Abraham John Valpy

Abraham John Valpy (1787 – 19 November 1854) was an English printer and publisher.

Life

He was the son of the Reading schoolmaster Richard Valpy. He is remembered in connection with two great undertakings in the department of classical literature. These were reissues of (1) Stephanus' Greek Thesaurus, for which E. H. Barker was chiefly responsible; and (2) the Delphin Classics in 143 volumes with variorum notes, under the editorial superintendence of George Dyer. He also founded the Classical Journal in 1810.[1]

Notes

  1. ^  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Valpy, Richard, s.v." . Encyclopædia Britannica. 27 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 866.

References

External links

ValpyFJ tree
Ad usum Delphini

The Delphin Classics or Ad usum Delphini was series of annotated editions of the Latin classics, intended to be comprehensive, which was originally created in the 17th century.

The first volumes were created in the 1670s for Louis, le Grand Dauphin, heir of Louis XIV (Delphin is the adjective derived from Dauphin, and were written entirely in Latin. Thirty-nine scholars contributed to the series, which was edited by Pierre Huet with assistance from several co-editors, including Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet and Anne Dacier. The main features included the main Latin texts; a paraphrase in the margins or below in simpler Latin prose (an ordo verborum); extended notes on specific words and lines, mainly about history, myth, geography, or natural sciences; and indices. One useful pedagogical feature of this series is that it keeps students reading and working in the target language (Latin). .

The original volumes each had an engraving of Arion and the Dolphin, accompanied by the inscription in usum serenissimi Delphini (for the use of the most serene Dauphin). The collection includes 64 volumes published from 1670 to 1698.The Ad Usum Delphini series were reprinted for centuries, and served in classrooms across Europe and the Americas. Beginning in 1819 a series of Latin classics was published in England under the name Delphin Classics by Abraham John Valpy. This series was edited by George Dyer (poet), who produced 143 volumes.

The expression Ad usum Delphini was sometimes used on other texts which had been expurgated because they contained passages considered inappropriate for the youth, and has been used pejoratively to indicate any work expurgated for the sake of younger audiences, and not just this series of Latin texts and commentaries.

Constable's Miscellany

Constable's Miscellany was a part publishing serial established by Archibald Constable. Three numbers made up a volume; many of the works were divided into several volumes. The price of a number was one shilling. The full series title was Constable's Miscellany of Original and Selected Publications, in the Various Departments of Literature, Science, and the Arts.

Archibald Constable died in 1827, and the Miscellany was taken over by a consortium of Aitken, Henry Constable, and a London publisher. When the publisher went bankrupt in 1831, the project became relatively dormant. The entire list was later advertised by the London firm of Whittaker & Co. There were 80 volumes in all, the first appearing in 1826 and the last in 1835.

Delphin Classics

The Delphin Classics was an edition of the Latin classics, intended to be comprehensive, which was originally created in the 17th century.

The 25 volumes were created in the 1670s for Louis, le Grand Dauphin, heir of Louis XIV (Delphin is the adjective derived from dauphin), and were written in Latin. Thirty-nine scholars contributed to the series, which was edited by Pierre Huet with assistance from several co-editors, including Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet and Anne Dacier. Each work was accompanied by a Latin commentary, ordo verborum, and verbal index. The editors added many notes and appendixes.

The original volumes each had an engraving of Arion and the Dolphin, accompanied by the inscription in usum serenissimi Delphini (for the use of the most serene Dauphin).

Beginning in 1819 a series of Latin classics was published in England under the name Delphin Classics by Abraham John Valpy. This series was edited by George Dyer (poet), who produced 143 volumes. They are no longer current.

There is a reference to them in Part I, Chapter 5 of Thomas Hardy's Jude the Obscure, where young Jude, trying to educate himself by reading while delivering bread from a horse and cart, "plunge[s] into the simpler passages from Caesar, Virgil, or Horace [. . .] The only copies he had been able to lay hands on were old Delphin editions, because they were superseded, and therefore cheap. But, bad for idle school-boys, it did so happen that they were passably good for him."

Edmund Henry Barker

Edmund Henry Barker (1788 – 21 March 1839) was an English classical scholar.

George Dyer (poet)

George Dyer (1755–1841) was an English classicist, poet and editor.

Gin Craze

The Gin Craze was a period in the first half of the 18th century when the consumption of gin increased rapidly in Great Britain, especially in London. Daniel Defoe commented: "the Distillers have found out a way to hit the palate of the Poor, by their new fashion'd compound Waters called Geneva, so that the common People seem not to value the French-brandy as usual, and even not to desire it". Many people overconsumed and the city had an epidemic of extreme drunkenness; this provoked moral outrage and a legislative backlash that some compare to the modern drug wars.

Parliament passed five major Acts, in 1729, 1736, 1743, 1747 and 1751, designed to control the consumption of gin. Though many similar drinks were available and alcohol consumption was considerable at all levels of society, gin caused the greatest public concern. Although it is commonly thought gin or Jenever was the singular drink, "gin" was a blanket statement for all grain-based alcohols at the time.

James Campbell (land commissioner)

Lieutenant-Colonel James Campbell (1787 – 7 July 1858) was a lieutenant-colonel of the British army who distinguished himself in the Peninsular War. He emigrated to New Zealand and was appointed as a land commissioner, and later as Registrar of Deeds, in Canterbury.

Meliboea (Histiaeotis)

Meliboea or Meliboia (Ancient Greek: Μελίβοια) was a town of Histiaeotis in ancient Thessaly. It was located near Aeginium and Tricca.William Martin Leake conjectured that its site was at the present town of Vasiliki, and modern scholarship still leaves the site as unknown.Abraham John Valpy suggested to read Livy as meaning the city known by Strabo as Melitoea and by Ptolemy as Melitara (now Militra) near Phthiotidis and Thessaliotidis, since Valpy was aware of Meliboea in Magnesia.

Philarète Chasles

Victor Euphemien Philarète Chasles (8 October 1798 – 18 July 1873) was a French critic and man of letters.

He was born at Mainvilliers, Eure-et-Loir. His father, Pierre Jacques Michel Chasles (1754–1826), was a member of the Convention, and was one of those who voted the death of Louis XVI. He brought up his son according to the principles of Rousseau's Emile, and the boy, after a regime of outdoor life, followed by some years classical study, was apprenticed to a printer, so that he might make acquaintance with manual labor. His master was involved in one of the plots of 1815, and Philarète suffered two months imprisonment.On his release he was sent to London, where he worked for the printer Abraham John Valpy on editions of classical authors. He wrote articles for the English reviews, and on his return to France did much to popularize the study of English authors. He was also one of the earliest to draw attention in France to Scandinavian and Russian literature. He contributed to the Revue des deux mondes, until he had a violent quarrel, terminating in a lawsuit, with François Buloz, who won his case.He became librarian of the Bibliothèque Mazarine, and from 1841 was professor of comparative literature at the Collège de France. During his active life he produced some fifty volumes of literary history and criticism, and of social history, much of which is extremely valuable. He died at Venice in 1873.His son, Émile Chasles (1827–1908), was a philologist of some reputation.Among his best critical works is Dix-huitime siècle en Angleterre (1846), one of a series of 20 vols. of Etudes de littérature comparée (1846–1875), which he called later Trente ans de critique. An account of his strenuous boyhood is given in his Maison de mon pré. His Memoires (1876–1877) did not fulfil the expectations based on his brilliant talk.

Richard Valpy

Richard Valpy DD (7 December 1754 – 28 March 1836) was a schoolmaster in Great Britain.

Valpy

Valpy may refer to:

Abraham John Valpy (1787–1854), English printer and publisher

Arabella Valpy (1833–1910), New Zealand Salvation Army leader

Juliet Valpy (1835–1911), New Zealand artist

Michael Valpy (born 1942), award-winning Canadian journalist and author

Richard Valpy (1754–1836), schoolmaster in Great Britain

William Henry Valpy (1793–1852), pioneering New Zealand settler

William Henry Valpy, Jr. (1832–1911), pioneering New Zealand settler

Valpy French (1825–1891), Anglican missionary in India and Persia

Catherine Fulton, née Valpy (1829–1919), New Zealand suffragist

Ellen Jeffreys, née Valpy (1827–1904), New Zealand artist

William Henry Valpy

William Henry Valpy (1793 – 25 September 1852) was a noted early settler of Dunedin, New Zealand. He is sometimes referred to locally as "The father of Saint Clair", as he was the first settler in the area now occupied by the suburb of Saint Clair.Valpy was the son of English educationalist Richard Valpy and the younger brother of the English printer and publisher Abraham John Valpy. Valpy spent much of his early life in Calcutta, where he worked as a judge. He retired to England in 1836, but poor health prompted him to emigrate with his family to healthier climes. They arrived in the new settlement of Otago only one year after its founding, in January 1849. William, with his wife Caroline (born 1804; née Jeffreys) travelled with five of their six children: artist Ellen Penelope Valpy Jeffreys, Catherine Henrietta Elliot Valpy Fulton (who became a suffragist), Arabella Valpy (who was instrumental in bringing the Salvation Army to New Zealand), Juliet Valpy, and William. Their sixth child, Caroline, remained in England with her husband.At the time he was regarded as the wealthiest man in the colony. Valpy was the first settler in the south Dunedin area, with two large farm properties he named "Caversham" and "The Forbury" after places connected with his family in and around the town of Reading, in the English county of Berkshire. The names still survive as the names of Dunedin's suburbs of Caversham and Forbury, and a road in the suburb of Saint Clair close to the former site of the Forbury estate buildings is named Valpy Street. These farms were important sources of employment for many of the new community, as was Valpy's construction of a road linking the properties with the heart of the city. This road formed the basis of several arterial routes still in use in Dunedin.

Valpy was heavily involved in local politics, though his Anglican English background came under strenuous attack from the Scottish Presbyterian community of early Dunedin. In May 1851, Valpy was invited by Sir George Grey to represent Otago in the original New Zealand Legislative Council. Following a numerously attended public meeting in opposition of Valpy accepting the invitation, Valpy declined. The strain of this conflict, along with Valpy's continuing poor health, took their toll, and Valpy died in Dunedin in September 1852, only three and a half years after he had arrived in New Zealand. Whilst his health had been delicate, his death on 25 September 1852 was unexpected. Just three days earlier, his daughters Juliet and Catherine had married at his homestead; the latter had married James Fulton. Caroline Valpy died on 30 October 1884 at Mornington, aged 80.

William Hillary

Sir William Hillary, 1st Baronet (4 January 1771 – 5 January 1847) was an English militia officer, author and philanthropist, best known as the founder, in 1824, of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution..

William Rose (schoolmaster and writer)

Dr William Rose (1719–1786) was a Scottish schoolmaster and classical scholar.

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