Aaron Boone

Aaron John Boone (born March 9, 1973) is an American former professional baseball infielder, broadcaster, and current manager for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). He is the son of Bob Boone, grandson of Ray Boone, and the brother of Bret Boone. He played in MLB for the Cincinnati Reds, New York Yankees, Cleveland Indians, Florida Marlins, Washington Nationals, and Houston Astros from 1997 through 2009.

Boone was an All-Star in 2003, and hit a series-winning walk-off home run in the 2003 American League Championship Series. From 2010 to 2017, Boone was employed by ESPN as a game analyst and was a color commentator for ESPN's Sunday Night Baseball coverage, as well as a contributor to Baseball Tonight. In December 2017, the Yankees hired Boone to become the 33rd manager in franchise history.

Aaron Boone
Aaron Boone
Boone with the Washington Nationals in 2008
New York Yankees – No. 17
Third baseman / Manager
Born: March 9, 1973 (age 46)
La Mesa, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 20, 1997, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
October 4, 2009, for the Houston Astros
MLB statistics
Batting average.263
Home runs126
Runs batted in555
Managerial record162-95
Winning %.630
Teams
As player

As manager

Career highlights and awards

Amateur career

Boone attended Villa Park High School in Villa Park, California. He batted .423 with 22 stolen bases for the school's baseball team in his senior year, and was named the Century League's co-player of the year. The California Angels selected Boone on the third day of the 1991 MLB draft, but he had no intention to sign a professional contract.[1] He attended the University of Southern California (USC) and played college baseball for the USC Trojans. In 1993, he played collegiate summer baseball for the Orleans Cardinals of the Cape Cod Baseball League, and Orleans won the league's championship.[2][3]

Professional career

Cincinnati Reds

The Cincinnati Reds selected Boone in the third round of the 1994 MLB draft.[4] Boone made his MLB debut in June 1997,[5] and was ejected from the game after being called out sliding into home.[6][7] On the last day of the 1998 season, the Reds started the only MLB infield composed of two sets of brothers: first baseman Stephen Larkin, second baseman Bret Boone, shortstop Barry Larkin, and third baseman Aaron Boone.[8][9]

On September 22, 2002, Boone hit the last home run in Riverfront Stadium in the eighth inning, a solo home run off Dan Plesac. Boone hit a career-high 26 home runs in 2002, playing in all 162 games. The Reds named Boone their team's most valuable player award. He appeared in the 2003 MLB All-Star Game.[10]

New York Yankees

The New York Yankees acquired Boone from the Reds for Brandon Claussen, Charlie Manning and cash on July 31, 2003.[11] In 54 games after the trade, he hit .254 with a .720 OPS, six home runs and 31 RBIs.[12]

During Game 7 of the 2003 American League Championship Series (ALCS), Boone hit a walk-off home run in the 11th inning, off of Tim Wakefield, which gave the New York Yankees a 6–5 victory over the Boston Red Sox, thus prolonging the Curse of the Bambino. The New York Daily News dubbed the play the "Curse of the Boonebino".[13] This home run was rated the ninth-best home run of all time on Baseball Tonight. For some time afterward, Red Sox fans called Boone "Aaron Fucking Boone," much as they called Bucky Dent "Bucky Fucking Dent."[14]

In January 2004, Boone tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee during a pick-up basketball game. The game violated the standard MLB player contract, which forbids taking part in off-season basketball, skiing and surfing. The Yankees immediately hinted that they would terminate his contract.[15][16][17] Soon after signing Alex Rodriguez to play third base, the Yankees released Boone on February 27, 2004.[12]

Cleveland Indians

Boone signed a two-year contract with the Cleveland Indians in June 2004. He earned $600,000 for 2004, $3 million for the 2005 season, and a club option for the 2006 season worth $4.5 million.[18] After missing the entire 2004 season, Boone played 154 games in 2005. He batted .243 with 16 home runs and 60 RBIs.[19] The Indians exercised an option on Boone's contract for the 2006 season.[20] In his second season with Cleveland, he batted .251 with seven home runs.[21]

Later career

AaronBoone
Boone with the Marlins in 2007

On December 29, 2006, Boone signed a one-year contract with the Florida Marlins worth $925,000.[21][22] He batted .286 in 69 games for the Marlins in 2007.[23]

On December 6, 2007, Boone signed a one-year, $1,000,000 contract with the Washington Nationals.[24]

On December 18, 2008, Boone signed a one-year $750,000, plus incentives, deal with the Houston Astros.[25]

In March 2009, Boone underwent open-heart surgery to replace a bicuspid aortic valve, a condition that he has been aware of since childhood but which routine tests indicated had recently worsened. Boone stated that doctors told him he could play baseball when he recovers, but he was not sure if he would choose to do so.[26][27][28] Boone returned to baseball on August 10, when he began his rehabilitation with the Corpus Christi Hooks, the Astros' Double-A minor league affiliate. He played five innings and was hitless in two plate appearances. Boone stated after the game that his goal was to return to the major leagues by September 1, the date that major league rosters expand.[29] Boone was activated on September 1, and added to the Astros' expanded roster.[30] On September 2, Boone made his season debut, playing at first base and going 0 for 3.[31] On September 16, Boone stated that he was leaning towards retirement, and on October 4 he played his last game.

Broadcasting career

Boone served as a guest analyst for the MLB Network coverage of the 2009 ALCS between the New York Yankees and Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

On February 23, 2010, Boone announced his retirement and that he would become an analyst for ESPN.[32] Boone appeared on Monday Night Baseball and for Baseball Tonight's pregame show on Sunday night.[33] Boone called the 2014 and 2015 World Series for ESPN Radio with play-by-play announcer Dan Shulman.[34] He and Jessica Mendoza became color commentators on Sunday Night Baseball with Shulman in 2016.[33] Boone and Shulman continued to call World Series games for ESPN Radio through 2017.[35]

Managing career

New York Yankees

2018 season

After the 2017 season, the Yankees decided not to retain Joe Girardi as their manager. The Yankees hired Boone to succeed him on December 4, 2017.[36][37][38] The Yankees started the 2018 season with a 6–1 win against the Toronto Blue Jays on March 29, 2018.[39] On September 2, 2018, Boone was suspended for one game for making illegal contact with an umpire.[40] He finished his first season with a 100-62 record,[41] good for second in the American League East,[41] and led the Yankees to the wild card game against the Oakland Athletics, despite losing Aaron Judge for two months with a wrist injury. On October 3, 2018, the Yankees defeated the Athletics 7-2 to advance to the American League Division Series,[42] giving Boone his first postseason win as a manager. The Boston Red Sox eliminated the New York Yankees three–games–to–one in the American League Division Series.[43]

Managerial record

As of July 19, 2019
Team Year Regular season Postseason
Games Won Lost Win % Finish Won Lost Win % Result
NYY 2018 162 100 62 .617 2nd in AL East 2 3 .400 Lost in ALDS
NYY 2019 95 62 33 .645 TBD
Total 257 162 95 .632 2 3 .400

Personal life

He is the son of former catcher and manager Bob Boone, the brother of All Star and four Gold Glove winner Bret Boone, the brother of former Cincinnati Reds minor leaguer Matt Boone, and the grandson of former major leaguer Ray Boone. He is a descendant of pioneer Daniel Boone. As children, Aaron and Bret spent time in the Phillies clubhouse with fellow sons of other major league players, including Pete Rose Jr.[44]

Boone's wife, Laura Cover, was a Playboy Playmate (Miss October 1998). Boone lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.[45][46] Boone and Cover have four children; two biological children and two adopted.[47]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Boone's Son Aaron Is Latest to Be Drafted by the Angels : Baseball: Villa Park shortstop happy to be selected, but he intends to honor his commitment to play at USC. - latimes". Articles.latimes.com. June 6, 1991. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  2. ^ http://orleansfirebirds.pointstreaksites.com/view/orleansfirebirds/history/modern-era
  3. ^ http://capecodbaseball.org.ismmedia.com/ISM3/std-content/repos/Top/2012website/archives/Current%20Year/All_Time_MLB_CCBL_Alumni.pdf
  4. ^ "3rd Round of the 1994 MLB June Amateur Draft". Baseball-Reference.com. January 1, 1970. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  5. ^ http://m.mlb.com/cutfour/2015/06/20/131833324/aaron-boone-takes-brothers-place-in-mlb-debut
  6. ^ "Aaron Boone Has No Coaching Experience? Don't Tell That to His Flag Football Team". The New York Times. March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 22, 2018.
  7. ^ "Boone thrown out, ejected in debut". MLB on YouTube. June 23, 2015. Retrieved April 22, 2018.
  8. ^ "Games That Matter | By Barry Larkin". Theplayerstribune.com. October 1, 2015. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  9. ^ "Aaron Boone puts his USC degree, and his heart, to new work for ESPN | Farther Off the Wall". Insidesocal.com. February 23, 2010. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  10. ^ "Day 63: Aaron Boone, 2003 Reds' All-Star". Cincinnati.com. May 12, 2015. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  11. ^ "Reds' breakup continues: Boone dealt to Yankees". ESPN.com. July 31, 2003.
  12. ^ a b "With release, Boone is a free agent". Espn.com. February 26, 2004. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  13. ^ McCarron, Anthony (October 17, 2003). "It's the Curse of the Boonebino Shot in 11th Makes History of Sox". New York Daily News. p. 78.
  14. ^ Vaccaro, Mike (2006). Emperors and Idiots: The Hundred Year Rivalry Between the Yankees and Red Sox, From the Very Beginning to the End of the Curse.
  15. ^ "Hurt playing hoops, Boone might miss season". Espn.com. January 28, 2004. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  16. ^ https://www.si.com/vault/2004/04/05/366859/a-boone-to-baseball
  17. ^ Vaccaro, Mike (2006). Emperors and Idiots: The Hundred Year Rivalry Between the Yankees and Red Sox, From the Very Beginning to the End of the Curse.
  18. ^ "Indians, Boone agree on two-year contract - Sports - The Daily Record - Wooster, OH". The Daily Record. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  19. ^ Kevin Yanik (January 2, 2017). "Batting Around with Aaron Boone | Cleveland Indians". Cleveland.indians.mlb.com. Archived from the original on December 2, 2017. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  20. ^ MLB.com (June 26, 2004). "Indians and Boone re-structure 2006 contract; Option for next year exercised". Cleveland.indians.mlb.com. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  21. ^ a b "Marlins sign veteran third baseman Aaron Boone". Espn.com. December 29, 2006. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  22. ^ "Marlins sign infielder Aaron Boone". MLB.com (Press release). December 29, 2006. Retrieved September 7, 2008.
  23. ^ "Marlins park top priority - South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com". Web.archive.org. October 27, 2007. Archived from the original on October 27, 2007. Retrieved December 2, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  24. ^ "Nats add Boone, avoid arbitration with Pena, Langerhans". ESPN.com. Associated Press. December 6, 2007. Archived from the original on October 23, 2012. Retrieved September 7, 2008.
  25. ^ "Astros sign Boone to one-year deal". MLB.com (Press release). December 18, 2008. Archived from the original on February 25, 2012. Retrieved December 18, 2008.
  26. ^ "Boone to Have Heart Surgery". Sports Illustrated. CNN. March 18, 2009. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011.
  27. ^ "Aaron Boone headed for open-heart surgery". Cleveland Plain Dealer. March 19, 2009. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015. Retrieved March 19, 2009.
  28. ^ "Boone Undergoes Surgery". ESPN. March 26, 2009. Archived from the original on March 30, 2009. Retrieved March 29, 2009.
  29. ^ Torenli, John (August 10, 2009). "Astros' Boone returns to diamond". MLB.com. Archived from the original on November 3, 2012. Retrieved August 11, 2009.
  30. ^ "Astros activate Boone 5 months after heart surgery". Yahoo! Sports. Associated Press. September 1, 2009. Archived from the original on May 30, 2014.
  31. ^ "Lee's two-run homer powers Lilly, Cubs past Astros". ESPN.com. Associated Press. September 2, 2009. Archived from the original on November 3, 2012.
  32. ^ "Aaron Boone joins ESPN as analyst". ESPN.com. February 23, 2010. Archived from the original on November 4, 2012. Retrieved February 23, 2010.
  33. ^ a b Cafardo, Ben (January 13, 2016). "ESPN Names New Sunday Night Baseball Analysts: Jessica Mendoza & Aaron Boone". ESPN MediaZone. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  34. ^ "Listen to the World Series on 97.3 ESPN". 973espn.com. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  35. ^ Skarka, Michael (October 5, 2017). "ESPN Radio to Broadcast Every Pitch of the 2017 MLB Postseason". ESPN MediaZone. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  36. ^ http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2017/12/04/yankees-hire-aaron-boone-official/
  37. ^ "Aaron Boone tabbed to be new manager for Yankees". MLB. Retrieved December 4, 2017.
  38. ^ "Mark Teixeira says Aaron Boone the right guy to manage Yankees young stars". NY Daily News. Retrieved December 2, 2017.
  39. ^ Longley, Rob (March 29, 2018). "Stanton, Yankees crush Blue Jays in opening-day drubbing". Toronto Sun. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  40. ^ "Aaron Boone suspended one game for bumping umpire". MLB. Retrieved September 2, 2018.
  41. ^ a b "Aaron Boone". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  42. ^ "New York Yankees rout A's to set up ALDS showdown with Boston Red Sox". The Guardian. Associated Press. October 4, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  43. ^ Hoffmann, Benjamin; Wagner, James (October 10, 2018). "Red Sox Eliminate Yankees From Playoffs in a Photo Finish". New York Times. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  44. ^ Grimsley, Will (March 8, 1979). "Phillies 'Kiddie Korps' Enjoys Spring Romps". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Associated Press. Retrieved October 14, 2009.
  45. ^ "Playmate News". Playboy. Playboy. 55: 143–144. November 2008.
  46. ^ Jason McIntyre. "Players and their favorite Playmates". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on November 4, 2012.
  47. ^ Bucher, Chris (December 2, 2017). "Laura Cover, Aaron Boone's Wife: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know". Heavy.com. Retrieved December 5, 2017.

External links

2003 American League Championship Series

The 2003 American League Championship Series (ALCS) was played between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees from October 8 to 16, 2003. The Yankees won the series four games to three to advance to the World Series, where they lost in six games to the National League champion Florida Marlins.

2010 Utah Blaze season

The 2010 Utah Blaze season is the 4th season for the franchise in the Arena Football League. The team was coached by Ernesto Purnsley, who was fired on June 1, 2010, with Ron James named as his replacement. Home games are played at the Maverik Center, which was known as the "E Center" prior to being renamed on June 8, 2010. The Blaze missed out on the postseason after finishing the season 2–14, the worst record in the league.

2018 New York Yankees season

The 2018 New York Yankees season was the 116th season in New York City for the Yankees, and the 118th season overall for the franchise. This was the team's first season without manager Joe Girardi since 2007, and first season with manager Aaron Boone. The Yankees defeated the Oakland Athletics in the Wild Card Game before losing to the Boston Red Sox in four games in the Division Series.

Aaron Boone (American football)

Aaron Rostenbach Boone (born January 13, 1978) is a former American professional gridiron football wide receiver. He played college football at Kentucky. He was originally signed as an undrafted free agent by the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL) in 2003.

In his career, Boone has also played for the Chicago Bears, Carolina Panthers, Berlin Thunder (NFL Europe), Philadelphia Soul, Kansas City Brigade, and Utah Blaze of the Arena Football League (AFL). In 2011, before suffering a career-ending knee surgery, he became the Utah Blaze's all-time leading receiver in all categories including receptions, yards and touchdowns.

Billings Mustangs

The Billings Mustangs are a minor league baseball team based in Billings, Montana. The Mustangs are the Pioneer League Rookie affiliate of the Major League Cincinnati Reds. The team has been a part of the Pioneer League since 1948 with a five-year gap between 1964 and 1968, and has been affiliated with the Reds since 1974 (after an affiliation with the Kansas City Royals). Along with the Elizabethton Twins, the Mustangs affiliation with the Reds is the longest-running among all rookie-level teams. The team was officially established on November 4, 1947.

The Mustangs play at Dehler Park, named after Jon Dehler, a Billings businessman who bought the naming right to the field in 2007. Prior to the 2008 season the Mustangs played at Cobb Field (named after Bob Cobb who was responsible for bringing professional baseball to the city of Billings). Cobb Field was demolished in September 2007 to make way for the new park.

The Mustangs won three consecutive Pioneer League titles from 1992 and 1994, then won another in 1997. In 2003, Billings swept the Provo Angels in the Championship Series, winning two games to none. Provo had tied the league record for wins that year with 54. Billings, the last team to qualify for the postseason, won Game 1 at Provo 8-5 in 11 innings, then, Billings won 3-0 on a no-hitter by James Paduch to win the Championship in front of a sold-out Cobb Field in Billings. The game was a classic pitchers duel between two of the top pitchers in the league (Provo's being 2003 Pioneer League Pitcher of the Year Abel Moreno). In 2006, Chris Valaika set a Pioneer League record with a 32-game hitting streak during the Mustangs 51-win campaign.

Many Major League stars have begun their pro careers in Billings. These include George Brett, Reggie Sanders, Paul O'Neill, Trevor Hoffman, Keith Lockhart, Danny Tartabull, Ben Broussard, Scott Sullivan, Aaron Boone, Adam Dunn, Austin Kearns, and B. J. Ryan.

After years of award-winning work in the front office, Assistant General Manager Gary Roller was promoted to General Manager for the 2005 season. Roller took over for long time GM and Mustangs Hall-of-Famer Bob Wilson. Matt Bender, who formerly handled the duties of Official Scorer, took over the vacated Assistant General Manager position.

Dehler Park (and before at Cobb Field) is renowned in the Pioneer League for the "Beer Batter" tradition. Every game the Mustangs Beer Boosters designate one player as the "Beer Batter." If that player gets a hit, attendees can buy four beers for $10. Many eager buyers stand at the stairs anticipating a hit and the oncoming rush of people.

The Billings Mustangs changed their logo for the 2006 season. The 2007 season was their last at Cobb Field and the Mustangs begin the 2008 season at Dehler Park. On September 11, 2014, the Mustangs defeated the Orem Owlz for their first Pioneer League Championship since the 2003 season. After the 2014 season The team introduced its new ownership group at a December 5 in a press conference at Dehler Park.

Bob Boone

Robert Raymond Boone (born November 19, 1947) is an American former catcher and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB) who was a four-time All-Star. Born in San Diego, California, Bob Boone is the son of a Major League player, the late third baseman Ray Boone, and he is the father of two Major Leaguers: former second baseman Bret Boone and former utility infielder Aaron Boone. All four family members were named All-Stars during their careers.

Buddy Bell

David Gus Bell (born August 27, 1951) is an American former third baseman and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB) currently serving as vice president and senior advisor to the general manager for the Cincinnati Reds. After an 18-year career with four teams, most notably the Cleveland Indians, the Texas Rangers, and the Cincinnati Reds, he managed the Detroit Tigers, Colorado Rockies and Kansas City Royals for three seasons each and served as Vice President/Assistant General Manager for the Chicago White Sox. He was a five-time MLB All-Star and won six consecutive Rawlings Gold Glove Awards from 1979–84. He is the son of outfielder Gus Bell and the father of former third basemen Mike and David Bell, making them one of five families to have three generations play in the Major Leagues. When David was named Reds manager in October 2018, he and Buddy became the fourth father-son pair to serve as major league managers, joining George and Dick Sisler, Bob and Joel Skinner, and Bob and Aaron Boone.

Clint Frazier

Clint Jackson Frazier (born September 6, 1994), nicknamed "Red Thunder", is an American professional baseball outfielder for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). A top prospect for the 2013 MLB draft, the Cleveland Indians chose Frazier with the fifth overall selection. The Indians traded Frazier (among other prospects) to the Yankees in 2016 for relief pitcher Andrew Miller. Frazier made his MLB debut in 2017.

Craig Sheffer

Craig Eric Sheffer (born April 23, 1960) is an American film and television actor. He is known for his leading roles as Norman Maclean in the film A River Runs Through It, Aaron Boone in the film Nightbreed, and Keith Scott on the television series One Tree Hill.

Dan Shulman

Daniel "Dan" Shulman (born February 9, 1967) is a Canadian sportscaster with the American network ESPN as well as Canadian network Sportsnet.

Shulman serves as a play-by-play announcer for ESPN's men's college basketball coverage (with Jay Bilas), select regular season Major League Baseball games, and post-season MLB coverage on ESPN Radio. He also calls select Toronto Blue Jays telecasts on Sportsnet and hosts a baseball-themed podcast, Swing and a Belt with Dan Shulman.

Previously, Shulman served as the play-by-play announcer for ESPN's Sunday Night Baseball (with Aaron Boone and Jessica Mendoza), a position he resigned from at the conclusion of the 2017 season.

David Bell (baseball)

David Michael Bell (born September 14, 1972) is an American former professional baseball third baseman, who is currently the manager for the Cincinnati Reds of Major League Baseball (MLB). Over the course of his 12-year MLB playing career, Bell appeared at all four infield positions while playing for the Cleveland Indians, St. Louis Cardinals, Seattle Mariners, San Francisco Giants, Philadelphia Phillies, and Milwaukee Brewers. He made his MLB debut for the Indians in 1995.

After his retirement as an active player, Bell served as manager of the Triple-A Louisville Bats and (former) Double-A Carolina Mudcats, both in the Reds organization, prior to his promotion to Reds skipper, late in 2018.

The grandson of Gus Bell, son of Buddy Bell, and brother of Mike Bell, David Bell is a member of one of five families to have three generations play in the Major Leagues. In addition, David and Buddy are the fifth father-son pair to serve as major league managers, joining Connie and Earle Mack, George and Dick Sisler, Bob and Joel Skinner, and Bob and Brett Boone and Aaron Boone.

List of ESPN Major League Baseball broadcasters

ESPN Major League Baseball broadcasters are listed below, including games broadcast only on ESPN currently and formerly.

List of Major League Baseball Wild Card Game broadcasters

The following is a list of the national television and radio networks and announcers who have covered the Major League Baseball Wild Card Games throughout the years. It does not include any announcers who may have appeared on local radio broadcasts produced by the participating teams.

List of Major League Baseball on ESPN Radio broadcasters

Listed below is a list of Major League Baseball on ESPN Radio broadcasters by both name and year since the program's debut on ESPN Radio in 1998.

List of National League Division Series broadcasters

The following is a list of the national television and radio networks and announcers who have broadcast the National League Division Series. It does not include any announcers who may have appeared on local radio broadcasts produced by the participating teams.

List of New York Yankees managers

The New York Yankees are a professional baseball team based in New York City, New York in the borough of The Bronx. The New York Yankees are members of the American League (AL) East Division in Major League Baseball (MLB). The Yankees have won the World Series 27 times, more than any other MLB team. In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager, or more formally, the field manager. The duties of the team manager include team strategy and leadership on and off the field. Since starting to play as the Baltimore Orioles (no relationship to the current Baltimore Orioles team) in 1901, the team has employed 35 managers. The current manager is Aaron Boone, the current general manager is Brian Cashman and the current owners are Hal and Hank Steinbrenner, who are sons of George Steinbrenner, who first bought the Yankees in 1973.

New York Yankees

The New York Yankees are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of the Bronx. The Yankees compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. They are one of two major league clubs based in New York City; the other club is the National League (NL)'s New York Mets. In the 1901 season, the club began play in the AL as the Baltimore Orioles (no relation to the modern Baltimore Orioles). Frank Farrell and Bill Devery purchased the franchise that had ceased operations and moved it to New York City, renaming the club the New York Highlanders. The Highlanders were officially renamed the Yankees in 1913.The team is owned by Yankee Global Enterprises, an LLC that is controlled by the family of the late George Steinbrenner, who purchased the team in 1973. Brian Cashman is the team's general manager, and Aaron Boone is the team's field manager. The team's home games were played at the original Yankee Stadium from 1923 to 1973 and from 1976 to 2008. In 1974 and 1975, the Yankees shared Shea Stadium with the Mets, in addition to the New York Jets, and New York Giants. In 2009, they moved into a new ballpark of the same name that was constructed next door to the previous facility, which was closed and demolished. The team is perennially among the leaders in MLB attendance.

The Yankees are arguably the most successful professional sports team in the United States; they have won 40 AL pennants, and 27 World Series championships, all of which are MLB records. The Yankees have won more titles than any other franchise in the four major North American sports leagues. Forty-four Yankees players and eleven Yankees managers have been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame, including Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, and Whitey Ford. In pursuit of winning championships, the franchise has used a large payroll to attract talent, particularly during the Steinbrenner era. According to Forbes, the Yankees are the second highest valued sports franchise in the United States and the fifth in the world, with an estimated value of approximately $4 billion. The Yankees have garnered enormous popularity and a dedicated fanbase, as well as widespread enmity from fans of other MLB teams. The team's rivalry with the Boston Red Sox is one of the most well-known rivalries in U.S. sports.

From 1903–2018, the Yankees' overall win-loss record is 10,275–7,781 (a .569 winning percentage).

Ray Boone

Raymond Otis Boone (July 27, 1923 – October 17, 2004) was an American Major League Baseball player. He batted and threw right-handed.

Boone was born in San Diego, California, and attended San Diego's Hoover High School. He served in the United States Navy during World War II.

An infielder, he broke into the major leagues on September 3, 1948, with the Cleveland Indians. In a thirteen-year career, he hit .275 with 151 home runs in 1373 games for Cleveland, the Detroit Tigers, the Chicago White Sox, the Kansas City Athletics, the Milwaukee Braves and the Boston Red Sox.

Boone was followed into the majors by son, Bob Boone, who was a catcher from 1972 to 1990 and grandsons Bret Boone, who played from 1992 to 2005, and Aaron Boone, who played 1997 to 2009. The Boone family was the first to send three generations of players to the All-Star Game. Recently, the Washington Nationals selected Ray's great-grandson, Jake (Bret's son) in the 2017 draft, making the Boone family the first to produce four generations of players. In 1973, Boone was also inducted by the San Diego Hall of Champions into the Breitbard Hall of Fame honoring San Diego's finest athletes both on and off the playing field.Boone, in his later years, spent over three decades as a Red Sox scout and was well known as the leader of the local San Diego National Lumberjack Association chapter.Boone was a descendant of American pioneer Daniel Boone.Boone died at the age of 81 on October 17, 2004 following a long illness in San Diego.

Utah Blaze

The Utah Blaze were a professional arena football team based in Salt Lake City, Utah and competed in the West Division of the Arena Football League. Home games were played at the EnergySolutions Arena. In 2013, the team did not submit proper documentation to remain in the AFL and the entire roster was reassigned to other teams in the league.

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