2010 as part of the iLife ’11 suite, though it was not updated from the previous release (version 3.0.2).iWeb allowed users to create websites and blogs and customize them with their own text, photos, and movies. Users could then publish their websites to MobileMe or another hosting service via FTP. In addition to its ability to publish to MobileMe, iWeb integrated with other services, including Facebook, YouTube, AdSense and Google Maps. Apple ceased development of iWeb in 2011.

Iranian.com

Iranian.com is a website that hosts blogs, news, and commentaries by and for the Iranian diaspora. Founder Jahanshah Javid started the website because journalists and the media are assiduously censored in Iran.

When Javid started the website in 1995, he called it The Iranian (after The New Yorker).The site has historically generated revenues through donations, Google AdSense, advertisers and sponsors like World Singles Networks.On April 24, 2012, Javid announced that he was pursuing a new venture, and that he had sold his remaining shares to his partner, entrepreneur Saïd Amin.

Joel Comm

Joel Comm (born May 5, 1964) is an American author and Internet marketer. Comm is the CEO of InfoMedia, a social media consulting company.

After a career as a radio personality, Comm started generating revenue from his Internet business ventures. In 1995, he created WorldVillage, a virtual village that offers games and trivia competitions. He created DealofDay.com, WorldVillage's sister website, as a directory of hundreds of retailers' discounts. Comm founded ClassicGames, a family-friendly multiplayer gaming website he sold to Yahoo! in 1997 and was the precursor for Yahoo! Games.

In 2006, Comm authored The AdSense Code, a book about how to maximize revenue through Google's AdSense. The book that year reached The New York Times Best Seller list and the Bloomberg Businessweek bestseller list. Comm also authored Twitter Power, a book that describes how to create a Twitter account, gain a large following, and market products on Twitter.

In 2007, Comm conceived of and hosted The Next Internet Millionaire, the first Internet reality show. Based on the NBC show The Apprentice, it offered contestants the chance to win $25,000 and join one of Comm's business ventures with the goal of making $1 million. In 2008, Comm created iFart Mobile, an app that makes fart noises. 14 days after he published the app, it had been bought 100,000 times and was ranked first on Apple Inc.'s App Store.

List of Google apps for Android

e Google Play Store, although some may not show up in search results if they are listed as incompatible with your device (even though they may still function from an *.apk). Some of Google's apps may be pre-installed on some devices, depending upon the device manufacturer and the version of Android. A few of these apps, such as Gboard, are not supported on older versions of Android.

List of multi-channel networks

This is a list of notable multi-channel networks. Multi-channel networks are organizations that work with video platforms such as YouTube to offer assistance in areas such as "product, programming, funding, cross-promotion, partner management, digital rights management, monetization/sales, and/or audience development", usually in exchange for a percentage of the AdSense revenue from the channel.They are also known as Online Video Studios, MCNs, OVSs, YouTube Networks or simply Networks.

Mediabot

Mediabot is the web crawler that Google uses for analysing the content so Google AdSense can serve contextually relevant advertising to a web page. Mediabot identifies itself with the user agent string "Mediapartners-Google/2.1".

Unlike other crawlers, Mediabot does not follow links to discover new crawlable URLs, instead only visiting URLs that have included the AdSense code. Where that content resides behind a login, the crawler can be given a login so that it is able to crawl protected content.Mediabot will usually first visit a page within seconds of AdSense code first being called from that page. Thereafter it revisits pages on a regular but unpredictable basis. Changes made to a page therefore do not immediately cause changes to the ads displayed on the page.

Ads can still be shown on a page even if the Mediabot has not yet visited it. In this instance ads chosen will be based on a combination of the overall domain theme and keywords appearing in the URL string. If no ads can be matched to the page, either public service ads, blank space, or a solid color are shown, depending on the settings for that ad unit.

Paul Buchheit

Paul T. Buchheit is an American computer engineer and entrepreneur. He was the creator and lead developer of Gmail. He developed the original prototype of Google AdSense as part of his work on Gmail. He also suggested Google's former company motto "Don't be evil" in a 2000 meeting on company values. That motto was initially coined in 1999 by engineer Amit Patel.

Scraper site

A scraper site is a website that copies content from other websites using web scraping. The content is then mirrored with the goal of creating revenue, usually through advertising and sometimes by selling user data. Scraper sites come in various forms. Some provide little, if any material or information, and are intended to obtain user information such as e-mail addresses, to be targeted for spam e-mail. Price aggregation and shopping sites access multiple listings of a product and allow a user to rapidly compare the prices.

Spam blog

A spam blog, also known as an auto blog or the neologism splog, is a blog which the author uses to promote affiliated websites, to increase the search engine rankings of associated sites or to simply sell links/ads.

The purpose of a splog can be to increase the PageRank or backlink portfolio of affiliate websites, to artificially inflate paid ad impressions from visitors (see made for AdSense or MFA-blogs), and/or use the blog as a link outlet to sell links or get new sites indexed. Spam blogs are usually a type of scraper site, where content is often either inauthentic text or merely stolen (see blog scraping) from other websites. These blogs usually contain a high number of links to sites associated with the splog creator which are often disreputable or otherwise useless websites.

There is frequent confusion between the terms "splog" and "spam in blogs". Splogs are blogs where the articles are fake, and are only created for search engine spamming. To spam in blogs, conversely, is to include random comments on the blogs of innocent bystanders, in which spammers take advantage of a site's ability to allow visitors to post comments that may include links. In fact, one of the earliest uses of the term "splog" referred to the latter.This is used often in conjunction with other spamming techniques, including spings.

Traffic exchange

A traffic exchange is a type of website which provides a service for webmasters in exchange for traffic. It is similar to the autosurf concept with the exception that traffic exchanges usually use a manual rotation.

Web widget

A web widget is a web page or web application that is embedded as an element of a host web page but which is substantially independent of the host page, having limited or no interaction with the host. A web widget commonly provides users of the host page access to resources from another web site, content that the host page may be prevented from accessing itself by the browser's same-origin policy or the content provider's CORS policy. That content includes advertising (Google's AdSense), sponsored external links (Taboola), user comments (Disqus), social media buttons (Twitter), Facebook), news (USA Today), and weather (AccuWeather). Some web widgets though serve as user-selectable customizations of the host page itself (My Yahoo!).

Overview
Advertising
Communication
Software
Platforms
Hardware
Development
tools
Publishing
Search
(timeline)
Events
People
Other
Related
Subsidiaries
People

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.