Abdulaziz al-Omari

Abdulaziz al-Omari (Arabic: عبد العزيز العمري‎, ʿAbd al-ʿAzīz al-ʿUmarī, also transliterated as Alomari or al-Umari; May 28, 1979[1] – September 11, 2001) was a Saudi airport security guard and imam who was one of five hijackers of American Airlines Flight 11 as part of the September 11 attacks.

Omari arrived in the United States in June 2001, on a tourist visa, obtained through the Visa Express program. On September 11, 2001, Omari boarded American Airlines Flight 11 and assisted in the hijacking of the plane, which was crashed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center, as part of the coordinated attacks.

Abdulaziz al-Omari
(Arabic: عبد العزيز العُمري)
Abdulaziz al-Omari
Born
Abdulaziz al-Omari

May 28, 1979
DiedSeptember 11, 2001 (aged 22)
Cause of deathDeliberate crash of American Airlines Flight 11

Early life and education

Little is known about al-Omari's life, and it is unclear whether some information refers to Omari or another person by that name. He had used the birth date May 28, 1979.

Career

He is alleged to have often served as an imam at his mosque in Saudi Arabia and is believed by American authorities to have been a student of Saudi cleric Sulaiman Al-Alwan, whose mosque is located in Al-Qassim Province.

According to Walid bin Attash, Omari was one of a group of future hijackers who provided security at Kandahar airport after their basic training at an al-Qaeda camp. During the 2000 Al Qaeda Summit in Kuala Lumpur, American authorities state that immigration records show that a person named Abdulaziz al-Omari was visiting the country, although they say they are not sure that this was the same person.

In the autumn of 2001, after the September 11 attacks, al Jazeera television broadcast a tape they claim was made by Omari. The speaker made a farewell suicide video. In it he read, "I am writing this with my full conscience and I am writing this in expectation of the end, which is near. . . God praise everybody who trained and helped me, namely the leader Sheikh Osama bin Laden."[2]

According to FBI director Robert Mueller and the 9/11 Commission, Omari entered the United States through a Dubai flight on June 29, 2001, with Salem al-Hazmi, landing in New York.[3] He had used the controversial Visa Express program to gain entry. He apparently stayed with several other hijackers in Paterson, New Jersey, before moving to his own place at 4032 57th Terrace, Vero Beach, Florida. On his rental agreement form for that house, Omari gave two license-plates authorized to park in his space, one of which was registered to Atta.[4]

Omari obtained a fake United States ID card from All Services Plus in Passaic County, New Jersey, which was in the business of selling fake documents, including another to Khalid al-Mihdhar.[5] He was married and had a daughter.

Attacks

Atta in airport
Atta (blue shirt) and Omari at Portland International Jetport on 9/11

On September 10, 2001, Mohamed Atta picked up Omari from the Milner Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts, and the two drove their rented Nissan to a Comfort Inn in South Portland, Maine, where they spent the night in room 232. It was initially reported that Adnan and Ameer Bukhari were the two hijackers who had rented and driven the car.[6]

In the early hours of September 11, they boarded a commuter flight back to Boston to connect to American Airlines Flight 11. American 11 was hijacked 15 minutes after the flight departed by Omari and four other hijackers, which allowed trained pilot Mohamed Atta to crash the Boeing 767 into the North Tower of the World Trade Center as part of an attack that killed thousands of people.

Legacy

Mistaken identity

Controversy over Omari's identity erupted shortly after the attacks. At first, the FBI had named Abdul Rahman al-Omari, a pilot for Saudi Arabian Airlines, as the pilot of Flight 11. It was quickly shown that this person was still alive, and the FBI issued an apology. It was also quickly determined that Mohamed Atta was the pilot among the hijackers. The FBI then named Abdulaziz al-Omari as a hijacker.

A man with the same name as those given by the FBI turned up alive in Saudi Arabia, saying that he had studied at the University of Denver and his passport was stolen there in 1995. The name, origin, birth date, and occupation were released by the FBI, but the picture was not of him. "I couldn't believe it when the FBI put me on their list", he said. "They gave my name and my date of birth, but I am not a suicide bomber. I am here. I am alive. I have no idea how to fly a plane. I had nothing to do with this."[7][8][9]

See also

References

  1. ^ John J. Lumpkin. "Abdul Aziz al Omari". Globalsecurity.org. Archived from the original on 2012-01-18. Retrieved 2012-01-06.
  2. ^ Unger, Craig (19 March 2004). House of Bush, House of Saud. Simon and Schuster. p. 230. ISBN 9780743266239. Archived from the original on 10 August 2016. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  3. ^ "Statement of Robert S. Mueller: Joint Investigation Into September 11: (published September 26, 2002)". Fas.org. Archived from the original on 2012-01-03. Retrieved 2012-01-06.
  4. ^ FBI Affidavit: Page 11 Archived 2007-03-18 at the Wayback Machine ABC
  5. ^ Miller, Jonathan (2003-03-08). "A Plea Deal, Then Freedom, in Terror Case Where Prosecutors Kept Evidence a Secret". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 2018-06-12. Retrieved 2008-09-29.
  6. ^ Two Brothers among Hijackers: CNN Report Archived 2005-12-21 at the Wayback Machine People's Daily
  7. ^ Sack, Kevin (2001-09-16). "AFTER THE ATTACKS: MISSED CUES; Saudi May Have Been Suspected in Error, Officials Say". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 2005-12-19.
  8. ^ Fisk, Robert (2004-06-24). "Suicide hijacker' is an airline pilot alive and well in Jeddah". Archived from the original on 2004-06-24.
  9. ^ "Middle East | Hijack 'suspects' alive and well". BBC News. 2001-09-23. Archived from the original on 2015-07-30. Retrieved 2012-01-06.

External links

1998–99 Qatar Stars League

Statistics of Qatar Stars League in season 1998/1999.

Ahmed al-Ghamdi

Ahmed Salah Said al-Ghamdi (Arabic: احمد صلاة سعيد الغامدي‎, Aḥmad Ṣalāt Sa‘īd al-Ghāmdī, also transliterated as Alghamdi) (July 2, 1979 – September 11, 2001) was one of five hijackers of United Airlines Flight 175 as part of the September 11 attacks.Ghamdi was born in Saudi Arabia in 1979. He dropped out of school to fight in Chechnya and was probably sent to train in al-Qaeda camps in Afghanistan where he would be chosen by Osama bin Laden to participate in the terrorist attacks in America.

He arrived in the United States in May 2001 on a tourist visa and helped plan out how the attacks would take place. On September 11, 2001, he boarded United Airlines Flight 175 and assisted in the hijacking of the plane so that lead hijacker and trained pilot Marwan al-Shehhi could take over the plane and crash it into the South Tower of the World Trade Center, as part of the coordinated attacks.

Ahmed al-Haznawi

Ahmed Ibrahim al-Haznawi (Arabic: احمد ابراهيم الحزناوي‎, Aḥmad Ibrāhīm al-Ḥaznāwī) (October 11, 1980 – September 11, 2001) was one of four hijackers of United Airlines Flight 93 as part of the September 11 attacks.

He left his family to fight in Chechnya in 2000 but was probably sent to training camps in Afghanistan. It was there he was chosen to participate in the 9/11 attacks. He arrived in the United States in June 2001 under the direction of Al-Qaeda for terrorist attacks, on a tourist visa. Once he was in the U.S., he settled in Florida and helped plan out how the attacks would take place.

On September 11, 2001, Haznawi boarded United Airlines Flight 93 and assisted in the hijacking of the plane, which crashed into a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, after a passenger uprising.

Ahmed al-Nami

Ahmed bin Abdullah al-Nami (Arabic: أحمد بن عبد الله النعمي, Aḥmad bin ‘Abdullāh an-Nāmī; also transliterated as Alnami; August 17, 1977 – September 11, 2001) was one of four hijackers of United Airlines Flight 93 as part of the September 11 attacks.

Born in Saudi Arabia, Nami had served as a muezzin and was a college student. He left his family in 2000 to complete the Hajj, but later went to Afghanistan bound for an al-Qaeda training camp where he befriended other future hijackers and would soon be chosen to participate in the attacks.

He arrived in the United States in May 2001, on a tourist visa, where he would settle in Florida up until the attacks. On September 11, 2001, Nami boarded United 93 and assisted in the hijacking of the plane, which crashed into a field in rural Shanksville, Pennsylvania, after a passenger uprising, due to the passengers receiving information from their families of the three other hijacked planes that hit the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

Fayez Banihammad

Fayez Rashid Ahmed Hassan al-Qadi Banihammad (Arabic: فايز راشد احمد حسن القاضي بني حماد‎, Fāyaz Rāshid Aḥmad Ḥassan al-Qāḍī Banī Ḥammad) (March 19, 1977 – September 11, 2001) was one of five hijackers aboard United Airlines Flight 175 as part of the September 11 attacks.

Born in the United Arab Emirates, Banihammad left his family to pursue relief work. Using the Visa Express program, Banihammad obtained a U.S. tourist visa.

Banihammad arrived in the United States in June 2001. On September 11, 2001, Banihammad boarded United Airlines Flight 175 and participated in the hijacking of the plane, so it could be flown into the South Tower of the World Trade Center.

Faysal Galab

Faysal Galab is a Yemeni-American who grew up in the suburbs of Buffalo, New York. In 2002, he was arrested as part of the War on Terror together with the other members of the "Lackawanna Six", based on the fact the group of friends had attended an Afghan training camp together years earlier. Along with the others he was convicted of "providing support or resources to a foreign terrorist organization", and received a seven-year sentence.

Hamza al-Ghamdi

Hamza al-Ghamdi (Arabic: حمزة الغامدي‎, Ḥamzah al-Ghāmdī, also transliterated as Alghamdi) (November 18, 1980 – September 11, 2001) was one of five hijackers of United Airlines Flight 175 as part of the September 11 attacks.

Born in Saudi Arabia, Hamza left his family to fight in Chechnya and was probably sent to al-Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan where he was chosen to participate in the 9/11 attacks.

He arrived in the United States in May 2001 on a tourist visa. On September 11, 2001, Hamza boarded United Airlines Flight 175 and hijacked the plane along with four other terrorists so that the plane could be crashed into the South Tower of the World Trade Center.

Hijackers in the September 11 attacks

The hijackers in the September 11 attacks were 19 men affiliated with al-Qaeda. Fifteen of the 19 were citizens of Saudi Arabia, and the others were from the United Arab Emirates (2), Egypt, and Lebanon. The hijackers were organized into four teams, each led by a pilot-trained hijacker with three or four "muscle hijackers," who were trained to help subdue the pilots, passengers, and crew.

The first hijackers to arrive in the United States were Khalid al-Mihdhar and Nawaf al-Hazmi, who settled in San Diego County, California, in January 2000. They were followed by three hijacker-pilots, Mohamed Atta, Marwan al-Shehhi, and Ziad Jarrah in mid-2000 to undertake flight training in South Florida. The fourth hijacker-pilot, Hani Hanjour, arrived in San Diego in December 2000. The rest of the "muscle hijackers" arrived in early- and mid-2001.

Khaled Abu el-Dahab

An Egyptian medical student, Khaled Abu el-Dahab (Abul-Dahab) was arrested and convicted of terrorism. He is alleged to have been a right-hand man to Ali Mohamed, who had been an American CIA agent and Special Forces soldier.

Ali Mohamed travelled north from California with el-Dehab, who later told Egyptian interrogators he had withdrawn US$3,000 from a Californian bank account on orders of Osama bin Laden himself, to offer as bail money to lawyer Phil Rankin. The pair hoped to have Essam Marzouk released and possibly smuggle him into the United States.In 2002, Abul-Dahab confessed to Egyptian interrogators that he had funded the 1995 attack on the Egyptian Embassy in Pakistan on orders from bin Laden, and had transferred money from a Californian bank account to Pakistan to finance the attack.

Majed Moqed

A former law student, Majed Mashaan Ghanem Moqed (Arabic: ماجد مشعان موقد‎, Mājad Mashaʼān Mūqad; also transliterated as Moqued) (June 18, 1977 – September 11, 2001) was one of five hijackers of American Airlines Flight 77 as part of the September 11 attacks.

A Saudi, Moqed was studying law at a university in Saudi Arabia before joining Al-Qaeda in 1999 and being chosen to participate in the 9/11 attacks. He arrived in the United States in May 2001 and helped with the planning of how the attacks would be carried out.

On September 11, 2001, Moqed boarded American Airlines Flight 77 and assisted in the hijacking of the plane so that it could be crashed into the Pentagon.

Mohamed Atta's Nissan

A 2001 Nissan Altima, 1N4DL01D81C212547 is the VIN of a blue rental car belonging to Alamo Rent a Car, that was found in the Portland International Jetport parking lot, following the September 11, 2001 attacks. It was issued a Massachusetts license plate 3335 VI.

While it was initially reported that Adnan and Ameer Bukhari had rented and driven the car, the accepted story is now that Mohamed Atta rented the car, although later reports continued to suggest that Adnan Bukhari fell under suspicion because of documents found within the car.

The car had been rented from the Logan International Airport terminal in Boston, Massachusetts by Atta at 6:08pm Sunday, September 9. He provided his address of 10001 W Atlantic Boulevard in Coral Springs, Florida, where he is believed to have stayed in room #122. He listed his phone number as 954-815-3004, a number also associated with Fayez Banihammad. He used his Visa card ending in 7778 to pay for the rental.According to the Associated Press story on September 13, the same Boston terminal had also rented Atta the Mitsubishi sedan seized at Logan Airport.Atta is thought to have picked up Abdulaziz al-Omari on September 10, and the two of them drove it to a Comfort Inn in South Portland, Maine, where they spent the night in room 232. At 8:31pm, the car was photographed with two occupants at a KeyBank drive-thru ATM at 445 Gorham Road in South Portland.According to parking receipts found in the car, it arrived at the Portland International Jetport at 5:40am on September 11, and was parked on the first level. After checking in at 5:43, and passing security and an x-ray machine at 5:45, Atta and Omari are believed to have taken the 6:20 Colgan Air Flight 5930 to Boston.

Officials became aware of the car around 11pm on September 11, and by 3:30am on September 12, the car was the subject of a search warrant issued to FBI agent James Lechner, and taken by a flatbed truck to a crime lab in Augusta, Maine. The warrant was sealed until October 4.

Mohand al-Shehri

Mohand Muhammed Fayiz al-Shehri (Arabic: مهند الشهري‎, Muhand ash-Shehrī; also transliterated as Alshehri) (May 7, 1979 – September 11, 2001) was one of five hijackers aboard United Airlines Flight 175 as part of the September 11 attacks. Despite his name, he was not related to Wail al-Shehri nor Waleed al-Shehri, brothers who boarded American Airlines Flight 11 to hijack it as part of the attacks.

A Saudi, Shehri was a former college student who dropped out after failing his courses. He later left his home to fight in Chechnya in 2000, but was probably diverted to Al-Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan. It was during that time that he would be chosen to take part in the attacks in America. He received a U.S. student visa in October 2000.

Shehri arrived in the United States in May 2001. On September 11, 2001, Shehri boarded United Airlines Flight 175 and assisted in its hijacking so that it could be flown into the South Tower of the World Trade Center.

Raed Hijazi

Born in California, Raed Hijazi was one of four men, along with Mohamad Elzahabi, Nabil al-Marabh and Bassam Kanj, who met each other at the Khalden training camp during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. Although the four men each went their separate ways following the war, in 1998 they were all working as cab drivers in Boston, Massachusetts, the first three were working for the same company.He was roommates with Nabil al-Marabh for at least two months in Boston while they both worked as cab drivers.He was convicted in Jordan of planning attacks on or near January 1, 2000 within the country.

Sahim Alwan

Sahim Alwan is a Yemeni-American who grew up in the suburbs of Buffalo, New York. In 2002, he was arrested and charged as part of the War on Terror together with the other members of the "Lackawanna Six", based on the fact the group of friends had attended an Afghan training camp together years earlier.Like the others, although initially entering a plea of "not guilty", he eventually pleaded guilty to "providing material support or resources to a foreign terrorist organization". He was convicted and received a 9.5-year sentence.

Satam al-Suqami

Satam Muhammed Abdel Rahman al-Suqami (Arabic: سطام السقامي‎, Saṭām as-Suqāmī) (June 28, 1976 – September 11, 2001) was a Saudi law student and one of five hijackers of American Airlines Flight 11 as part of the September 11 attacks.

Suqami had been a law student until he was recruited into al-Qaeda along with Majed Moqed, another hijacker, and traveled to Afghanistan where he would be chosen to participate in the 9/11 attacks.

He arrived in the United States in April 2001. On September 11, 2001, Suqami boarded American Airlines Flight 11 and participated in the hijacking of the plane so that it could be crashed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center as part of the coordinated attacks.

Shafal Mosed

Shafal Mosed is a Yemeni-American who grew up in the suburbs of Buffalo, New York. In 2002, he was arrested and charged as part of the War on Terror together with the other members of the "Lackawanna Six", based on the fact the group of friends had attended an Afghan training camp together years earlier.

Wail al-Shehri

Wail Mohammed al-Shehri (Arabic: وائل الشهري‎, Wāīl ash-Shehrī; also transliterated as Alshehri) (July 31, 1973 – September 11, 2001) was one of five hijackers of American Airlines Flight 11, which was hijacked and flown into the North Tower of the World Trade Center as part of the September 11 attacks.

Shehri was an elementary school teacher from Khamis Mushait in the Asir region of Saudi Arabia. In early 2000, he traveled to Medina to seek treatment for mental problems. He and his younger brother Waleed traveled to Afghanistan in March 2000 and joined an Al-Qaeda training camp. The brothers were chosen, along with others from the same region of Saudi Arabia, to participate in the September 11 attacks. Once selected, Shehri returned to Saudi Arabia in October 2000 to obtain a clean passport, then returned to Afghanistan. In March 2001, he recorded his last will and testament on video.

Shehri arrived in the United States in early June 2001, staying in budget motels in the Boynton Beach area of south Florida. On September 5, 2001, Shehri traveled to Boston and checked into a motel with his brother. Six days later, Shehri arrived early in the morning at Boston's Logan International Airport and boarded American Airlines Flight 11. Fifteen minutes after take off, Shehri along with his brother Waleed and 3 others hijacked and deliberately crashed the airliner into the North Tower of the World Trade Center at 8:46 a.m.

In the aftermath of the attacks, some news reports mistakenly reported Shehri as a trained pilot and son of a Saudi diplomat, who was still alive and well. The Shehri family in Khamis Mushait spoke to the media, denying those early reports, saying that the Shehri brothers had disappeared and have not been heard from since.

Waleed al-Shehri

Waleed Mohammed al-Shehri (Arabic: وليد الشهري‎, Walīd ash-Shehrī, also transliterated as Alshehri) (December 20, 1978 – September 11, 2001) was one of five hijackers of American Airlines Flight 11, which was crashed into the North Tower of the World Trade Center as part of the September 11 attacks in 2001.

Born in Saudi Arabia, Shehri had been a student until he accompanied his mentally ill brother to Medina. He later went to fight in Chechnya along with his brother Wail, but was redirected to Afghanistan, where he was recruited for the attacks.

Shehri arrived in the United States in April 2001 on a tourist visa. On September 11, 2001, Waleed along with his brother, Wail, boarded American Airlines Flight 11 and was one of five that helped hijack it, so that Mohamed Atta could fly the plane into the North Tower of the World Trade Center.

Yahya Goba

Yahya Goba is a Yemeni-American who grew up in the suburbs of Buffalo, New York. In 2002, he was arrested and charged as part of the War on Terror together with the other members of the "Lackawanna Six", based on the fact that he and a group of friends had attended an Afghan training camp together years earlier.

American Airlines Flight 11
United Airlines Flight 175
American Airlines Flight 77
United Airlines Flight 93
20th hijacker suspects
United States Alleged militants in the War on Terror who have lived in United States
September 11 attacks
Buffalo Six
al-Qaeda/al-Jihad
Boston cab drivers
Portland Seven
Arrested in 2005
and convicted
Liberty City Seven
2007 Fort Dix plot
D.C. Five
Held at Guantanamo Bay
Others
Related articles

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.