Academy Award for Best Animated Feature

The Academy Award for Best Animated Feature is given each year for animated films. An animated feature is defined by the Academy as a film with a running time of more than 40 minutes in which characters' performances are created using a frame-by-frame technique, a significant number of the major characters are animated, and animation figures in no less than 75 percent of the running time. The Academy Award for Best Animated Feature was first awarded in 2002 for films made in 2001.[1][2][3]

The entire AMPAS membership has been eligible to choose the winner since the award's inception. If there are sixteen or more films submitted for the category, the winner is voted from a shortlist of five films, which has happened nine times, otherwise there will only be three films on the shortlist.[4] Additionally, eight eligible animated features must have been theatrically released in Los Angeles County within the calendar year for this category to be activated.

Animated films can also be nominated for other categories, but have rarely been so; Beauty and the Beast (1991) was the first animated film ever nominated for Best Picture. Up (2009) and Toy Story 3 (2010) also received Best Picture nominations after the Academy expanded the number of nominees from five to ten.

Waltz with Bashir (2008) is the only animated film ever nominated for Best Foreign Language Film (though it did not receive a nomination for Best Animated Feature). The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) and Kubo and the Two Strings (2016) are the only two animated films to ever be nominated for Best Visual Effects, with the latter being nominated for Best Animated Feature.

Academy Award for Best Animated Feature
Awarded forThe best animated film with a running time of more than 40 minutes, a significant number of the major characters animated, and at least 75 percent of the picture's running time including animation.
CountryUnited States
Presented byAcademy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS)
First awarded2001 (for Shrek)
Currently held bySpider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018)
Websiteoscars.org

History

For much of the Academy Awards' history, AMPAS was resistant to the idea of a regular Oscar for animated features, considering there were simply too few produced to justify such consideration.[5] Instead, the Academy occasionally bestowed special Oscars for exceptional productions, usually for Walt Disney Pictures, such as for Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs in 1938,[6] and the Special Achievement Academy Award for the live action/animated hybrid Who Framed Roger Rabbit in 1989[7] and Toy Story in 1996.[8] In fact, prior to the creation of the award, only one animated film was nominated for Best Picture: 1991's Beauty and the Beast, also by Walt Disney Pictures.

By 2001, the rise of sustained competitors to Disney in the feature animated film market, such as DreamWorks Animation (founded by former Disney executive Jeffrey Katzenberg), created an increase of film releases of significant annual number enough for AMPAS to reconsider.[9] The Academy Award for Best Animated Feature was first given out at the 74th Academy Awards,[10] held on March 24, 2002.[11] The Academy included a rule that stated that the award would not be presented in a year in which fewer than eight eligible films opened in theaters.[12]

People in the animation industry and fans expressed hope that the prestige from this award and the resulting boost to the box office would encourage the increased production of animated features. Some members and fans have criticized the award, however, saying it is only intended to prevent animated films from having a chance of winning Best Picture. DreamWorks had advertised heavily during the holiday 2001 season for Shrek, but was disappointed when the rumored Best Picture nomination did not materialize, though it was nominated for and ended up winning the inaugural Best Animated Feature award.[1]

The criticism of Best Animated Feature was particularly prominent at the 81st Academy Awards, in which WALL-E won the award but was not nominated for Best Picture, despite receiving widespread acclaim from critics and audiences alike and being generally considered one of the best films of 2008.[13][14][15][16] This led to controversy over whether the film was deliberately snubbed of the nomination by the Academy. Film critic Peter Travers commented that "If there was ever a time where an animated feature deserved to be nominated for Best Picture, it's WALL-E." However, official Academy Award regulations state that any movie nominated for this category can still be nominated for Best Picture.[4] There have been complaints that the Best Animated Feature award is held in unfairly low regard by Academy members with many members refusing to vote for films they consider mere children's fare beneath them, or letting their own children see the films and go with their opinions instead. The dominance of Disney and Pixar allegedly as a result of this bias is suggested to be injuring the credibility of the award.[17]

In 2009, when the nominee slots for Best Picture were doubled to ten, Up was nominated for both Best Animated Feature and Best Picture at the 82nd Academy Awards, the first film to do so since the creation of the Animated Feature category. This feat was repeated the following year by Toy Story 3. Since 2010 onward, with the increasing competitiveness of the Animated Feature category, Pixar (a perennial nominee) did not receive nominations for several recent films considering the studio has released films of more mixed critical reaction and box office earnings, while Pixar's sister studio Disney Animation won their first three awards.[18]

In 2010, the Academy enacted a new rule regarding the motion capture technique employed in films such as Robert Zemeckis' A Christmas Carol and Steven Spielberg's The Adventures of Tintin, and how they might not be eligible in this category in the future. This rule was possibly made to prevent nominations of live-action films that rely heavily on motion capture, such as James Cameron's Avatar.

Winners and nominees

2000s

Year Film Nominees
2001
(74th)
[11]
Shrek Aron Warner
Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius John A. Davis & Steve Oedekerk
Monsters, Inc. Pete Docter & John Lasseter
2002
(75th)
[19]
Spirited Away Hayao Miyazaki
Ice Age Chris Wedge
Lilo & Stitch Chris Sanders
Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron Jeffrey Katzenberg
Treasure Planet Ron Clements
2003
(76th)
[20]
Finding Nemo Andrew Stanton
Brother Bear Aaron Blaise & Robert Walker
The Triplets of Belleville Sylvain Chomet
2004
(77th)
[21]
The Incredibles Brad Bird
Shark Tale Bill Damaschke
Shrek 2 Andrew Adamson
2005
(78th)
[22]
Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit Nick Park & Steve Box
Howl's Moving Castle Hayao Miyazaki
Tim Burton's Corpse Bride Tim Burton & Mike Johnson
2006
(79th)
[23]
Happy Feet George Miller
Cars John Lasseter
Monster House Gil Kenan
2007
(80th)
[24]
Ratatouille Brad Bird
Persepolis Vincent Paronnaud & Marjane Satrapi
Surf's Up Ash Brannon & Chris Buck
2008
(81st)
[25]
WALL-E Andrew Stanton
Bolt Byron Howard & Chris Williams
Kung Fu Panda Mark Osborne & John Stevenson
2009
(82nd)
[26]
Up Pete Docter
Coraline Henry Selick
Fantastic Mr. Fox Wes Anderson
The Princess and the Frog Ron Clements & John Musker
The Secret of Kells Tomm Moore

2010s

Year Film Nominees
2010
(83rd)
[27]
Toy Story 3 Lee Unkrich
How to Train Your Dragon Dean DeBlois & Chris Sanders
The Illusionist Sylvain Chomet
2011
(84th)
[28]
Rango Gore Verbinski
A Cat in Paris Jean-Loup Felicioli & Alain Gagnol
Chico & Rita Javier Mariscal & Fernando Trueba
Kung Fu Panda 2 Jennifer Yuh Nelson
Puss in Boots Chris Miller
2012
(85th)
[29]
Brave Mark Andrews & Brenda Chapman
Frankenweenie Tim Burton
ParaNorman Chris Butler & Sam Fell
The Pirates! Band of Misfits Peter Lord
Wreck-It Ralph Rich Moore
2013
(86th)
[30]
Frozen Chris Buck, Peter Del Vecho & Jennifer Lee
The Croods Kristine Belson, Kirk DeMicco & Chris Sanders
Despicable Me 2 Pierre Coffin, Chris Meledandri & Chris Renaud
Ernest & Celestine Didier Brunner & Benjamin Renner
The Wind Rises Hayao Miyazaki & Toshio Suzuki
2014
(87th)
[31]
Big Hero 6 Roy Conli, Don Hall & Chris Williams
The Boxtrolls Graham Annable, Travis Knight & Anthony Stacchi
How to Train Your Dragon 2 Bonnie Arnold & Dean DeBlois
Song of the Sea Tomm Moore & Paul Young
The Tale of the Princess Kaguya Yoshiaki Nishimura & Isao Takahata
2015
(88th)
[32]
Inside Out Pete Docter & Jonas Rivera
Anomalisa Duke Johnson, Charlie Kaufman & Rosa Tran
Boy and the World Alê Abreu
Shaun the Sheep Movie Mark Burton & Richard Starzak
When Marnie Was There Yoshiaki Nishimura & Hiromasa Yonebayashi
2016
(89th)
[33]
Zootopia Byron Howard, Rich Moore & Clark Spencer
Kubo and the Two Strings Travis Knight & Arianne Sutner
Moana Ron Clements, John Musker & Osnat Shurer
My Life as a Zucchini Claude Barras & Max Karli
The Red Turtle Michaël Dudok de Wit & Toshio Suzuki
2017
(90th)
[34]
Coco Lee Unkrich & Darla K. Anderson
The Boss Baby Tom McGrath & Ramsey Ann Naito
The Breadwinner Anthony Leo & Nora Twomey
Ferdinand Lori Forte & Carlos Saldanha
Loving Vincent Dorota Kobiela, Ivan Mactaggart & Hugh Welchman
2018
(91st)
[35]
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey, Rodney Rothman, Phil Lord & Christopher Miller
Incredibles 2 Brad Bird, Nicole Paradis Grindle & John Walker
Isle of Dogs Wes Anderson, Jeremy Dawson, Steven Rales & Scott Rudin
Mirai Mamoru Hosoda & Yūichirō Saitō
Ralph Breaks the Internet Rich Moore, Phil Johnston & Clark Spencer

Multiple wins

2 wins

Multiple nominations

3 nominations
2 nominations

Studios with multiple nominations

Studio Wins Nominations Films
Pixar 9 12 Monsters, Inc., Finding Nemo, The Incredibles, Cars, Ratatouille, WALL-E, Up, Toy Story 3, Brave, Inside Out, Coco, Incredibles 2
Disney 3 11 Lilo & Stitch, Treasure Planet, Brother Bear, Bolt, The Princess and the Frog, Wreck-It Ralph, Frozen, Big Hero 6, Zootopia, Moana, Ralph Breaks the Internet
DreamWorks Animation 1 Shrek, Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron, Shrek 2, Shark Tale, Kung Fu Panda, How to Train Your Dragon, Kung Fu Panda 2, Puss in Boots, The Croods, How to Train Your Dragon 2, The Boss Baby
Studio Ghibli 6 Spirited Away, Howl's Moving Castle, The Wind Rises, The Tale of the Princess Kaguya, When Marnie Was There, The Red Turtle (co-production)
Aardman 3 Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit, The Pirates! Band of Misfits, Shaun the Sheep Movie
Nickelodeon 2 Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius, Rango
Sony Surf's Up, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Laika 0 4 Coraline, ParaNorman, The Boxtrolls, Kubo and the Two Strings
Cartoon Saloon 3 The Secret of Kells, Song of the Sea, The Breadwinner
Les Armateurs 2 The Triplets of Belleville, Ernest & Celestine
Blue Sky Ice Age, Ferdinand
Tim Burton Corpse Bride, Frankenweenie
American Empirical Pictures Fantastic Mr. Fox, Isle of Dogs

Medium breakdown

Computer-animated nominees

Pixar

Disney

DreamWorks Animation

Nickelodeon

  • Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius
  • Rango

Blue Sky

Sony

Other films

Stop-motion nominees

Aardman

Laika

Tim Burton

American Empirical Pictures

Other films

Traditionally animated nominees

Disney

Studio Ghibli

Les Armateurs

Cartoon Saloon

Other films

Foreign language films

The Academy Awards have also nominated a number of non-English language films.

Japanese nominees

All the Japanese films on this list have also been released with English language dubbing.

Studio Ghibli

Other films

French nominees

Les Armateurs

Other films

Other languages

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "15 Amazing Animated Movies That Were Snubbed By The Oscars". 7 February 2017.
  2. ^ "'Shrek' wins for animated feature". USA Today. Associated Press. March 25, 2002. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
  3. ^ "100 Greatest Movies, TV Shows, and More". Entertainment Weekly. December 4, 2009. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
  4. ^ a b "Rule Seven: Special Rules for the Animated Feature Film Award". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on June 5, 2011. Retrieved April 26, 2011.
  5. ^ Osbourne, Robert (2013). 85 Years of the Oscar. Abberville Press. p. 357. ISBN 978-0-7892-1142-2.
  6. ^ Osbourne. 85 Years. p. 58.
  7. ^ Osbourne. 85 Years. p. 298.
  8. ^ Osbourne. 85 Years. p. 327.
  9. ^ Osbourne. 85 Years. p. 357.
  10. ^ "History of the Academy Awards". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved August 23, 2011.
  11. ^ a b "74th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  12. ^ "5 Reasons the Academy Overlooked 'The LEGO Movie'". Retrieved 18 January 2015.
  13. ^ "The 2008 Top Tens". Archived from the original on 31 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-27.
  14. ^ Keegan Winters, Rebecca (July 7, 2008). "Can WALL-E Win Best Picture?". Time. Retrieved April 9, 2014.
  15. ^ Bandyk, Matthew (January 22, 2009). "Academy Awards Controversy: Wall-E Gets Snubbed For Best Picture Oscar". US News. Archived from the original on July 17, 2011. Retrieved April 9, 2014.
  16. ^ Breznican, Anthony (July 2, 2008). "Is the best-picture Oscar within WALL-E's reach?". USA Today. Retrieved April 9, 2014.
  17. ^ Amidi, Amid. "Academy Members Don't Care About Animation: 2017 Edition". Cartoon Brew. Retrieved 2 March 2017.
  18. ^ "Why Disney Fired John Lasseter - And How He Came Back to Heal the Studio". 21 February 2014.
  19. ^ "75th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  20. ^ "76th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  21. ^ "77th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  22. ^ "78th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  23. ^ "79th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  24. ^ "80th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  25. ^ "81st Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  26. ^ "82nd Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  27. ^ "83rd Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  28. ^ "84th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved November 28, 2012.
  29. ^ "85th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved January 16, 2014.
  30. ^ "86th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved January 16, 2014.
  31. ^ "87th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  32. ^ "88th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved January 14, 2016.
  33. ^ "89th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved January 24, 2017.
  34. ^ "90th Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved January 23, 2018.
  35. ^ "91st Academy Awards Nominees". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved January 22, 2019.

External links

Annie Award for Best Animated Feature

The Annie Award for Best Animated Feature is an Annie Award introduced in 1992, awarded annually to the best animated feature film. In 1998 the award was renamed Outstanding Achievement in an Animated Theatrical Feature, only to revert to its original title again in 2001.

Since the 2001 inception of the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, the Annie Award has typically gone to the same film (except in 2006, 2008, 2010, 2012, and 2014).

Anthony Leo

Anthony Leo is a Canadian filmmaker and producer best known for producing the 2017 animated film The Breadwinner, which earned him an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature nomination at the 90th Academy Awards.

Arianne Sutner

Arianne Sutner is an American film producer and animator, best known for producing the stop-motion animated film Kubo and the Two Strings. She was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature at the 89th Academy Awards.

Aron Warner

Aron J. Warner is an American producer and actor. He won an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature as a producer of the animated blockbuster Shrek, in which he also voices the Big Bad Wolf.

BreakThru Films

BreakThru Films is a film production company based in Sopot in Poland. Founded in 2002 by Hugh Welchman and initially based in the United Kingdom. The company concentrated mostly in the production of short films, animation, documentary and live-stage shows but has since focused mainly on feature films. Their 2006 short film Peter and the Wolf was awarded an Academy Award for Best Short Film (Animated) and their 2017 feature film Loving Vincent was Academy nominated for Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.

Chris Butler (filmmaker)

Chris Butler (born 1974 in Liverpool, Merseyside) is a British storyboard artist, writer and director, known for his works at Laika, such as ParaNorman, which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.He studied animation at the University for the Creative Arts.

Les Armateurs

Les Armateurs is a French film production company focused on animation. It was founded by Didier Brunner in 1994 and is based in Paris. It produces feature films, short films and television series. Brunner served as the president of the company until 2014, when he was succeeded by Reginald de Guillebon. He retains a role as consultant.Les Armateurs first received international attention with the release of the 1997 short film The Old Lady and the Pigeons, directed by Sylvain Chomet. Several of the company's subsequent productions and co-productions have been nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.

List of submissions to the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature

This is a list of submissions for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature since it started in 2001 (where DreamWorks Animation's Shrek was the inaugural winner.). An animated feature is defined by the Academy as a film with a running time of more than 40 minutes in which characters' performances are created using a frame-by-frame technique, a significant number of the major characters are animated, and animation figures in no less than 75 percent of the running time.

The entire AMPAS membership has been eligible to choose the winner since the award's inception. If there are sixteen or more films submitted for the category, the winner is voted from a shortlist of five films, which has happened nine times, otherwise there will only be three films on the shortlist. Additionally, eight eligible animated features must have been theatrically released in Los Angeles County within the calendar year for this category to be activated.

Some submissions to the Best Animated Feature category were live-action/animation hybrids, but only three films were disqualified for not meeting the 75 percent threshold. This happened with Arthur and the Invisibles in 2006, Yogi Bear in 2010, and The Smurfs in 2011. Consequently, the former two disqualifications reduced the shortlist from five films to three films in 2006 and 2010 respectively, while the latter in 2011 did not.

Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Animated Film

The Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Animated Feature is one of the annual awards given by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association.

This award had been given since 1989 and between 2001 and present it helps with the nominations for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.

Max Karli

Max Karli is a Swiss film producer, best known for producing critically acclaimed film My Life as a Zucchini, for which he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature at the 89th Academy Awards, losing to Zootopia.

Mili Pictures Worldwide

Mili Pictures Worldwide (Chinese: 米粒影业) is a feature film animation company based in Shanghai, China. The company's first film, Dragon Nest: Warriors' Dawn, based on the online game Dragon Nest, was released in China in July 2014. The company opened an office in Los Angeles, California in spring 2014, headed by producer Bill Borden (producer of High School Musical and other films). The company's next feature project, Ping Pong Rabbit, is currently in pre-production in Los Angeles. Ping Pong Rabbit is being directed by Mike Johnson, who was nominated for the 2005 Academy Award for Best Animated Feature as co-director (with Tim Burton) of Corpse Bride.

Pentamedia Graphics

Pentafour Software is a pioneer in software & digital media in Asia . The main activities are projects, products, consultancy & training in software & digital media.

The company has created numerous animated features, both traditionally and computer-animated, and once employed as many as 2000 employees. However, in the past few years they have laid off all but 200.

Pandavas: The Five Warriors received National Film Award for Best Feature Film in English in 2000.Alibabba,Son of Aladdin(Released as Mustafa and the Magician),Legend of buddha and Gulliver's Travels were shortlisted for Academy Award for Best Animated Feature but were not able to get a nomination

Producers Guild of America Award for Best Animated Motion Picture

The Producers Guild of America Award for Outstanding Producer of Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures is an award annually given since 2005.

Of all fourteen films awarded, ten have gone on to win the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.

Rich Moore

Rich Moore (born May 10, 1963) is an American film and television animation director, screenwriter, voice actor and a creative partner at both Rough Draft Korea and Walt Disney Animation Studios. In addition to directing the Disney animated film Wreck-It Ralph (2012) and co-directing Zootopia (2016) and Ralph Breaks the Internet (2018), he has worked on the animated television series The Simpsons, The Critic and Futurama. He is a two-time Emmy Award winner, a three-time Annie Award winner and an Academy Award winner.

Roy Conli

Roy Conli is an American film producer and voice actor. He won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature for the 2014 Walt Disney Animation Studios film Big Hero 6 at the 87th Academy Awards in 2015.

Timeline of The Walt Disney Company

This is a timeline of The Walt Disney Company, listing notable business events for the organization.

Tomm Moore

Thomas "Tomm" Moore (born January 7, 1977) is an Irish filmmaker, animator, illustrator and comics artist. He is co-founder of Cartoon Saloon, an animation studio and production company based in Kilkenny, Ireland. His first two feature films, The Secret of Kells (2009), co-directed with Nora Twomey, and Song of the Sea (2014), have received critical acclaim and were both nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature.

Vicky Jenson

Victoria "Vicky" Jenson (born 1960) is a film director of both live-action and animated films, and has been said to be "one of Hollywood's most inspiring female Directors". She has directed projects for DreamWorks Animation including Shrek, the first film to win an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, giving rise to one of Hollywood's largest film franchises.

Yoshiaki Nishimura

Yoshiaki Nishimura (西村 義明, Nishimura Yoshiaki, born September 25, 1977 in Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese lead film producer formerly of Studio Ghibli and founder of the company Studio Ponoc. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature in 2014 for The Tale of Princess Kaguya and received a consecutive Oscar nomination at the 88th Academy Awards for When Marnie Was There in same category.

Awards of Merit
Special awards
Former awards
Ceremonies‡
Footnote
Academy Award for Best Animated Feature
2000s
2010s

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