Abe Woodson

Abraham Benjamin Woodson (February 15, 1934 – February 8, 2014) was an American football cornerback and kick returner who played nine seasons in the National Football League, mainly with the San Francisco 49ers. He also spent two years with the St. Louis Cardinals.[1]

Abe Woodson
refer to caption
Woodson in 1964
No. 40, 42
Position:Cornerback / Return specialist
Personal information
Born:February 15, 1934
Jackson, Mississippi
Died:February 8, 2014 (aged 79)
Las Vegas, Nevada
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:188 lb (85 kg)
Career information
College:Illinois
NFL Draft:1957 / Round: 2 / Pick: 15
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • Pro Bowl (1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963)
  • All-Pro (1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963)
Career NFL statistics
Kickoff return yards:5,538
Punt return yards:956
All purpose yards:6,494
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Woodson played high school football for Austin High School in Chicago. Prior to joining the NFL, he played at the University of Illinois in football and track, setting the record for indoor 50 meters high hurdles twice and scoring three second half touchdowns against Michigan State during his time in Illinois.[2]

Career

Woodson was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers in the second round of the 1957 Draft after fulfilling a military commitment. The Niners were a year removed from being one game away from the NFL Championship Game. Unfortunately, the Niners never finished above third during Woodson's tenure, going 6-6, 7-5, 7-5, 7-6-1, 6-8, 2-12, and 4-10. He played two final seasons with St. Louis. While the Cardinals went 5-9 in 1965, they went 8-5-1 in 1966 and finished two games out of playing for the chance to go to the Super Bowl.

As a kick returner, there were few who were better. Of all kick returners in NFL history, his average of 28.7 yards per return is well ahead of any others who have returned over 5,000 yards worth of kicks. He had 193 returns for 5538 yards. He was also dangerous on punt returns, averaging 9 yards a return in his prime with the 49ers. He ranks 21st in career return yards, and his 28.7 average yards per return still ranks 4th all time. Combining his punt and kick return yards, he ranks 34th.

Post-NFL

After leaving football, he worked as a life insurance agent. He later lived in Las Vegas, where he served as a prison minister in connection with the Churches of Christ. He died on February 8, 2014, aged 79, just a week before his 80th birthday.[3]

References

  1. ^ Abe Woodson. pro-football-reference.com
  2. ^ http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2014-02-16/sports/ct-abe-woodson-spt-0216-20140216_1_bears-nfl-pro-bowl-ronnie-bull
  3. ^ Former 49ers standout Abe Woodson dies at 79 Archived 2014-03-06 at the Wayback Machine
1956 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1956 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations to the All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1956 Big Ten Conference football season.

1956 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1956 Big Ten Conference football season was the 61st season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1956 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1956 Iowa Hawkeyes football team, under head coach Forest Evashevski, won the Big Ten championship, compiled a 9–1 record, led the Big Ten in scoring defense (8.4 points allowed per game), was ranked No. 3 in the final AP Poll and in the Coaches Poll, and defeated Oregon State, 35–19, in the 1957 Rose Bowl. Quarterback Ken Ploen received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the most valuable player in the Big Ten and was also named the most valuable player in the Rose Bowl.

The 1956 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bennie Oosterbaan, compiled a 7–2 record, handed Iowa its only defeat, and was ranked No. 7 in the final AP Poll and the Coaches Poll. End Ron Kramer was a consensus first-team All-American and was the first Big Ten player selected, with the fourth overall pick, in the 1957 NFL Draft. Guard Dick Hill was selected as the team's most valuable player.

The 1956 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Duffy Daugherty, compiled a 7–2 record, was ranked No. 9 in the final AP Poll, and led the Big Ten in scoring offense with an average of 26.6 points scored per game. James Hinsley was selected as the team's most valuable player.

In the final AP Poll, five Big Ten teams finished in the top 15: Iowa (#1); Michigan (#7); Michigan State (#9); Minnesota (#12); and Ohio State (#15). The conference's individual statistical leaders included Purdue quarterback Len Dawson with 856 passing yards, Purdue halfback Melvin Dillard with 873 rushing yards, and Indiana end Brad Bomba with 407 receiving yards. Ohio State guard Jim Parker won the Outland Trophy as the best interior lineman in college football.

1956 Illinois Fighting Illini football team

The 1956 Illinois Fighting Illini football team was an American football team that represented the University of Illinois during the 1956 Big Ten Conference football season. In their 15th year under head coach Ray Eliot, the Illini compiled a 2–5–2 record and finished in a tie for seventh place in the Big Ten Conference.

1956 Michigan State Spartans football team

The 1956 Michigan State Spartans football team was an American football team that represented Michigan State University in the 1956 Big Ten Conference football season. In their third season under head coach Duffy Daugherty, the Spartans compiled a 7–2 overall record (4–2 against Big Ten Conference opponents) and were ranked No. 9 in the final AP Poll and No. 10 in the final Coaches Poll.Center John Matsko was selected by the Associated Press as a first-team player on the 1956 All-Big Ten Conference football team. The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Pat Wilson with 414 passing yards, Dennis Mendyk with 495 rushing yards, and Tony Kolodziej with 221 receiving yards.

1957 NFL Draft

The 1957 National Football League draft had its first four rounds held on November 26, 1956, at the Warwick Hotel in Philadelphia and its final twenty-six rounds on January 31, 1957 at the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel also in Philadelphia.

1960 All-Pro Team

Selectors of All-Pros for the 1960 National Football League season included the Associated Press (AP), United Press International (UPI), New York Daily News (NYDN), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and The Sporting News (SN).

1961 All-Pro Team

The Associated Press (AP), United Press International (UPI), Pro Football Illustrated (PFI), New York Daily News (NYDN), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and Sporting News (SN) were among selectors of All-Pros for the 1961 National Football League season.

1962 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1962. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1963 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press National Football League's All-Pro Team in 1963.

Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1966 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1966 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 47th season the team was in the National Football League (NFL), and the seventh in St. Louis. The team moved its home games from the old Busch Stadium to the new Busch Stadium in downtown St. Louis, and bettered their 1965 record of 5–9, winning eight games. Despite the improvement, they failed to qualify for the playoffs for the 18th consecutive season.

Austin, Chicago

Austin is one of seventy-seven officially designated community areas in Chicago, Illinois. Located on the city's West Side, it is the second largest community area by population (behind Lake View) and the second-largest geographically (behind South Deering). Austin's eastern boundary is the Belt Railway located just east of Cicero Avenue. Its northernmost border is the Milwaukee District / West Line. Its southernmost border is at Roosevelt Road from the Belt Railway west to Austin Boulevard. The northernmost portion, north of North Avenue, extends west to Harlem Avenue, abutting Elmwood Park. In addition to Elmwood Park, Austin also borders the suburbs of Cicero and Oak Park.

Austin Community Academy High School

Austin High School (now known as Austin College and Career Academy High School) is a public four-year high school located at 231 North Pine Avenue in the Austin neighborhood on the west side of Chicago, Illinois, United States. Operated by the Chicago Public Schools, Austin opened in 1876 and was named in honor of Henry W. Austin, a Chicago real estate developer In 2004, the online newsletter Chicago-Catalyst.org called it the yellow brick fortress. Austin Polytech shared its campus with two smaller schools; Austin Business & Entrepreneurship Academy High and V.O.I.S.E. Academy High School. After the 2015–2016 school year, the small schools converted into one school and was renamed Austin College and Career Academy High School.

February 15

February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 319 days remaining until the end of the year (320 in leap years).

List of Illinois Fighting Illini in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Illinois Fighting Illini football players in the NFL Draft.

List of National Football League annual kickoff return yards leaders

This is a list of National Football League kickoff returners who have led the regular season in kickoff return yards each year.

List of National Football League annual punt return yards leaders

This is a list of National Football League punt returners who have led the regular season in punt return yards each year. The record for punt return yards in a season is currently held by Desmond Howard of the Green Bay Packers who had 875 yards in 1996.

List of San Francisco 49ers players

These players have appeared in at least one regular season or postseason game for the San Francisco 49ers NFL franchise.

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