Aaron Kromer

Aaron Kromer (born April 30, 1967) is an American football offensive line coach and run game coordinator for the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL). He is the former offensive coordinator for the Chicago Bears and previously served as the interim head coach of the NFL's New Orleans Saints for the first six games of the 2012 season.

Aaron Kromer
Los Angeles Rams
Position:Offensive line coach & Run Game Coordinator
Personal information
Born:April 30, 1967 (age 52)
Sandusky, Ohio
Career information
High school:Castalia (OH) Margaretta
College:Miami (OH)
Career history
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Head coaching record
Regular season:2–4 (.333)
Coaching stats at PFR

Playing career

Kromer is a 1985 graduate of Margaretta High School in Castalia, Ohio, where he played football and basketball. He played offensive tackle for three seasons at Miami University from 1987 to 1989.[1]

Coaching career

Kromer was hired by the New Orleans Saints in 2008 as the running backs coach, before becoming the offensive line coach the following season. Under his tenure as OL coach, the Saints sent five players to a combined nine Pro Bowls, and tied for the fewest sacks in the league with 96.[1] Under Kromer, the Saints line twice won the Madden Most Valuable Protectors Award as the best offensive line in the league (in 2009 and 2011).[2] The Saints won Super Bowl XLIV with Kromer. He filled in as the Saints' interim head coach for the first six games of the 2012 NFL season as Joe Vitt and Sean Payton served their suspensions for "BountyGate".[3] The Saints went 2-4 during that season-opening stretch, losing each of their first four games by eight points or less.

On January 16, 2013, Kromer was announced as the new offensive coordinator and offensive line coach for the Chicago Bears. He joined Marc Trestman's initial coaching staff, after working with Trestman in Oakland.[4] In his first year, the Bears offense had the second-best scoring offense in the league with 445 points, behind the Denver Broncos, while finishing fifth with 4281 passing yards.[5] The offense also broke team records in total yards (6,109), passing yards (4,450), passing touchdowns (32) and first downs (344).[6] On February 12, 2014, offensive line assistant Pat Meyer was named offensive line coach while Kromer, who served as offensive coordinator and line coach in 2013, remained the offensive coordinator and continued to be involved in all aspects of the offense, including the line with an increased role with the passing game.[7]

On January 17, 2015, the Buffalo Bills reached a two-year deal with Kromer to be the team's new offensive line coach.[8] He was later suspended for 6 games by the Buffalo Bills after punching a child in the face, throwing his fishing pole in the lake, then threatening to kill his entire family.[9]

On January 30, 2018, Los Angeles Rams head coach Sean McVay promoted him to run game coordinator, after Matt LaFleur left to become the offensive coordinator of the Tennessee Titans. In order to help fill the void, McVay also named tight ends coach Shane Waldron the pass game coordinator.

Head coaching record

Team Year Regular season Postseason
Won Lost Ties Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
NO* 2012 2 4 0 .333 - - - - -
Total 2 4 0 .333 - - - -

* – Interim head coach

References

  1. ^ a b Mayer, Larry (January 16, 2013). "Bears hire Kromer as offensive coordinator, line coach". Chicago Bears. Archived from the original on September 22, 2015. Retrieved July 14, 2015.
  2. ^ Sheldon Mickles, "Bears hire Aaron Kromer as offensive coordinator" Archived October 4, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, The Advocate.
  3. ^ "Aaron Kromer logical fit as interim II coach". ESPN.com. Retrieved July 12, 2015.
  4. ^ Seligman, Andrew (January 16, 2013). "AP Source: Kromer new Bears offensive coordinator". Yahoo! Sports. Archived from the original on January 20, 2013. Retrieved January 16, 2013.
  5. ^ "NFL Team Total Offense Statistics – 2013". ESPN. Retrieved December 31, 2013.
  6. ^ Mayer, Larry (January 8, 2014). "Long named to PFF All-Rookie Team". Chicago Bears. Archived from the original on January 9, 2014. Retrieved January 8, 2014.
  7. ^ Mayer, Larry (February 12, 2014). "Bears promote Meyer, hire Kim". Chicago Bears. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 12, 2014.
  8. ^ Mello, Igor (January 17, 2015). "Report: Bills sign ex-Bears OC Aaron Kromer to two-year deal". Cbssports.com. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  9. ^ Mello, Igor (January 17, 2015). "Report: Bills OL coach Aaron Kromer suspended 6 games after allegedly punching minor". Cbssports.com. Retrieved January 17, 2015.

External links

2003 Oakland Raiders season

The 2003 Oakland Raiders season was the 44th season of professional football for the Oakland Raiders franchise, their 34th season as members of the National Football League, and their eighth season since returning to Oakland. They were led by head coach Bill Callahan in his second and final year as head coach of the Raiders. The Raiders played their home games at Network Associates Coliseum as members of the AFC West. They finished the season 4–12 to finish in a tie for last place. It marked the first time since 1999 that the Raiders failed to make the playoffs.

Quarterback Rich Gannon, who had been the league MVP the previous season, injured his shoulder in seventh game of the season and was put on injured reserve for the remainder of the season. He was replaced by Marques Tuiasosopo and Rick Mirer. The Raiders had a five-game losing streak in the middle of the season and lost seven games by a touchdown or less. Their 4–12 record tied them with the Chargers, Giants, and Cardinals as the worst team in football in 2003 and they received the second pick in the 2004 NFL Draft.

The season was the last year in Oakland for wide receivers Tim Brown and Jerry Rice. Both future Hall of Fame members were held to four total touchdowns for the season.

Following the season, Raiders owner Al Davis fired head coach Bill Callahan and replaced him with Norv Turner.The 2003 season marked a turning point in Oakland Raider history, as it started a long period of futility and decline for the team. From 2003 to 2015, the Raiders failed to make the playoffs or have a winning season.

2004 Oakland Raiders season

The 2004 Oakland Raiders season was the 45th of professional football for the Oakland Raiders franchise, their 35th season as members of the National Football League, and their ninth season since returning to Oakland. They were led by head coach Norv Turner in his first season as head coach of the Raiders. They played their home games at Network Associates Coliseum as member of the AFC West. They finished the season 5–11, finishing in last place in the AFC West for the second consecutive year.

Though Rich Gannon began the season as the Raiders starting quarterback, he suffered a neck injury in the third game of the season that would eventually lead to his retirement. For the second consecutive season, the Raiders suffered a five-game losing streak in the middle of the season. They only won one game by a touchdown or more, defeating their Super Bowl XXXVII opponent, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 20–10.

The team lost two of their starting receivers from the 2002 team: Tim Brown was released and signed with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Jerry Rice was traded to the Seattle Seahawks midseason.

2012 New Orleans Saints season

The 2012 New Orleans Saints season was the franchise's 46th season in the National Football League, and the 37th with home games at the Superdome. It was going to be the seventh season under head coach Sean Payton; however, he was suspended by the NFL for the entire 2012 season as part of the punishment for the team's bounty scandal. On April 12, 2012, linebackers coach Joe Vitt was named interim head coach to replace Sean Payton while he served his one-year suspension. On August 22, 2012, it was announced that Aaron Kromer would take over while Vitt himself served a six-game suspension to start the regular season. The Saints attempted to make history as the first host team to play the Super Bowl on their own home field, but they were eliminated from post-season contention in Week 16. The Saints set an NFL record for most yards given up by a defense, 7,042 yards, surpassing the 1981 Baltimore Colts record of 6,793 yards.

Dick Nolan (American football)

Richard Charles Nolan (March 26, 1932 – November 11, 2007) was an American football player and coach in the National Football League (NFL), and served as the head coach of the San Francisco 49ers and New Orleans Saints.

Ernie Hefferle

Ernest Edward Hefferle (January 12, 1915 – August 8, 2000) was an American football player and coach. He served as head football coach at Boston College from 1960 to 1961 and as the interim head coach for the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL) in 1975. A football star at Duquesne University, Hefferle pulled in a fourth quarter bomb from Boyd Brombaugh to win the 1937 Orange Bowl for the Dukes. He served as a high school coach in South Huntingdon, Pennsylvania and Tarentum, Pennsylvania from 1947 to 1950. From 1951 to 1958, he was assistant coach at the University of Pittsburgh. In 1959, he was an assistant under Mike Nixon with the Washington Redskins. He was head coach of the Boston College Eagles from 1960 to 1961, where he had a 7–12–1 record. On December 21, 1961 he resigned his position as head coach. From 1962 to 1964 and from 1970 to 1971, he was again and assistant at the University of Pittsburgh. In 1965, he served under former boss Mike Nixon on the Pittsburgh Steelers coaching staff. In 1975 Hefferle, then the Saints' director of pro personnel was hired as interim head after the firing of John North. He had a record 1–7 in his one half season as the Saints interim head coach.

Howard Mudd

Howard Edward Mudd (born February 10, 1942) is a former offensive lineman and offensive line coach in the National Football League (NFL). From 1998–2009, he was the offensive line coach for the Indianapolis Colts, with whom he won Super Bowl XLI. He played seven seasons for the San Francisco 49ers and the Chicago Bears from 1964 to 1970 in the National Football League. Mudd was a three-time Pro Bowler in 1966, 1967 and 1968. He retired in 1971 due to a knee injury, and began his coaching career at the University of California the following year.

Mudd attended Midland High School and Michigan State University. While at Michigan State he joined Delta Tau Delta International Fraternity. Mudd played football for Hillsdale College from 1960-63 where he was a starting guard and a team captain. His play at the school led to his induction into the NAIA Hall of Fame.For his work as an assistant coach, Mudd earned the Pro Football Writers of America Lifetime Achievement Award.

J. D. Roberts

John David "J. D." Roberts (born October 24, 1932) was an American football player and coach, serving as head coach of the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL) from the middle of the 1970 season until his dismissal after four preseason games in 1973.

Joe Vitt

Joe Vitt (born August 23, 1954) is an American football coach for the New York Jets of the National Football League. he was the assistant head coach and linebackers coach of the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). He was the interim head coach for the New Orleans Saints during the 2012 season and the St. Louis Rams for their last eleven games in 2005.

Kromer

Kromer may refer to:

PeopleAaron Kromer, American football coach

George "Stormy" Kromer, creator of the Stormy Kromer cap

Leon Kromer, American soldier and football coach

Marcin Kromer (German: Martin Cromer; 1512 - 1589), Prince-Bishop of Warmia (Ermland), cartographer

House of Kromer

Tom Kromer (1906 - 1969), American writerOtherThe Stormy Kromer Pursuit, 2-day cross-country skiing event

Kurt Anderson (American football)

Kurt Kristoffer Anderson (born August 8, 1978) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the offensive line coach with the Northwestern Wildcats. He is the former

offensive line coach at the University of Arkansas. Anderson played college football at the University of Michigan. After his playing career, Anderson became a professional football coach. He served as the assistant offensive line coach for the Buffalo Bills in the National Football League (NFL). In the 2015 season, Anderson took over head offensive line coaching duties for training camp and the first six weeks of the regular season for the suspended Aaron Kromer.

List of New Orleans Saints head coaches

The New Orleans Saints are a professional American football team based in New Orleans, Louisiana. They are a member of the South Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The NFL awarded the city of New Orleans the 16th franchise in the league in November 1, 1966, All Saints Day, five months after the 89th United States Congress approved the merger of the NFL with the American Football League (AFL) in June of that year. In January 1967, the team was given the current "New Orleans Saints" name, and began playing in their first season in September of that year. Since the franchise's creation, it has been based in New Orleans. The team's home games were originally played at Tulane Stadium from 1967 to 1974, it was demolished in 1979, when the team relocated its home games to its current stadium, the Mercedes-Benz Superdome (formerly Louisiana Superdome from 1975 to 2011).The New Orleans Saints have had 16 head coaches in their franchise history—ten full-time coaches and six interim coaches. Sean Payton has been the head coach of the Saints since 2006. Payton served as the assistant head coach/passing game coordinator and assistant head coach/quarterbacks for the Dallas Cowboys for three seasons before he joined the Saints in 2006. In the 2009 season, he led the team to its second NFC Championship Game and first NFC Championship title, Super Bowl (XLIV) appearance, and NFL Championship. Tom Fears, the franchise's first head coach serving from 1967 to 1970, was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1970, and is the only coach to be inducted into the Hall of Fame while spending his entire coaching career with the Saints. Hank Stram, who coached the Saints from 1976 to 1977, and Mike Ditka, who coached the Saints from 1997 to 1999, were also inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2003 and 1988, respectively. Sean Payton has coached the most games for the Saints, with 170. Payton has the highest winning percentage while coaching the Saints, with .588, and his 102 wins are the most in franchise history. J. D. Roberts has the lowest winning percentage (.219) and fewest wins (seven) for a full-time coach. Jim Haslett, Mora, and Payton are the only head coaches to lead the Saints into the playoffs. Mora, Haslett, and Payton have won the AP Coach of the Year Award and the Sporting News NFL Coach of the Year.

List of New Orleans Saints seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the New Orleans Saints American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Saints' franchise from 1967 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coach.

List of current National Football League offensive coordinators

Below is a list of current National Football League offensive coordinators.

Malcolm Jenkins

Malcolm Jenkins (born December 20, 1987) is an American football safety for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Ohio State, earning consensus All-American honors, and winning the Jim Thorpe Award as a senior. He was drafted by the New Orleans Saints in the first round of the 2009 NFL Draft.

Mike Tice

Michael Peter Tice (born February 2, 1959) is a retired NFL coach and most recently was the offensive line coach for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League. He was the head coach of the Minnesota Vikings from 2002 to 2005. He was also formerly the offensive coordinator for the Chicago Bears.

Rick Venturi

Rick Venturi (born February 23, 1946) is a former American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at Northwestern University and as longtime National Football League assistant coach known for his defense. As the head coach at Northwestern from 1978 to 1980, Venturi compiled a record of 1-31-1. During his tenure as coach of the Northwestern Wildcats' NCAA Division I had a record 34-game losing streak. Venturi has served as the defensive coordinator with the Indianapolis Colts, Cleveland Browns, New Orleans Saints, and St. Louis Rams. Venturi also served as an interim head coach, in 1991 with the Colts and 1996 with the Saints. As a head coach in the NFL, his career record stands at 2–17.

Venturi played quarterback at Rockford Auburn High School in Illinois as a sophomore and junior, and then at Pekin High School for his senior year before enrolling at Northwestern. While at Northwestern he joined the Delta Upsilon fraternity. His father, Joe Venturi, was a member of the Illinois High School Football Coaches Hall of Fame. Joe coached at Pekin High School in Illinois. His brother, John is also a member of the Illinois High School Football Coaches Hall of Fame. John coached at Washington High School where he won the 1985 Class 4A State Championship. John's 1983 Washington team was the 4A Runner-Up.

Shane Waldron

Shane Waldron (born August 17, 1979) is an American football coach who is the current pass game coordinator coach of the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL). He was previously the tight ends coach for the New England Patriots of the National Football League and coach for the Washington Redskins.

Tom Fears

Thomas Jesse Fears (December 3, 1922 – January 4, 2000) was an American football split end for the Los Angeles Rams in the National Football League (NFL), playing nine seasons from 1948 to 1956. He was later an NFL assistant coach and head coach of the New Orleans Saints, and is in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He played college football for the UCLA Bruins football team and is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

Wade Phillips

Wade Phillips (born June 21, 1947) is an American football coach who is the defensive coordinator for the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League (NFL). He also served two stints as defensive coordinator of the Denver Broncos, where his team was Super Bowl finalists in his first stint and champions in his second stint. He has served as head coach of the NFL's Denver Broncos, Buffalo Bills, and Dallas Cowboys. He was also an interim head coach for the New Orleans Saints, Atlanta Falcons, and the Houston Texans. His career winning percentage as a head coach is .546. Phillips is considered to be among the best defensive coordinators in the NFL.

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