Academy of Television Arts & Sciences

The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS), also colloquially known as the Television Academy, is a professional honorary organization dedicated to the advancement of the television industry in the United States.

Founded in 1946, the organization presents the Primetime Emmy Awards, an annual ceremony honoring achievement in U.S. primetime television.

Academy of Television Arts & Sciences
Television Academy - 2018
Founded1946
Location
Area served
Television industry
ProductEmmy Awards
Key people
Frank Scherma
(Chairman and CEO)
Websitetelevisionacademy.com

History

Syd Cassyd considered television a tool for education and envisioned an organization that would put outside the "flash and glamor" of the industry and become an outlet for "serious discussion" and award the industries "finest achievements".[1] In 2016, producer Hayma Washington was elected chairman and CEO of the Academy of Arts and Sciences, becoming the first African-American to hold the position.[2]

In 2014, alongside its Hall of Fame induction ceremony and announced plans to expand its headquarters, the organization announced that it had changed its public brand to the Television Academy, with a new logo designed by Siegel + Gale. The new branding was intended to downplay the organization's antiquated formal name in favor of a more straightforward identity, and features a separating line (typically used to separate the organization's wordmark from a simplified image of the Emmy Award statuette) used to symbolize a screen, and also portrayed as a "portal".[3][4]

Emmy Award

The courtyard -- Academy of Television Arts & Sciences
The courtyard and Emmy Award statue at the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences facility on Lankershim

In 1949, the Television Academy held the first Emmy Awards ceremony, an annual event created to recognize excellence in U.S. television programming, although the initial event was restricted to programming from the Los Angeles area. The name "Emmy" was derived from "Immy," a nickname for the image orthicon camera tube, which aided the progress of modern television. The word was feminized as "Emmy" to match the statuette, which depicted a winged woman holding an atom.

The Emmy Awards are administered by three sister organizations who focus on various sectors of television programming: the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (primetime), the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (daytime, sports, news and documentary), and the International Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (international).

Publications and programs

In addition to recognizing outstanding programming through its Primetime Emmy Awards, the Television Academy publishes the award-winning emmy magazine and through the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Foundation, is responsible for the Archive of American Television, annual College Television Awards, Fred Rogers Memorial Scholarship, acclaimed student internships and other educational outreach programs.

Current governance

  • Hayma Washington[5] (Chairman & Chief Executive Officer)
  • Steve Venezia, CAS (Vice Chair)
  • Tim Gibbons (Second Vice Chair)
  • Sharon Lieblein, CSA (Secretary)
  • Allison Binder (Treasurer)
  • Mitch Waldow (Los Angeles Area Vice Chair)
  • Bob Bergen (Governors' Appointee)
  • Rickey Minor (Governors' Appointee)
  • Muchael Ruscio, ACE (Governors' Appointee)
  • Lori H. Schwartz (Governors' Appointee)
  • Madeline Di Nonno (Chair, Television Academy Foundation)[6]

Board of Governors

Animation
Janet Dimon
Jill Daniels
Art Directors/Set Decorators
James Pearse Connelly
Barbara Cassel
Casting Directors
Howard Meltzer, CSA
Peter Golden, CSA
Children's Programming
Daniel O. Evans
Ted Biaselli, Jr.
Cinematographers
Gary Baum
Lowell Peterson, ASC
Commercials
Ann Leslie Uzdavinis
Brian O'Rouke
Costume Design & Supervision
Sue Bub
Terry Ann Gordon
Daytime Programming
Eva Basler Demirjian
Steven Kent
Directors
Mark Cendrowski
Gail Mancuso
Documentary Programming
Lois Vossen
Shari Cookson
Electronic Production
John O'Brien
Kieran Healy
Interactive Media
Marc Johnson
Seth Shapiro
Los Angeles Area
Paul Button
Beatriz Gomez
Makeup/Hairstylists
Monte C. Haught
Terri D. Carter
Motion & Title Design
Ellen Kahn
Lynda Kahn
Music
Rickey Minor
Michael A. Levine
Performers
Patrika Darbo
Lily Tomlin
Picture Editors
Michael Ruscio, ACE
Stuart Bass, ACE
Producers
Tim Gibbons
Hayma Washington
Production Executives
Tammy Glover
Tony Carey
Professional Representatives
Elizabeth York
Janet Carol Norton
Public Relations
Nicole Marostica
Tammy Golihew
Reality Programming
Bob Boden
Philip D. Segal
Sound
Steve Venezia, CAS
Frank Morrone, CAS
Sound Editors
Eileen Horta
Edward Fassl
Special Visual Effects
Erik Henry
Mark Scott Spatny
Stunts
Thom Williams
Dorenda Moore
Television Executives
Tana Nugent Jamieson
Sam Linsky
Writers
Regina Y. Hicks
Terence Winter

[7]

Television Academy honors

See footnote.[8]

The Television Academy Honors were established in 2008 to recognize "Television with a Conscience"—television programming that inspires, informs, motivates and even has the power to change lives.

1st Annual (2008)

2nd Annual (2009)

  • Home Improvement, "A Home for the Holidays" (10th Annual)
  • Breaking the Huddle: The Integration of College Football
  • Brothers & Sisters, "Prior Commitments"
  • Extreme Makeover Home Edition, "The Martirez & Malek Families"
  • Masterpiece Contemporary: "God on Trial"
  • Stand Up to Cancer
  • 30 Days
  • Whale Wars

3rd Annual (2010)

4th Annual (2011)

  • The 16th Man
  • The Big C, "Taking The Plunge"
  • Friday Night Lights, "I Can't"
  • Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution
  • The Oprah Winfrey Show, "A Two-Day Oprah Show Event: 200 Adult Men Who Were Molested Come Forward"
  • Parenthood, "Pilot"
  • Private Practice, "Did You Hear What Happened to Charlotte King?"
  • Wartorn 1861–2010

5th Annual (2012)

6th Annual (2013)

7th Annual (2014)

  • The Big C: Hereafter
  • Comedy Warriors
  • The Fosters
  • Mea Maxima Culpa
  • Mom
  • Screw You Cancer
  • Vice

8th Annual (2015)

9th Annual (2016)

10th Annual (2017)

11th Annual (2018)

Hall of Fame

Note: There were no inductions in 1994, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2009.

1st (1984)

2nd (1985)

3rd (1986)

4th (1987)

5th (1988)

6th (1989)

7th (1990)

8th (1991)

9th (1992)

10th (1993)

11th (1995)

12th (1996)

13th (1997)

14th (1999)

15th (2002)

16th (2004)

17th (2006)

18th (2008)

19th (2010)

20th (2011)

21st (2012)

22nd (2013)

The 22nd Hall of Fame induction ceremony was held March 11, 2013, at the Beverly Hilton Hotel with presenters included Will Arnett of Arrested Development, sports icon John Madden and more stars.[9]

23rd (2014)

24th (2017)

See also

References

  1. ^ "History". Television Academy. Retrieved January 16, 2017.
  2. ^ "NAACP | NAACP Statement on Election of Hayma Washington to Television Academy". NAACP. November 21, 2016. Retrieved January 16, 2017.
  3. ^ "How the Television Academy got its brand mojo back". Fast Co Design. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  4. ^ "Television Academy getting $40 million makeover". Deadline.com. Retrieved July 10, 2014.
  5. ^ "Academy Elects Frank Scherma as Chairman and CEO". emmys.com. Retrieved January 10, 2019.
  6. ^ "Executive Committee". emmys.com. Retrieved January 10, 2019.
  7. ^ "Executive Committee". emmys.com.
  8. ^ "Television Academy Honors". Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Retrieved 2017-03-30.
  9. ^ "Big Bang Theory star Kaley Cuoco hosted the 22nd Hall of Fame Gala". emmys.com. February 25, 2013.

External links

Emmy Award

An Emmy Award, or simply Emmy, is an American award that recognizes excellence in the television industry, and is the equivalent of an Academy Award (for film), the Tony Award (for theater), and the Grammy Award (for music).Because Emmys are given in various sectors of the American television industry, they are presented in different annual ceremonies held throughout the year. The two events that receive the most media coverage are the Primetime Emmy Awards and the Daytime Emmy Awards, which recognize outstanding work in American primetime and daytime entertainment programming, respectively. Other notable Emmy Award ceremonies are those honoring national sports programming, national news and documentary shows, national business and financial reporting, and technological and engineering achievements in television, including the Primetime Engineering Emmy Awards. Regional Emmy Awards are also presented throughout the country at various times through the year, recognizing excellence in local and statewide television. In addition, International Emmys are awarded for excellence in TV programming produced and initially aired outside the United States.

Three related but separate organizations present the Emmy Awards: the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS), the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS), and the International Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (IATAS). Each is responsible for administering a particular set of Emmy ceremonies.

International Academy of Television Arts and Sciences

The International Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (IATAS) is an American organisation founded in 1969 to promote excellence in international television and is the organization that awards international Emmys to the best television programs produced outside the United States.Every November, The International Academy produces the International EMMY World Television Festival and International Emmy Awards Gala in New York City. The Festival screens the current year's International Emmy nominated programs with producers and directors in attendance.

International Emmy Award

The International Emmy Award is an award bestowed by the International Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (IATAS) in recognition to the best television programs initially produced and aired outside the United States. The awards are presented at the International Emmy Awards Gala, held annually in November in New York City. It attracts over 1,200 television professionals. The first International Emmys ceremony was held in 1973.

National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences

The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS) was created in 1955 to advance the arts and sciences of television. Headquartered in New York, NATAS's membership is national and the organization has local chapters around the country. It was also known as the National Television Academy until 2007.

Primetime Emmy Award

The Primetime Emmy Award is an American award bestowed by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS) in recognition of excellence in American primetime television programming. First given out in 1949, the award was originally referred to as simply the "Emmy Awards" until the first Daytime Emmy Award ceremony was held in 1974 and the word "prime time" was added to distinguish between the two.

The Primetime Emmy Awards generally air in mid-September, on the Sunday before the official start of the fall television season. They are currently seen in rotation among the four major networks (ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox). The ceremony is typically moved to late-August if it is broadcast by NBC (such as in 2006, 2010, and 2014), so that it does not conflict with NBC's commitment to broadcasting Sunday-night NFL games (due to another conflict, this time with the MTV Video Music Awards, the 2014 ceremony was also shifted to a Monday). However, the 2018 ceremony, to be broadcast by NBC, was moved back to September and aired on a Monday.

They are considered television's equivalent to the Academy Awards (film), Grammy Awards (music), and Tony Awards (theater). The awards are divided into three categories: Primetime Emmy Awards, Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards, and Primetime Engineering Emmy Awards.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Cinematography for a Limited Series or Movie

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Cinematography for a Limited Series or Movie is an annual award presented as part of the Primetime Emmy Awards.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Cinematography for a Single-Camera Series (One Hour)

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Cinematography for a Single-Camera Series (One Hour) is an annual award presented as part of the Primetime Emmy Awards. From 1971 until 2008, all single-camera series competed together in a combined category. Awards for one-hour and half-hour series were divided in 2008 and the category ran until 2010. From 2011 to 2016, the awards were again combined for all single-camera series. They were redivided in 2017.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series is an annual award given to the best television comedy series of the year. From 1960 to 1964, this category was combined with the Comedy Specials (one time programs) category so that both type of programs competed for the same award during those years.

The Flintstones and Family Guy are the only animated series to be nominated for the award.

Outside the Big Three networks (ABC, CBS and NBC), Fox has won this award twice, with Ally McBeal and Arrested Development, cable network HBO has won this award four times, one with Sex and the City and three times with Veep and streaming service Amazon Video once for The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special

This is a list of the winners and nominees of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series is an award presented annually by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS). It is given in honor of an actor who has delivered an outstanding performance in a guest starring role on a television drama series for the primetime network season.

The award was first presented at the 27th Primetime Emmy Awards on May 19, 1975 to Patrick McGoohan for his performance on Columbo: By Dawn's Early Light. It has undergone several name changes, originally honoring leading and supporting actors in single appearances on drama and comedy series through 1978. The award was reintroduced at the 38th Primetime Emmy Awards under the name Outstanding Guest Performer in a Drama Series, honoring actors and actresses in guest starring roles on television drama series. In 1989, the category was split into categories for each gender, resulting in the name change to its current title.

Since its inception, the award has been given to 35 actors. Ron Cephas Jones is the current recipient of the award for his role of William H. Hill on This Is Us. Charles S. Dutton, John Lithgow and Patrick McGoohan have won the most awards in this category with two each. Michael J. Fox have been nominated for the award on seven occasions, the most within the category.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series is an award presented annually by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS). It is given in honor of an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance in a guest starring role on a television drama series for the primetime network season.

The award was first presented at the 27th Primetime Emmy Awards on May 19, 1975 to Zohra Lampert for her performance on Kojak and Cloris Leachman for her role on The Mary Tyler Moore Show. It has undergone several name changes, originally honoring single leading and supporting appearances in drama and comedy series through 1978. The award was reintroduced at the 38th Primetime Emmy Awards under the name Outstanding Guest Performer in a Drama Series, honoring actors and actresses in guest starring roles on television drama series. In 1989, the category was split into categories for each gender, resulting in the name change to its current title.

Since its inception, the award has been given to 34 actresses. Samira Wiley is the current recipient of the award for her portrayal of Moira on The Handmaid's Tale. Margo Martindale, Patricia Clarkson, Shirley Knight, Amanda Plummer, and Alfre Woodard have won the most awards in this category with two each. Martindale and Woodard have been nominated for the award on four occasions, the most within the category. Meanwhile, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit holds the most awardees with 5 winners coming from the show.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series is an award presented annually by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS). It is given in honor of an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance in a leading role on a television drama series for the primetime network season.

The award was first presented at the 6th Primetime Emmy Awards on February 11, 1954. The acting awards presented during the inaugural years were not genre specific, with actresses in either drama or comedy series receiving nominations and awards. While Eve Arden was the first winner in the female acting category, Loretta Young was the first actress to win for a lead performance in a drama series. By 1966, the acting awards were split into drama and comedy categories, undergoing several name changes until settling with the current title.

Since its inception, the award has been given to 36 actresses, with 31 winning for performances in a drama series. At four awards, Tyne Daly and Michael Learned hold the record for most wins in the category. Angela Lansbury is the most nominated actress in the category with twelve nominations, though she has never won the award. Claire Foy is the current recipient of the award for her work on The Crown.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie is an award presented annually by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS). It is given in honor of an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance in a leading role on a television limited series or television movie for the primetime network season.

The award was first presented at the 7th Primetime Emmy Awards on March 7, 1955 to Judith Anderson for her performance as Lady Macbeth on the Hallmark Hall of Fame episode "Macbeth". It has undergone several name changes, with the category split into two categories at the 25th Primetime Emmy Awards—Outstanding Lead Actress in a Special Program – Drama or Comedy and Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series. By the 31st Primetime Emmy Awards, the categories were merged into one, and has since undergone several name changes, leading to its current title.

Since its inception, the award has been given to 54 actresses. Regina King is the current recipient of the award for her portrayal of Latrice Butler on Seven Seconds. Helen Mirren has won the most awards in this category, with four, and has received the most nominated for the award on ten occasions, the most within the category.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Limited Series

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Limited Series represents excellence in the category of limited series that are two or more episodes with a total running time of at least 150 minutes. The program must tell a complete, non-recurring story, and not have an ongoing storyline or main characters in subsequent seasons.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie is an award presented annually by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS). It is given in honor of an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance in a supporting role on a television limited series or television movie for the primetime network season.

The award was first presented at the 27th Primetime Emmy Awards on May 19, 1975 to Juliet Mills for her role as Samantha Cody in QB VII. The award ceremony garnered criticism during the 58th Primetime Emmy Awards when Ellen Burstyn received a nomination for her work in Mrs. Harris (2005), despite having 14 seconds of screen time and 38 words of dialogue. This resulted in a rule change, requiring nominees submitting for the category to have more than 5% screen-time on their respective projects.Since its inception, the award has been given to 38 actresses. Regina King, Jane Alexander, Judy Davis, Colleen Dewhurst and Mare Winningham have each won two awards. Kathy Bates is the most nominated actress in the category with seven nominations.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Television Movie

This is a list of the winners of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Made for Television Movie, which is awarded since 1992. The category was originally called Outstanding Drama or Comedy Special.In 1991, Outstanding Drama or Comedy Special category was merged with Outstanding Miniseries category to form Outstanding Drama or Comedy Special and Miniseries and the number of nominations increased from five to six. For this year, two miniseries had competed with four "made for television movies". The following year, 1992, the new category was split to re-form the Outstanding Miniseries and Outstanding Made for Television Movie categories.

In 2011, the category was merged with the Outstanding Limited Series category to create the Outstanding Miniseries or Movie category. However, in 2014, the decision was reversed, and the separate Miniseries and Television Movie categories were reinstated. Rules were also changed in 2019 requiring at least a 75-minute runtime for movies to be eligible.In the history of this category, there has been four incidents of ties. The first occurred in 1976 when Eleanor and Franklin: The White House Years tied with Sybil, the second occurred in 1989 when Day One tied with Roe vs. Wade, the third occurred in 1990 when Caroline? tied with The Incident, and the fourth occurred in 1993 when Barbarians at the Gate tied with Stalin.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series is an award presented annually by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS). It was first awarded at the 7th Primetime Emmy Awards ceremony, held in 1955 and it is given in honor of a writer or writers who produced an outstanding story or screenplay for an episode of a television drama series during the primetime network season. Undergoing several name changes, the award received its current title at the 48th Primetime Emmy Awards in 1996.

Since its inception, the award has been presented to 74 writers. Joel Fields and Joe Weisberg are the current recipients of the award for their work on the episode of FX's The Americans titled "START". Rod Serling holds the record for most wins for this category at six. The Sopranos also hold the record for most wins and nominations for this category at six and 21, respectively.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special

This is a list of the winners and nominees of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special.

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