Abdul Qadir Gilani

ʿAbd al-Qādir Gīlānī, (Persian: عبدالقادر گیلانی‎, formally Muḥyī l-Dīn Abū Muḥammad b. Abū Sālih ʿAbd al-Qādir al-Gīlānī al-Ḥasanī wa'l-Ḥusaynī (Arabic: عبدالقادر الجيلاني‎, Turkish: Abdülkâdir Geylânî, Kurdish: Evdilqadirê Geylanî‎, Sorani Kurdish: عه‌بدوالقادری گه‌یلانی‎),[3] known as for short was a Hanbali Sunni Muslim preacher, orator, ascetic, mystic, sayyid, faqīh, and theologian[3] who was known for being the eponymous founder of the Qadiriyya tariqa (Sufi order) of Sufism.[3]

Born 29 Sha'ban 470 AH (around 1077) in the town of Na'if, district of Gilan-e Gharb, Gilan, Iran[4][nb 1] and died Monday, February 14, 1166 (11 Rabi' al-Thani 561 AH), in Baghdad,[5] (1077–1166 CE), was a Persian[4] Hanbali Sunni[1][2] jurist and sufi based in Baghdad. The Qadiriyya tariqa is named after him.[6] And say that he was born in Gilan Iraq, a historic village near the cities (Al-Mada'in) of 40 kilometers south of Baghdad, as evidenced by historical studies academic and adopted by the Gilan Family in Baghdad.[7]

ʿAbd al-Qādir al-Gīlānī
عبدالقادر الجيلاني
Abdul-Qadir Gilani's name in Arabic calligraphy
ʿAbd al-Qādir al-Gīlānī in Arabic calligraphy.
TitleShaykh al-Islam
Personal
Born17 March 1078 CE
(1 Ramadan, 470 AH)
Gilan Province, present-day Iran
Died21 February 1166 CE
(11 Rabi' al-Thani, 561 AH)
Baghdad, Iraq
Resting placeBaghdad, Iraq
ReligionIslam
ChildrenAbdul Razzaq Gilani
EraIslamic Golden Age
RegionBaghdad
DenominationSunni
JurisprudenceHanbali[1][2]
CreedTraditionalist (Athari)
Main interest(s)Fiqh, Sufism, aqidah
TariqaQadiriyya (founder)

Name

The name Muhiyudin describes him as a "reviver of religion".[8] Gilan (Arabic al-Jilani) refers to his place of birth, Gilan.[9][10] However, Gilani also carried the epithet Baghdadi.[11][12][13] referring to his residence and burial in Baghdad. He is also called al-Hasani wa'l-Husayni, which indicates a claim to lineal descent from both Hasan ibn Ali and Husayn ibn Ali.

Paternal heritage

Gilani's father was from Sayyid lineage.[14][15] He was respected as a saint by the people of his day, and was known as Jangi Dost "who loves God", thus "Jangidost" was his sobriquet.[16][17][18]

Education

Gilani spent his early life in Gilan, the town of his birth. In 1095, at the age of eighteen years, he went to Baghdad. There, he pursued the study of Hanbali law [19] under Abu Saeed Mubarak Makhzoomi and ibn Aqil.[20] He was given lessons on Hadith by Abu Muhammad Ja'far al-Sarraj.[20] His Sufi spiritual instructor was Abu'l-Khair Hammad ibn Muslim al-Dabbas.[21] (A detailed description of his various teachers and subjects are included below). After completing his education, Gilani left Baghdad. He spent twenty-five years as a reclusive wanderer in the desert regions of Iraq.[22]

Education in Baghdad

At the age of 18, Gilani went to Baghdad to study the Hanbali school of fiqh.

Subject Shaykh (Teacher)
Fiqh (Islamic Jurisprudence) Ibn Aqil
Fiqh (Islamic Jurisprudence) Abu Al Hasan Muhammad ibn Qazi Abu Yala
Fiqh (Islamic Jurisprudence) Abu Al Khatab Mahfuz Hanbali
Fiqh (Islamic Jurisprudence) Muhammad ibn Al Husnayn
Fiqh (Islamic Jurisprudence) Abu Saeed Mubarak Makhrami
Tasawwuf (Sufism) Abu Saeed Mubarak Makhrami

Abu'l-Khair Hammad ibn Muslim al-Dabbas

Abu Zakariya ibn Yahya ibn Ali Al Tabrezi

Hadith Abu Bakr ibn Muzaffar
Hadith Muhammad Ibn Al Hasan Baqalai Abu Sayeed

Muhammad ibn Abdul Kareem

Hadith Abu Al Ghanaem Muhammad Ibn Muhammad Ali Ibn Maymoon Al Farsi
Hadith Abu Bakr Ahmad Ibn Al Muzaffar
Hadith Abu Jafer Ibn Ahmad Ibn Al Hussain Al Qari
Hadith Abu Al Qasim Ali Ibn Muhammad Ibn Banaan Al Karkhi
Hadith Abu Talib Abdul Qadri Ibn Muhammad Yusuf
Hadith Abdul Rahman Ibn Ahmad Abu Al Barkat Hibtaallah Ibn Al Mubarak
Hadith Abu Al Nasr Ibn Il Mukhtar
Hadith Abu Nasr Muhammad
Hadith Abu Ghalib Ahmad
Hadith Abu Abdullah Aulad Ali Al Bana
Hadith Abu Al Hasan Al Mubarak Ibn Al Teyvari
Hadith Abu Mansur Abdurahman Al Taqrar

[23]

Later life

In 1127, Gilani returned to Baghdad and began to preach to the public.[24] He joined the teaching staff of the school belonging to his own teacher, al-Mazkhzoomi, and was popular with students. In the morning he taught hadith and tafsir, and in the afternoon he held discourse on the science of the heart and the virtues of the Quran. He was said to have been a convincing preacher and converted numerous Jews and Christians. His strength came in the reconciling of the mystical nature of Sufism and strict nature of the Law.[24]

Death and burial

Gilani died in the evening of Tuesday, February 21, 1166 (11th Rabi' al-thani 561 AH) at the age of ninety one years according to the Islamic calendar.[5] His body was entombed in a shrine within his madrasa in Babul-Sheikh, Rusafa on the east bank of the Tigris in Baghdad, Iraq.[25][26][27] During the reign of the Safavid Shah Ismail I, Gilani's shrine was destroyed.[28] However, in 1535, the Ottoman Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent had a turba (dome) built over the shrine, which exists to this day.[29]

Birthday and death anniversary celebration

1 Ramadan is celebrated as the birthday of Abdul Qadir Gilani while the death anniversary is on 11 Rabi us Thani though some scholars and traditions say 29 Shaban and 17 Rabi us Sani as birth and death day respectively. The later is called in the subcontinent as Giyarwee Shareef or Honoured Day of 11th.[30]

Tomb of Abdul Qadir Jilani, Baghdad
Tomb Of Sheikh Abdul Qadir, Baghdad, Iraq.

Books

  • Kitab Sirr al-Asrar wa Mazhar al-Anwar[31] (The Book of the Secret of Secrets and the Manifestation of Light)

See also

Bibliography

  • Sayings of Shaikh Abd al-Qadir al-Jīlānī Malfūzāt, Holland, Muhtar (translator). S. Abdul Majeed & Co, Kuala Lumpur (1994) ISBN 1-882216-03-2.
  • Fifteen letters, khamsata ashara maktūban / Shaikh Abd Al-Qādir Al-Jīlānī. Translated from Persian to Arabic by Alī usāmu ́D-Dīn Al-Muttaqī. Translated from Arabic into English by Muhtar Holland.
  • Kamsata ašara maktūban. First edition. ʿAlāʾ al-Dīn, ʿAlī B., ʿAbd al-Malik al- Muttaqī al-Hindī (about 1480–1567) and Muhtar Holland (1935–). Al-Baz publications, Hollywood, Florida. (1997) ISBN 1-882216-16-4.
  • Jalā Al-Khawātir: a collection of forty-five discourses of Shaikh Abd Al-Qādir Al-Jīlānī, the removal of cares. Chapter 23, pg 308. Jalā al-Khawātir, Holland, Muhtar (1935–) (translator). Al-Baz publications, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. (1997) ISBN 1-882216-13-X.
  • The sultan of the saints: mystical life and teachings of Shaikh Syed Abdul Qadir Jilani / Muhammad Riaz Qadiri Qadiri, Muhammad Riyaz. Gujranwala, Abbasi publications. (2000) ISBN 969-8510-16-8.
  • The sublime revelation: al-Fath ar-Rabbānī, a collection of sixty-two discourses / Abd al-Qādir al- Jīlānī, Second edition. al-Rabbānī, al-Fath. Al-Baz publications, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. (1998). ISBN 1-882216-02-4.
  • Al-Ghunya li-talibi tariq al-haqq wa al-din, (Sufficient provision for seekers of the path of truth and religion), Parts one and two in Arabic. Al-Qadir, Abd, Al-Gaylani. Dar Al-Hurya, Baghdad, Iraq, (1988).
  • Al-Ghunya li-talibi tariq al-haqq wa al-din, (Sufficient provision for seekers of the path of truth and religion.) in Arabic. Introduced by Al-Kilani, Majid Irsan. Dar Al-Khair, Damascus, Bairut, (2005).
  • Encyclopædia Iranica, Bibliotheca Persica PresS, ISBN 1-56859-050-4.
  • Geography of the Baz Ahhab second reading in the biography of Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jilani, and the birthplace of his birth according to the methodology of scientific research (MA in Islamic History from Baghdad University in 2001) of Iraqi researcher Jamal al-Din Faleh Kilani, review and submission of the historian Emad Abdulsalam Rauf،Publishe Dar Baz Publishing, United States of America, 2016, translated by Sayed Wahid Al-Qadri Aref.

Notes

  1. ^ There is uncertainty as to the year of his birth; some sources say 1077, others 1078، He was born in Nif, a city in Persia part of today's Gilan Province of Iran.'Abd al-Qadir al-Jilani at Encyclopædia Britannica

References

  1. ^ a b John Renard, The A to Z of Sufism. p 142. ISBN 081086343X
  2. ^ a b Juan Eduardo Campo, Encyclopedia of Islam, p. 288. ISBN 1438126964
  3. ^ a b c Abdul Qadir Gilani at Encyclopædia Iranica
  4. ^ a b W. Braune, Abd al-Kadir al-Djilani, The Encyclopaedia of Islam, Vol. I, ed. H.A.R Gibb, J.H.Kramers, E. Levi-Provencal, J. Schacht, (Brill, 1986), 69;".. all authorities are unanimous in stating that he was a Persian from Nayf (Nif) in Djilan, south of the Caspian Sea."
  5. ^ a b The works of Shaykh Umar Eli of Somalia of al-Tariqat al-Qadiriyyah.
  6. ^ "Sufism, Sufis, and Sufi Orders: Sufism's Many Paths". islam.uga.edu. Retrieved 2017-07-21.
  7. ^ Book: Geography of the Baz Al-Ashhab, Achieving the Birthplace of Sheikh Abdul Qadir Al-Kilani, Dr. Jamal Al-Din Faleh Al-Kilani,(MA in Islamic History from Baghdad University in 2001) Al-Jalis Library, Beirut, 2012, p. 14
  8. ^ Mihr-e-munīr: biography of Hadrat Syed Pīr Meher Alī Shāh pg 21, Muhammad Fādil Khān, Faid Ahmad. Sajjadah Nashinan of Golra Sharif, Islamabad (1998).
  9. ^ Encyclopaedia of religion and ethics: volume 1. (A – Art). Part 1. (A – Algonquins) pg 10. Hastings, James and Selbie, John A. Adamant Media corporation. (2001), "and he was probably of Persian origin."
  10. ^ The Sufi orders in Islam, 2nd edition, pg 32. Triingham, J. Spencer and Voll, John O. Oxford University Press US, (1998), "The Hanafi Qadirriya is also included since 'Abd al-Qadir, of Persian origin was contemporary of the other two."
  11. ^ Devotional Islam and politics in British India: Ahmad Riza Khan Barelwi and his movement, 1870–1920, pg 144, Sanyal, Usha Oxford University Press US, 19 August 1999. ISBN 0-19-564862-5 ISBN 978-0-19-564862-1.
  12. ^ Cultural and religious heritage of India: Islam pg 321. Sharma, Suresh K. (2004)
  13. ^ Indo-iranica pg 7. The Iran Society, Calcutta, India. (1985).
  14. ^ Historical and political who's who of Afghanistan. p 177. Adamec, Ludwig W. (1975)
  15. ^ Qādrī, Muḥammad Riyāz̤ (2000-01-01). The Sultan of the Saints: Mystical Life and Teaching of Shaikh Syed Abdul Qadir Jilani. Abbasi Pablications. p. 19. ISBN 9789698510169.
  16. ^ "Sulook organisation website" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-28. Retrieved 2010-02-19.
  17. ^ Mihr-e-munīr: biography of Hadrat Syed Pīr Meher Alī Shāh pg 27, Khān, Muhammad Fādil and Ahmad, Faid. Sajjadah Nashinan of Golra Sharif, Islamabad. (1997)
  18. ^ Encyclopaedia of Sufism, volume 1, Kahn, Masood Ali and Ram, S.
  19. ^ Campo, Juan Eduardo (2009-01-01). Encyclopedia of Islam. Infobase Publishing. p. 4. ISBN 9781438126968.
  20. ^ a b Gibb, H.A.R.; Kramers, J.H.; Levi-Provencal, E.; Schacht, J. (1986) [1st. pub. 1960]. Encyclopaedia of Islam (New Edition). Volume I (A-B). Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. p. 69. ISBN 978-9004081147.
  21. ^ Malise Ruthven, Islam in the World, p 243. ISBN 0195305035
  22. ^ Esposito J. L. The Oxford dictionary of Islam. p160. ISBN 0199757267
  23. ^ Akbar, pg.11 Al Haqq, Abd. and Ghunyat al-talibeen (Wealth for Seekers) pg. 12 Urdu version
  24. ^ a b 'Abd al-Qadir al-Jilani at Encyclopædia Britannica
  25. ^ Al-Ghunya li-talibi tariq al-haqq wa al-din (Sufficient provision for seekers of the path of truth and religion), parts one and two in Arabic, Al-Qadir, Abd and Al-Gilani. Dar Al-Hurya, Baghdad, Iraq, (1988).
  26. ^ Al-Ghunya li-talibi tariq al-haqq wa al-din (Sufficient provision for seekers of the path of truth and religion) with introduction by Al-Kilani, Majid Irsan. Al-Kilani, Majid, al-Tariqat, 'Ursan, and al-Qadiriyah, Nash'at
  27. ^ "The Qadirya Mausoleum" (PDF).
  28. ^ A.A. Duri, Baghdad, The Encyclopaedia of Islam, Vol. I, 903.
  29. ^ W. Braune, Abd al-Kadir al-Djilani, The Encyclopaedia of Islam, Vol. I, 70.
  30. ^ "Ghousia".
  31. ^ "Sirr-ul-Asrar". www.nafseislam.com. Retrieved 2016-08-04.

External links

Abd al-Karīm al-Jīlī

Abd al-Karīm al-Jīlī, or Abdul Karim Jili (Arabic:عبدالكريم جيلى) was a Muslim Sufi saint and mystic who was born in 1365, in what is modern day Iraq, possibly in the neighborhood of Jil in Baghdad. He is famous in Muslim mysticism as the author of Universal Man.

Jili was a descendant of the sufi saint Abdul Qadir Gilani, the founder of the Qadiriyya dervish order. Although little is known about his life, historians have noted that Jili travelled in various places around the world. He wrote more than twenty books, of which Universal Man is the best known.

Jili was the foremost systematizer and one of the greatest exponents of the work of Ibn Arabi. Universal Man is an explanation of Ibn Arabi’s teachings on the structure of reality and human perfection. Since it was written, it has been held up as one of the masterpieces of Sufi literature. Jili conceived of the Absolute Being as a Self, a line of thinking which later influenced the 20th century Muslim philosopher and poet Allama Iqbal.

Abdul Qadir Gillani

Syed Abdul Qadir Gilani is a Pakistani politician who had been a member of the National Assembly of Pakistan from July 2012 to 2013. Previously he had been a member of the Provincial Assembly of the Punjab from June 2008 to July 2012.

Abdul Razzaq Gilani

ʿAbd al-Razzāq b. ʿAbd al-Qādir al-Jīlānī (c. Dhu al-Qi'dah 528 AH – 6 Shawwal 603 AH/9 September 1134 – 7 May 1207), also known as Abū Bakr al-Jīlī or ʿAbd al-Razzāq al-Jīlānī (often simplified as Abdul-Razzaq Gilani) for short, or reverentially as Shaykh ʿAbd al-Razzāq al-Jīlānī by Sunni Muslims, was a Persian Sunni Muslim Hanbali theologian, jurist, traditionist, and Sufi mystic based in Baghdad. As the son and spiritual heir of the renowned jurist and mystic Abdul-Qadir Gilani (d. 1166), the founder of the Qadiriyya order of Sunni mysticism, Abdul-Razzaq Gilani received his initial training in all the traditional Islamic sciences under his forebear, prior to setting out "on his own to attend the lectures of other prominent Hanbali scholars" in his region. Abdul-Razzaq is sometimes given the Arabic honorary epithet Tāj al-Dīn (Crown of the Religion) in Sunni tradition, due to his reputation as an outstanding jurisconsult and mystic of the Hanbali school.

Dastgeer Sahib

Dastgeer Sahib is a Sufi shrine located in Khanyar, Srinagar, Jammu and kashmir, India.

Gilani

Gilani or Gillani is a Gilaki surname, originating from the Gilan Province. Notable people with the surname (or variants) include:

Sayyed Abdul-Qadir Gilani (1077–1166), 12th century Muslim Saint, Scholar and Author of books on spirituality

Sayyed Abd Al-Rahman Al-Gilani (1841–1927), first Prime Minister of Iraq in 1920

Ahmed Gailani Afghan politician (born 1932)

Baqa Jilani (1911–1941), early 20th century cricketer from the Punjab

Benjamin Gilani (born 1946), Indian theatre and television actor

Abdul Qader al-Keilani (1874–1948), early 20th century Syrian statesman and religious authority

Haji Gilani (died 2003), participant in the 2001 Afghan war

Hamid Raza Gilani, Pakistani politician

Imtiaz Gilani (born 1947), Pakistani engineer and academic

Kamel al-Kilani (born 1958), minister in the Iraqi Interim Council

Maulana Manazir Ahsan Gilani, 19th century philosopher

Mian Ghulam Jilani (1914–2004), critic of the Bhutto government

Mohammad Mohammadi Gilani (born 1928), Iranian cleric and religious authority

Mubarak Ali Gilani, Hanafi, Qadiri sheikh

Rashid Ali al-Gaylani (1892–1965), Prime Minister of Iraq in 1933 and 1941

Syeda Sarwat Gilani (born 1982), Pakistani actress and model

Syed Ali Shah Geelani, separatist leader, important member of the All Parties Hurriyat Conference

Sayed Ishaq Gailani (born 1954), Afghan Politician

Syed Mumtaz Alam Gillani (born 1940), Pakistani lawyer and politician

Syed Yousaf Raza Gillani (born 1952), Prime Minister of Pakistan from March 24, 2008 to April 26, 2012

Zahed Gilani (1216–1301), 13th century leader of the Zahediyeh Sufi order

Syed Iftikhar Hussain Gillani, Pakistani Former Federal Minister for Law and Justice

Hanbali

The Hanbali school (Arabic: المذهب الحنبلي‎) is one of the four traditional Sunni Islamic schools of jurisprudence (fiqh). It is named after the Iraqi scholar Ahmad ibn Hanbal (d. 855), and was institutionalized by his students. The Hanbali madhhab is the smallest of four major Sunni schools, the others being the Hanafi, Maliki and Shafi`i.Hanbali school derives Sharia predominantly from the Quran, the Hadiths (sayings and customs of Muhammad), and the views of Sahabah (Muhammad's companions). In cases where there is no clear answer in sacred texts of Islam, the Hanbali school does not accept jurist discretion or customs of a community as a sound basis to derive Islamic law, a method that Hanafi and Maliki Sunni fiqhs accept. Hanbali school is the strict traditionalist school of jurisprudence in Sunni Islam. It is found primarily in Saudi Arabia and Qatar, where it is the official fiqh. Hanbali followers are the demographic majority in four emirates of UAE (Sharjah, Umm al-Quwain, Ras al-Khaimah and Ajman). Large minorities of Hanbali followers are also found in Bahrain, Oman and Yemen and among Iraqi and Jordanian bedouins.The Hanbali school experienced a reformation in the Wahhabi-Salafist movement. Historically the school was small; during the 18th to early-20th century Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab and Al Saud greatly aided its propagation around the world by way of their interpretation of the school's teachings. As a result of this, the school's name has become a controversial one in certain quarters of the Islamic world due to the influence he is believed by some to have had upon these teachings, which cites Ibn Hanbal as a principal influence along with the thirteenth-century Hanbali reformer Ibn Taymiyyah. However, it has been argued by certain scholars that Ibn Hanbal's own beliefs actually played "no real part in the establishment of the central doctrines of Wahhabism," as there is evidence, according to the same authors, that "the older Hanbalite authorities had doctrinal concerns very different from those of the Wahhabis," as medieval Hanbali literature is rich in references to saints, grave visitation, miracles, and relics. Historically, the Hanbali school was treated as simply another valid interpretation of Islamic law, and many prominent medieval Sufis, such as Abdul Qadir Gilani, were Hanbali jurists and mystics at the same time.

Jilala

The Jilala (جيلالة), or Tariqa Jilalia (طريقة جيلاﻟﻴـة) is an ecstatic and music-therapeutic tariqa of Morocco of Sufi origin. It should not be confused with the folk revival group Jil Jilala.

The Jilala are the oldest Moroccan Muslim confraternity, named after the Sufi master Abdul Qadir Gilani, in Morocco called Moulay Abdelkader Jilali or Boualam Jilali (Bū 'alam Jilali).The rituals of Jilala ranging the dhikr and invocation of marabouts and jinns, just like the other tranche confraternity of Morocco (Gnawa, Hmadsha and Aissawa).

The Jilala operate in small groups, usually less than five people. The musical instruments they use are the gasba flute (bamboo red flute) and bendir, those using bendir generally are also those who make the invocations and chants. When it comes to songs in honor of a type of spirits called buwwāb (black African jinn, traditionally associated to the Gnawa), some Jilala also use the krakebs, the typical large iron castanets of the Gnawa.Originally only a voice of sacred Moroccan sufism, and in their early repertoire, besides the invocation of saints and the jinn and the songs of praise of Allah, have a gripe songs of exile and death, and for this reason the musical style of this confraternity is melancholic. The Jilala Jilala music is all about throb and rasp. Throb - the acceleration and deceleration within a song, the breathy organic timbre of the gasba flutes, the in-and-out-of-phase frequencies of the paired flutes. Rasp - flutes, voices, bendirs, all buzzy. The bendir patterns inhabit the 2/4 and 6/8 universes common across Morocco, but I find the drum stroke patterns particularly loopy and provocative.They are called, behind monetary compensation, upon to exorcise evil spirits, to purify the heart and for curing to heal the sick (in particularly useful in curing cases of hysteria and depression), through the invocation of saints and spirits.

In a ritual Jilala the lila is performed. The therapy or exorcism must be repeated every year in the same period. It is thought that if the therapy is not renewed, the sick or possessed the same symptoms recur at the approach of the date corresponding to the first crisis. In the time that elapses between two lila, however, the symptoms disappear, or, at least, are kept under control.

The participants in the rituals, especially women, falling into a trance (hal), dancing wildly (jadba or jedba) to the rhythm of flutes and bendir. I fell into a trance can have different behavior, such as laughter, screams, cries. The Jilala have spread throughout Morocco (excluding Western Sahara), especially in the north and in the region of the city of Casablanca.There are similarities between the rituals of Jilala and other therapeutic-Moroccan musical groups with the phenomenon of Italian tarantism, for example the release and wild dance, the fact that the therapy has to be renewed each year, the fact that healers are musicians, and it gives a therapeutic value to the colors, the music and dance.

Khanyar

Khanyar is a locality in downtown Srinagar of Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir. It lies about 4 kilometers north from Lal Chowk. Khanyar is known for the shrines of Dastgeer Sahib which holds the relic of Abdul Qadir Gilani and Roza Bal, tomb of Yuz Asaf.

Kunta-haji

Kunta-haji Kishiev (Chechen: Киши КIант Кунт-Хьаж) (1829 or 1830 in Melcha Khi, Chechnya - 1867 in Ustyuzhna, Novgorod Gubernia, now Vologda Oblast, Russia ) was Chechen Muslim mystic, the founder of a Sufi branch named Zikrism, and an ideologue of nonviolence and passive resistance. He is often referred as the Chechen Mahatma Gandhi. A follower of the Qadiriyya Sufi order.Kunta-haji Kishiev (literally son of Kishi) was born in a Chechen lowland village of Isti-Su, also known as Melcha-Khi. Later the family moved to the mountain village of Ilskhan-Yurt in the heartland of Chechnya. In his youth he was distinguished by his hard work and sharp mental senses. Kunta received a solid religious education and was a follower of shaykh Gezi-haji from the village of Zandak. Kunta started practicing Loud Zikr: prayer with dancing, singing, rolling and recitation of divine names.

According to legend, Imam Shamil was worried by the unusual practice and ordered an examination of the Koranic knowledge of the youth. After Kunta passed the examination, Shamil left him alone. By another version of the same legend, Shamil forbade Kunta Zikr and promised to execute him if he continued. Yet another legend tells that Shamil exiled Kunta to Mekka and did not allowed to come back.By the end of 1850s Kunta made his Hajj (according to Mustafa Eldibiev (Kunta made his first hajj at the age of 18, thus, in 1848). In his travel over the Middle East Kunta not only visited Mekka but also the tomb of Abdul-Qadir Gilani in Baghdad, and became a devoted follower of Qadiriyyah, the teachings developed by Abdul-Qadir Gilani. Kunta became a strong supporter of non-violence and peace. In the midst of the bloody Caucasian War he wrote to Chechnya from Mekka:

War—it is savagery. Remove yourself from anything that hints of [reminds you of] war if the enemy hasn’t come to take away your faith and honor. Your strength is wisdom, patience, fairness. The enemy will not withstand this strength and sooner or later will admit his defeat. No one will have the strength to defeat you and your truth if you don’t turn away from the path of your faith—the Tariqah.and

Brothers! Because of the constant wars we are catastrophically diminished in numbers. I do not believe in help from Turkey, that Turkish sultan wants to free and save us. He is the same despot as Russian tsar. Believe me: I saw this by my own eyes as well as covering by sharia despots from Arab countries. Further war is not pleasing God. If they order you to go to the church - go, it is only a building. If they order you to wear crosses - wear them, they only iron things. You would still be Muslims in your heart and soul. But if they would rape your women, force you to forget your culture and traditions, only then rebel and fight to the last man.

Defeat the evil man by your goodness and love

Defeat the greedy with your generosity

Defeat the treacherous with your sincerity

Defeat the infidel with your fidelityAfter the fall of Shamil Kunta-hajji returned to Chechnya. His teaching became quite popular among people tired by the almost fifty years of the Caucasian war. The number of his murids reached five thousand. Kunta-haji required his murids not only to perform the five required prayers during the day, but also to repeat the prayer La ilaha ill-Allah (There is no god but God) at least one hundred times during the day and participate in the ritual of Loud Circular Zikr.Despite the fact that Kunta-haji repeatedly rejected the title of imam he was seen as a threat to the Imperial authorities and the official version of Islam supported by Russian authorities. By the request of the tsar's administration, official Islamic clerics (e.g. Abdulkadyr Khordayev and Mustafa Abdulayev) organized public theological discussions with Kunta-haji trying to prove that his teaching contradicted Islam. Still the influence of Kunta-haji only grew. Considering Kunta-haji as a threat the Governor-General of Terek ordered his arrest. Kunta-haji and his brother, Movsar, were arrested and taken to Novocherkassk prison in January 1863.

The arrest caused the so-called Dagger Uprising (or delo pod Shali), when three thousand of Kunta-haji's murids armed only with the ceremonial daggers tried to free their teacher in Shali. The rebels were dispersed by the regular troops of General Tumanov. 160 rebels were killed.For a long time there was no information about the fate of Kunta-haji. In 1928 documents were found confirming that Kunta-haji died in exile in the town of Ustyuzhna (then Novgorod Guberniya, now Vologda Oblast).

List of Sunni books

This is a list of significant books of Sunni Islam doctrine.

Mausoleum of Abdul-Qadir Gilani

The Mausoleum of Abdul-Qadir Gilani (Arabic: الـحَـضـرة الـقَـادريّـة‎, translit. Hazrat Qadiriyyah), is an Islamic religious complex dedicated to Abdul Qadir Gilani, the founder of the Qadiriyya Sufi order, located in Baghdad, Iraq. Its surrounding square is named as Kilani Square. The complex consists of the mosque, mausoleum, and the library known as Qadiriyya Library, which houses rare old works related to Islamic Studies.

Mohy al-Din

Mohy al-Din, (Arabic: محي الدین‎) is a male Muslim name composed of the elements Muhyi, meaning reviver and ad-Din, meaning of the faith. It may refer to

Al-Sayyid Muhiyudin Abu Muhammad Abdul-Qadir Gilani Al-Hasani Wal-Hussaini (1077–1166), Sufi religious figure.

Muhyi al-Dīn al-Maghribī (1220–1283), Spanish-born Arab astronomer

Muhi Al-Din Lari (died 1526), Indian or Persian miniaturist and writer.

Muhi ud-din Muhammad Aurangzeb Bahadur Alamgir, (1618–1707), sixth Mughal Emperor

Muhyiddin of Brunei (1673–1690), 14th Sultan of Brunei

Muhyi ad-Din Muzaffar Jang Hidayat (died 1751), ruler of Hyderabad

Cauder Mohideen (active 1795), first Kapitan Keling of Penang

Ghulam Mohiuddin Khan (died 1969), sixth Prince of Arcot

Makhdoom Mohiuddin (1908–1969), Indian Urdu poet and political activist

Zakaria Mohieddin (1918–2012), Egyptian military officer, politician, Prime Minister of Egypt

Mohideen Baig (1919–1991), Sri Lankan musician

Khaled Mohieddin (born 1922), Egyptian politician and soldier

Ahmed Mohiuddin (1923–1998), Pakistani scientist

Mohieddin Fikini (1925–1994), Libyan politician, Prime Minister of Libya

Ahmad Fuad Mohieddin (1926–1984), Egyptian politician, Prime Minister of Egypt

Taha Muhie-eldin Marouf (1929–2009), Iraqi-Kurdish politician

Zia Mohiuddin Dagar (Z. M. Dagar) (1929–1990), Indian musician

Zia Mohyeddin (born 1933), Pakistani actor

Mohie El Din El Ghareeb (born 1933), Egyptian, economist, politician, and businessman

Bawa Muhaiyaddeen (died 1986), Sri Lankan Tamil Sufi mystic

Mohiddin Badsha II (1933–1989), Indian yogi

Mohydeen Izzat Quandour (born 1938), Jordanian writer

Hossein Mohyeddin Elāhi Ghomshei, or just Hossein Elahi Ghomshei (born 1940), Iranian writer on Persian literature and Iranian mysticism

Muhiuddin Khan Alamgir (born 1942), Bangladeshi economist and politician

Mohyeldin Elzein (1943–2007), Sudanese doctor

A. B. M. Mohiuddin Chowdhury (born 1944), Bangladeshi politician

T. P. M. Mohideen Khan (born 1947), Indian politician

Muhyiddin Yassin (born 1947), Malay politician (with Malaysian nationality)

Mohiuddin Jahangir (1948–1971), Bangladesh army officer, awarded Bir Sreshtho

Ghulam Mohiuddin (actor) (born 1951), Pakistani actor

Sherif Mohie El Din (born 1964), Egyptian conductor and composer

Muhidin Čoralić (born 1968), Bosnian footballer

Sami Mohy El Din Muhammed Al Hajj, or just Sami al-Hajj (born 1968), Sudanese journalist held in Guantanamo

Mohiyedine Sharif (died 1998), Palestinian terrorist

Akhtar Mohiuddin, Pakistani football coach

Ayman Mohyeldin (born 1979), Egyptian-American journalist

Mohi-Din Binhendi, Emirati businessman

Mount Abdulaziz

Mount Abdulaziz or Abd al-Aziz (Arabic: جبل عبدالعزيز‎) is a mountain ridge located in the southwestern part of the Hasakah Governorate, some 35 km west-south-west from the center of the city of Hasakah, in northeastern Syria. The mountain extends from east to west and has a length of 85 km, a width of 15 km, and an area of 84,050 hectares. Jabal Abdulaziz consists of a series of hills and valleys whose altitudes ranges between 350 and 920 meters.

The mountain has taken its name after Abdul Aziz, a descendant of Abdul-Qadir Gilani, a military commander in Saladin's army, who had once taken the mountain as a fortified place. The former name of the mountain was ʾAl-Ḥiyāl الحيال.

The mount is currently under the control of Kurdish YPG forces.

Qadiriyya

The Qadiriyya (Arabic: القادريه‎, Persian: قادریه‎, also transliterated Qadri, Qadriya, Kadri, Elkadri, Elkadry, Aladray, Alkadrie, Adray, Kadray, Qadiri,"Quadri" or Qadri) are members of the Qadiri tariqa (Sufi order). The tariqa got its name from Abdul Qadir Gilani (1077–1166, also transliterated Jilani), who was from Gilan. The order relies strongly upon adherence to the fundamentals of Islam.

The order, with its many offshoots, is widespread, particularly in the Arabic-speaking world, and can also be found in Turkey, Indonesia, Afghanistan, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, the Balkans, Russia, Palestine, Israel, China, and East and West Africa.

Qutb Shah

Sayyed Qutb Shah ibn Ya‘lā, al-Gilani, al Qadiri, was a medieval Persian Sufi, Muslim Preacher, religious scholar. He was a Sayyid and a relative of Hazrat Shaykh Abdul-Qadir Gilani.He preached Islam to many people in the areas of modern Afghanistan and Northern and North-Western Pakistan circa 1090 AD and 1099 AD, and many tribes accepted Islam at this time. He is supposed to have returned to Herat (then Khorasan), after his preachings and died there. He is not to be confused with another, semi-legendary 'Qutab Shah' who was supposedly the primary ancestor of the Awans in present-day Pakistan.

Satgarah Okara

Satghara (Urdu: ستگهره‎), is a town and union council of Okara District in the Punjab province of Pakistan.

It is located at 30°55'0N 73°31'0E with an altitude of 164 metres (541 feet) and is also the location of the tomb of Baloch folk hero, Mir Chakar Rind. Many of his descendants as well as sub tribes of Baloch descent predominate in the district.

More than half of the town is inhabbited by Syeds. They also have a family graveyard where many great spiritual leaders including Syed Qaim Ali Shah Gilani who was also known as Pir Bodian Wala he was head of this lineage of the descendents of Abdul Qadir Gilani (Ghouse Al Azam) of Baghdad Sharif in Satghara, Syed Ahmed Shah Gilani who was lately known as Pir Bodian Wala was the eldest son, Syed Shams-Ud-Din Gilani, Syed Fateh Ali Shah Gilani, Syed Mubarik Ali Shah Gilani, Syed Ahmed Ali Shah Gilani (Chan Peer), Syed Jaffar Hussain Gilani, Syed Ali Bahadur Gilani, Syed Sher Shah Gilani and Syed Khadim Hussain Gilani(Peer Sahib) and Syed Abid Hussain Gilani are lying in peace. Their shrines are built in the graveyard and are visible even from a great distance.

Mounds of brick debris at Satghara mark the site of a forgotten town, the coins found at Satghara prove that it was inhabited in the time of the Kushan dynasty.The name of this town "Satghara" is commonly believed to drive its name from words (Saat or Seven) (Ghara or pitchers) or seven ghars seven homes. Another sound historical folklore is narrated that some injured soldiers of Alexandar the Great (belonging to ancient town of Stageira of Macedonia) resided their and they named this ancient town as Stageira now corrupted as Satghara.

Satghara

Satghara (Urdu: ستگهره‎), is a town and union council of Okara District in the Punjab province of Pakistan.

It is located at 30°55'0N 73°31'0E with an altitude of 164 metres (541 feet) and is also the location of the tomb of Baloch folk hero, Mir Chakar Rind. Many of his descendants as well as sub tribes of Baloch descent predominate in the district.

More than half of the town is inhabbited by Syeds. They also have a family graveyard where many great spiritual leaders including Syed Qaim Ali Shah Gilani who was also known as Pir Bodian Wala he was head of this lineage of the descendents of Abdul Qadir Gilani (Hazrat Ghouse Al Azam) of Baghdad Sharif in Satghara, Syed Ahmed Shah Gilani who was lately known as Pir Bodian Wala was the eldest son, Syed Shams-Ud-Din Gilani, Syed Fateh Ali Shah Gilani, Syed Mubarik Ali Shah Gilani, Syed Ahmed Ali Shah Gilani (Chan Peer), Syed Jaffar Hussain Gilani, Syed Ali Bahadur Gilani, Syed Sher Shah Gilani and Syed Khadim Hussain Gilani (Peer Sahib) are lying in peace. Their shrines are built in the graveyard and are visible even from a great distance.

Mounds of brick debris at Satghara mark the site of a forgotten town, the coins found at Satghara prove that it was inhabited in the time of the Kushan dynasty.The name of this town "Satghara" is commonly believed to drive its name from words (Saat or Seven) (Ghara or pitchers) or seven ghars seven homes. Another sound historical folklore is narrated that some injured soldiers of Alexandar the Great (belonging to ancient town of Stageira of Macedonia) resided their and they named this ancient town as Stageira now corrupted as Satghara.

Sheikh Ubeydullah

Sheikh Ubeydullah (died 1883) (Kurdish: Şêx Ubeydullayê Nehrî, شێخ وبه‌يدوڵاي نهری), also known as Sayyid Ubeydullah, was the leader of the first modern Kurdish nationalist struggle. Ubeydullah demanded recognition from Ottoman Empire and Qajar dynasty authorities for an independent Kurdish state, or Kurdistan, which he would govern without interference from Ottoman or Qajar authorities. He was a Sayyid, a descendant from Muhammad. He claimed descent from Abdul-Qadir Gilani.

Sheikh Ubeydullah was an influential landowner in the 19th century and a member of the powerful Kurdish Şemdinan family from Nehri. After his rebellion was suppressed, he was exiled first to Istanbul, then to Hijaz where he died.

Tahir Allauddin Al-Qadri Al-Gillani

Tahir Allauddin Al-Gillani (السيد طاهر علاؤ الدين الجيلاني البغدادي) (18 June 1932 – 7 June 1991) formally referred to as His Holiness, Qudwatul Awliya Naqeeb ul Ashraaf Hazoor Pir Syedna Tahir Allauddin alGillani alQadri alBaghdadi, was a Sufi Saint who lived in the twentieth century and was the head of the Qadiriyya Baghdadia Spiritual Tariqa. He was the custodian of the Shrine of Ghous-e-Azam Abdul-Qadir Gilani and has been accepted by many as a reformer of Tassawwuf and Tariqat. Born in Baghdad on 18 June 1932, he traces his lineage by seventeen steps to Abdul-Qadir Gilani and 28 steps to the Islamic prophet Muhammad.In 1956, Al-Gillani left Baghdad and migrated to Pakistan, where he settled permanently in Quetta. He stayed in Pakistan until he died in June 1991 in Germany, and later on he was buried in Lahore, Pakistan. He had three sons, AlSyed Mahmood Mohyuddin Al-Gillani Al-Qadri, AlSyed Abdul Qadir Jamaluddin Al-Gillani Al-Qadri and AlSyed Muhammad Ziauddin Al-Gillani Al-Qadri, who propagate the teachings of Silsilah e Qadiriyya Tahiria.

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