Abner Dalrymple

Abner Frank Dalrymple (September 9, 1857 – January 25, 1939) was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball who hit 43 home runs (including 22 in 1884, the second-highest total to that date) and batted .288 during his 12-season career spent primarily with the Chicago White Stockings. Born in Gratiot, Wisconsin, he played for the Milwaukee Grays, White Stockings, Pittsburgh Alleghenys, and Milwaukee Brewers.

Dalrymple started his major league career in 1878 with the National League's Milwaukee Grays, and that season, he had a career-high .354 batting average.[1] He spent the next eight seasons with the Chicago White Stockings, for whom he starred as the leadoff hitter on five NL pennant winners. In 1880, Dalrymple led the league in hits (126) and runs scored (91). In 1881, he became the first batter known to be given an intentional walk with the bases loaded. He hit four doubles in a game in 1883, which still ties him for the major league record. In 1884, aided by the short right field fence at his home park, Dalrymple hit a career-high 22 home runs and moved into sixth place on the all-time home run list. On the strength of 11 home runs for the 1885 champions, he moved up one place. For the remainder of his career, he hit only six home runs. His hitting declined in 1886, and his major league career ended five years later.

Dalrymple died in Warren, Illinois at age 81.

Abner Dalrymple
Abner Dalrymple
Left fielder
Born: September 9, 1857
Gratiot, Wisconsin
Died: January 25, 1939 (aged 81)
Warren, Illinois
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 1, 1878, for the Milwaukee Grays
Last MLB appearance
October 2, 1891, for the Milwaukee Brewers
MLB statistics
Batting average.288
Hits1202
Runs813
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ "Abner Dalrymple Statistics and History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved July 9, 2013.

Further reading

External links

Achievements
Preceded by
Jimmy Ryan
Hitting for the cycle
September 12, 1891
Succeeded by
Lave Cross
1878 Milwaukee Grays season

The Milwaukee Grays were members of the National League for only the 1878 season, having played as an independent team in 1877. They finished in sixth place, one of only two teams to finish below .500.

1879 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1879 Chicago White Stockings season was the 8th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 4th in the National League and the 2nd at Lakefront Park. The White Stockings finished fourth in the National League with a record of 46–33.

1880 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1880 Chicago White Stockings season was the 9th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 5th in the National League and the 3rd at Lakefront Park. The White Stockings won the National League championship with a record of 67–17.

1881 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1881 Chicago White Stockings season was the 10th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 6th in the National League and the 4th at Lakefront Park. The White Stockings won the National League championship with a record of 56–28.

1882 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1882 Chicago White Stockings season was the 11th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 7th in the National League and the 5th at Lakefront Park. The White Stockings won the National League championship with a record of 55–29, 3 games ahead of the second place Providence Grays.

1883 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1883 Chicago White Stockings season was the 12th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 8th in the National League and the 6th at Lakefront Park. The White Stockings finished second in the National League with a record of 59–39.

1884 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1884 Chicago White Stockings season was the 13th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 9th in the National League and the 7th at Lakefront Park. The White Stockings finished fifth in the National League with a record of 62–50. White Stocking 3rd baseman, Ned Williamson set the then major league single season home run record with 27 home runs.

1885 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1885 Chicago White Stockings season was the 14th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 10th in the National League and the 1st at the first West Side Park. The White Stockings won the National League pennant for the first time since 1882, beating the New York Giants by two games. They went on to face the St. Louis Browns in the 1885 World Series. The series ended without a champion, with both teams winning three games with one tie.

1886 Chicago White Stockings season

The 1886 Chicago White Stockings season was the 15th season of the Chicago White Stockings franchise, the 11th in the National League and the 2nd at the first West Side Park. The White Stockings finished first in the National League with a record of 90–34, 2.5 games ahead of the second place Detroit Wolverines. The team was defeated four games to two by the St. Louis Browns in the 1886 World Series.

1886 World Series

The 1886 World Series was won by the St. Louis Browns (later the Cardinals) of the American Association over the Chicago White Stockings (later the Cubs) of the National League, four games to two. The series was played on six consecutive days running from October 18 to October 23 in Chicago and St. Louis.

The teams were judged to be approximately equal going into the series, with gamblers betting on the teams at even odds. However, Chicago pitcher Jim McCormick was sidelined by a chronic foot ailment after game 2, and third Chicago pitcher Jocko Flynn had already been lost for the season due to an arm ailment. An effort to use a substitute pitcher was protested by St. Louis, with the board of umpires flipping a coin to decide the matter in favor of the Browns. With his team unable to field a competent second starter, Chicagos ace John Clarkson proved unable to carry the full pitching load, tipping the series to St. Louis.

The series was decided in extra innings of game 6 by Curt Welch's so-called "$15,000 slide" following a passed ball. The decisive run scored by Welch became one of the most famous plays in the history of baseball in that era.

1887 Pittsburgh Alleghenys season

The 1887 Pittsburgh Alleghenys season was the sixth season of the Pittsburgh Alleghenys franchise and its first in the National League. The Alleghenys finished sixth in the standings with a record of 55–69.

1888 Pittsburgh Alleghenys season

The 1888 Pittsburgh Alleghenys season was the 7th season of the Pittsburgh Alleghenys franchise and their 2nd in the National League. The Alleghenys finished sixth in the league standings with a record of 66–68.

1901 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1901 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing 4th in the American League with a record of 74 wins and 62 losses. The franchise that would become the modern Athletics originated in 1901 as a new franchise in the American League.

Bill Nicholson (baseball)

William Beck "Swish" Nicholson (December 11, 1914 – March 8, 1996) was a right fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics (1936), Chicago Cubs (1939–1948) and Philadelphia Phillies (1949–1953). A native of Chestertown, Maryland, where he attended Washington College, he batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

In 1944, Nicholson received an intentional walk with the bases loaded. He is listed as one of only six players in major league history to do it. The others are Abner Dalrymple (1881), Nap Lajoie (1901), Del Bissonette (1928), Barry Bonds (1998) and Josh Hamilton (2008).

List of Major League Baseball career fielding errors as an outfielder leaders

In baseball statistics, an error is an act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to advance one or more bases or allows an at bat to continue after the batter should have been put out.

An outfielder is a person playing in one of the three defensive positions in baseball, farthest from the batter. These defenders are the left fielder, the center fielder, and the right fielder. An outfielder's duty is to try to catch long fly balls before they hit the ground or to quickly catch or retrieve and return to the infield any other balls entering the outfield. Outfielders normally play behind the six other members of the defense who play in or near the infield. By convention, each of the nine defensive positions in baseball is numbered. The outfield positions are 7 (left field), 8 (center field) and 9 (right field). These numbers are shorthand designations useful in baseball scorekeeping and are not necessarily the same as the squad numbers worn on player uniforms.

Tom Brown is the all-time leader in errors committed by an outfielder with 492 career. Brown is the only outfielder to commit more than 400 career errors. Dummy Hoy (394), Paul Hines (385), Jesse Burkett (383), George Gore (368), Jimmy Ryan (366), George Van Haltren (358), and Ned Hanlon (350) are the only other outfielders to commit more than 300 career errors.

Milwaukee Grays

The Milwaukee Grays were a short-lived baseball team that spent one year, 1878, in the National League.

The team was part of the League Alliance, loosely affiliated with the National League, in 1877. It won 19 games and lost 13 (including a 10-7 loss to the Chicago White Stockings of the NL), ending up in fourth place. "The team's sharp style and strong hometown support won them a National League berth in 1878."They won 15 games and lost 45 in 1878, finishing sixth and last in the league. Their home games were played at Eclipse Park II.

The Grays were managed by former major league right fielder Jack Chapman, whose nickname was "Death to Flying Things." Their best hitter was left fielder Abner Dalrymple, who led the team in batting average (.354), slugging percentage (.421), runs (52), and doubles (10). Their top pitcher was Sam Weaver, who was only 12-31 but had the fourth-best ERA in the league, a very low 1.95.

Milwaukee Grays all-time roster

The following is a list of players and who appeared in at least one game for the Milwaukee Grays franchise of the National League in 1878.

Paul Hines

Paul Aloysius Hines (March 1, 1855 – July 10, 1935) was an American center fielder in professional baseball who played in the National Association and Major League Baseball from 1872 to 1891. Born in Virginia, he is credited with winning baseball's first triple crown in 1878; the accomplishment was not noted at the time, as runs batted in would not be counted until years later, home runs were rare and home run leadership obscure, and Abner Dalrymple was then erroneously recognized as the batting champion. There is some controversy over whether Hines was also the first player to turn an unassisted triple play, since it was an 8-8-4 Triple Play.

Hines probably practiced with the original Washington Nationals or played on its junior team before joining the National Association with that club in 1872. When the original Chicago White Stockings resumed play in 1874, the teenage Hines played every game, usually in center field. He remained with the club four seasons, including the inaugural National League championship season of 1876, and then played eight seasons for the Providence Grays from 1878 to 1885, spanning that club's entire major league association, during which the club won two pennants. After the Providence club folded in 1885, he remained an everyday major league center fielder through two seasons for a new Washington Nationals club and one for the Indianapolis Hoosiers, shifting to first base for a second Indianapolis season in 1889. He returned to center field with gradually declining playing time for the Pittsburgh Alleghenys, Boston Beaneaters and Washington Statesmen in 1890 and 1891. His last year in the major leagues was 1891, but he continued to play baseball in minor leagues. He finished his professional career splitting 1896 between the minor league teams Burlington, Iowa and Mobile, Alabama, at the age of 41.

During the first five NL seasons, from 1876 through 1880, Hines had more base hits than any other player, and he retired third to Cap Anson and Jim O'Rourke with 1,884 career hits in the majors. He also remained among the top 10 major league career home run hitters as late as 1887. His total of 16 seasons as a major league team's primary center fielder was not surpassed until Tris Speaker and Ty Cobb in 1925.

He was arrested in 1922, at the age of 65, on charges of pickpocketing. Hines died at age 80 in Hyattsville, Maryland, deaf and blind. His hearing had been impaired since 1886 after being hit in the head by a pitch.

Union Base-Ball Grounds

Union Base-Ball Grounds was a baseball park located in Chicago. The park was "very visibly downtown", its small block bounded on the west by Michigan Avenue, on the north by Randolph Street, and on the east by railroad tracks and the lake shore, which was then much closer than it is today. The site is now part of Millennium Park.

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