A Dreamer's Tales

A Dreamer's Tales is the fifth book by Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, considered a major influence on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, Ursula K. Le Guin, and others. It was first published in hardcover by George Allen & Sons in September 1910, and has been reprinted a number of times since. Issued by the Modern Library in a combined edition with The Sword of Welleran and Other Stories as A Dreamer's Tales and Other Stories in 1917.

The book is actually Dunsany's fourth major work, as his preceding book, The Fortress Unvanquishable, Save for Sacnoth (March 1910), was a chapbook reprinting a single story from his earlier collection The Sword of Welleran and Other Stories (October, 1908).

In common with most of Dunsany's early books, A Dreamer's Tales is a collection of fantasy short stories.

A Dreamer's Tales
ADreamersTales
First edition
AuthorLord Dunsany
IllustratorSidney Sime
CountryUK
LanguageEnglish
GenreFantasy
PublisherGeorge Allen & Sons
Publication date
1910
Media typePrint (hardback)
Preceded byThe Sword of Welleran and Other Stories 
Followed byThe Book of Wonder 

Contents

  • "Preface"
  • "Poltarnees, Beholder of Ocean"
  • "Blagdaross"
  • "The Madness of Andelsprutz"
  • "Where the Tides Ebb and Flow"
  • "Bethmoora"
  • "Idle Days on the Yann"
  • "The Sword and the Idol"
  • "The Idle City"
  • "The Hashish Man"
  • "Poor Old Bill"
  • "The Beggars"
  • "Carcassonne"
  • "In Zaccarath"
  • "The Field"
  • "The Day of the Poll"
  • "The Unhappy Body"

Sources

  • Joshi, S. T. (1993). Lord Dunsany: a Bibliography / by S. T. Joshi and Darrell Schweitzer. Metuchen, N.J.: The Scarecrow Press, Inc. p. 3.

External links

1910 in Ireland

Events from the year 1910 in Ireland.

At the Edge of the World (short story collection)

At the Edge of the World is a collection of fantasy short stories by Irish writer Lord Dunsany, edited by Lin Carter. It was first published in paperback by Ballantine Books as the thirteenth volume of its Ballantine Adult Fantasy series in March 1970. It was the series' second Dunsany volume, and the first collection of his shorter fantasies assembled by Carter.

The book collects thirty short pieces by the author, with an introduction and afterword by Carter.

At the Mountains of Madness

At the Mountains of Madness is a science fiction-horror novella by American author H. P. Lovecraft, written in February/March 1931 and rejected that year by Weird Tales editor Farnsworth Wright on the grounds of its length. It was originally serialized in the February, March, and April 1936 issues of Astounding Stories. It has been reproduced in numerous collections.

The story details the events of a disastrous expedition to the Antarctic continent in September 1930, and what was found there by a group of explorers led by the narrator, Dr. William Dyer of Miskatonic University. Throughout the story, Dyer details a series of previously untold events in the hope of deterring another group of explorers who wish to return to the continent.

Beyond the Fields We Know

Beyond the Fields We Know is a collection of fantasy short stories by Irish writer Lord Dunsany, and edited by Lin Carter. The title is derived from a description of the location of the border of Elfland used several times in Lord Dunsany's best-known novel, The King of Elfland's Daughter. It was first published in paperback by Ballantine Books as the forty-seventh volume of its Ballantine Adult Fantasy series in May, 1972. It was the series' fourth Dunsany volume, and the second collection of his shorter fantasies assembled by Carter.

Dunsany is considered a major influence on the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, Ursula K. Le Guin, and others. Beyond the Fields We Know collects fifty-nine short pieces by the author, including stories, poems and a play, selected from some of his early collections. It incorporates the whole of his first book and collection The Gods of Pegāna (1905) and extended selections from his second, Time and the Gods (1906), and his poetry collection Fifty Poems (1929). An introduction and afterword by Carter frame the collection.

Carcassonne

Carcassonne (French: [kaʁ.ka.sɔn]; Occitan: Carcassona [kaɾkaˈsunɔ]; Latin: Carcaso) is a French fortified city in the department of Aude, in the region of Occitanie. A prefecture, it has a population of about 50,000.

Inhabited since the Neolithic period, Carcassonne is located in the Aude plain between historic trade routes, linking the Atlantic to the Mediterranean sea and the Massif Central to the Pyrénées. Its strategic importance was quickly recognized by the Romans, who occupied its hilltop until the demise of the Western Roman Empire. In the fifth century, it was taken over by the Visigoths, who founded the city. Its strategic location led successive rulers to expand its fortifications until the Treaty of the Pyrenees in 1659.

Its citadel known as the Cité de Carcassonne, is a medieval fortress dating back to the Gallo-Roman period, and was restored by the theorist and architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc in 1853. It was added to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites in 1997. Consequently, Carcassonne relies heavily on tourism but also counts manufacturing and wine-making as some of its other key economic sectors.

Dream Cycle

The Dream Cycle is a series of short stories and novellas by author H. P. Lovecraft (1890–1937). Written between 1918 and 1932, they concern themselves with the "Dreamlands", a vast, alternate dimension that can only be entered via dreams.

Edward Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany

Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany (; 24 July 1878 – 25 October 1957), was an Anglo-Irish writer and dramatist; his work, mostly in the fantasy genre, was published under the name Lord Dunsany. More than ninety books of his work were published in his lifetime, and both original work and compilations have continued to appear. Dunsany's œuvre includes many hundreds of published short stories, as well as plays, novels and essays. He achieved great fame and success with his early short stories and plays, and during the 1910s was considered one of the greatest living writers of the English-speaking world; he is today best known for his 1924 fantasy novel The King of Elfland's Daughter.

Born and raised in London, to the second-oldest title (created 1439) in the Irish peerage, Dunsany lived much of his life at what may be Ireland's longest-inhabited house, Dunsany Castle near Tara, worked with W. B. Yeats and Lady Gregory, received an honorary doctorate from Trinity College, Dublin, was chess and pistol-shooting champion of Ireland, and travelled and hunted extensively. He died in Dublin after an attack of appendicitis.

James Portnow

James Portnow is a writer, game designer, consultant, and the co-founder of the educational Youtube channel Extra Credits. He is known for his theories on socially positive design and has worked as a design consultant with Zynga and Riot Games.

Lin Carter's Simrana Cycle

Lin Carter's Simrana Cycle is a collection of fantasy short stories by American writer Linwood V. Carter, selected and edited by Robert M. Price. It was first published in hardcover, trade paperback and ebook by Celaeno Press in February 2018.The collection gathers together all twelve of Carter's tales set in his Lord Dunsany-inspired "dreamworld" of Simrana, some previously published and a few previously unpublished, including two newly completed by Robert M. Price and Glynn Owen Barrass. One story, previously published in two versions, "The Gods of Neol Shendis" and "The Gods of Nion Parma," is included in both forms. Appended are nine "Dunsanian" stories written as tributes to Carter and Simrana by Darrell Schweitzer, Gary Myers, Adrian Cole, Charles Garofalo, and Robert M. Price, along with some of the original stories that inspired Carter, eight by Lord Dunsany himself and one by Henry Kuttner.

List of works by Lord Dunsany

The catalogue of Edward Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany (Lord Dunsany)'s work during his 52-year active writing career is quite extensive, and is fraught with pitfalls for two reasons: first, many of Dunsany's original books of collected short stories were later followed by reprint collections, some of which were unauthorised and included only previously published stories; and second, some later collections bore titles very similar to different original books.

In 1993, S. T. Joshi and Darrell Schweitzer released a bibliographic volume which, while emphasising that it makes no claim to be the final word, gives considerable information on Dunsany's work. They noted that a "ledger" of at least some of Dunsany's work was thought to have existed at Dunsany Castle. It is believed that the curator at Dunsany Castle has compiled considerable writing and publication data.

The following is a partial list compiled from various sources.

Over the Hills and Far Away (short story collection)

Over the Hills and Far Away is a collection of fantasy short stories by Lord Dunsany, edited by Lin Carter. It was first published in paperback by Ballantine Books as the sixty-fifth volume of its celebrated Ballantine Adult Fantasy series in April, 1974. It was the series' sixth Dunsany volume, and the third collection of his shorter fantasies assembled by Carter.

The book collects a poem, two plays and thirty-four short pieces by the author, including several of his Jorkens stories, with an introduction by Carter. A poem by H. P. Lovecraft, in tribute to Dunsany, is also included.

Shub-Niggurath

Shub-Niggurath, often associated with the phrase “The Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young”, is a deity in the Cthulhu Mythos of H. P. Lovecraft. The only other name by which H. P. Lovecraft referred to her was "Lord of the Wood" in his story The Whisperer in Darkness.

Shub-Niggurath is first mentioned in Lovecraft's revision story "The Last Test" (1928); she is not described by Lovecraft, but is frequently mentioned or called upon in incantations. Most of her development as a literary figure was carried out by other Mythos authors, including August Derleth, Robert Bloch, and Ramsey Campbell.

August Derleth classified Shub-Niggurath as a Great Old One, but the Call of Cthulhu role-playing game classifies her as an Outer God. The CthulhuTech role-playing game, in turn, returns to Derleth's classification of Shub-Niggurath as a Great Old One.

Sidney Sime

Sidney Herbert Sime (1865 – 22 May 1941, often S. H. Sime) was an English artist in the late Victorian and succeeding periods, mostly remembered for his fantastic and satirical artwork, especially his story illustrations for Irish author Lord Dunsany.

Tales of Three Hemispheres

Tales of Three Hemispheres is a collection of fantasy short stories by Lord Dunsany. The first edition was published in Boston by John W. Luce & Co. in November, 1919; the first British edition was published in London by T. Fisher Unwin in June, 1920.

The collection's significance in the history of fantasy literature was recognized by its republication in a new edition by Owlswick Press in 1976, with illustrations by Tim Kirk and a foreword by H. P. Lovecraft, actually a general article on Dunsany's work originally written by Lovecraft in 1922, but unpublished until it appeared in his posthumous Marginalia (Arkham House, 1944).

The book collects 14 short pieces by Dunsany; the last three, under the general heading "Beyond the Fields We Know," are related tales, as explained in the publisher's note preceding the first, "Idle Days on the Yann," which was previously published in the author's earlier collection A Dreamer's Tales, but reprinted in the current one owing to the relationship.

The Sword of Welleran and Other Stories

The Sword of Welleran and Other Stories is the third book by Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany, considered a major influence on the work of J. R. R. Tolkien, H. P. Lovecraft, Ursula K. Le Guin, and others. It was first published in hardcover by George Allen & Sons in October 1908, and has been reprinted a number of times since. Issued by the Modern Library in a combined edition with A Dreamer's Tales as A Dreamer's Tales and Other Stories in 1917.

The book is a series of short stories, some of them linked by Dunsany's invented pantheon of deities who dwell in Pegāna, which were the focus of his earlier collections The Gods of Pegāna and Time and the Gods. One of the stories, "The Fortress Unvanquishable, Save for Sacnoth", was afterwards (1910) published by itself as a separate book, a now very-rare "Art-and-Craft"-style limited edition.

Time and the Gods (omnibus)

Time and the Gods is an omnibus collection of fantasy stories by Anglo-Irish writer Lord Dunsany. It was first published by Orion Books in 2000 as the second volume of their Fantasy Masterworks series. This omnibus contains all the stories from Dunsany's earlier collections: Time and the Gods, The Sword of Welleran and Other Stories, A Dreamer's Tales, The Book of Wonder, The Last Book of Wonder, and The Gods of Pegāna.

Victor Delhez

Victor Delhez (1902–1985), best known for his woodcut engravings, was born in Antwerp, Belgium, and died in Argentina.

Delhez was one of seven children. He studied at Antwerp's Royal Academy of Fine Arts from 1916-1918 and at the University of Leuven from 1918-1923, graduating as an agronomist with chemistry as his primary subject.

Delhez began exhibiting caricatures and surrealist work while in college. Taking up a role as manager of his family's car company, he continued his artistic interests, publishing a series of prints in 1925.

In 1925, Delhez's parents died in a road accident, and he subsequently moved to Argentina, working as a draughtsman and architect, and contractor, in Buenos Aires from 1926-1933. He then moved to Bolivia, before moving back to Argentina in 1940. He settled in Chacras de Coria and took a post as professor at the Academy of Fine Arts, National University of Cuyo.

While in Bolivia, Delhez produced a set of forty illustrations for the Gospels, and twenty-one for Lord Dunsany's "A Dreamer's Tales", while in correspondence with the author. The Gospel woodcuts are notable for using South American settings for the illustrations.

The sculptor Lorenzo Domínguez made a marble image of Delhez in the early 1940s.

Delhez became better known from the 1930s, with what is considered to be his best work beginning during his time in Bolivia. His major themes included the Gospels and the Book of Apocalypse, illustrations for various literary works including books by Dostoevsky and Baudelaire, a series of woodcuts entitled Architecture and Nostalgia, the Dance of Death series, illustrations for Juan Draghi Lucero's "Las Mil y Una Noches Argentinas" (One Thousand and One Argentinian Nights), portraits and self-portraits, and abstract works including the so-called Bagatelle-Linos. He was exhibited, either alone or in conjunction with other artists, in Europe, the United States, Canada, South and Central America, and Japan, including cities such as Brussels (his sisters arranging a show of his "A Dreamer's Tales" works), Antwerp (Plantin-Moretus), at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C., and at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Victor Delhez tended to produce short runs from his blocks, often eight copies of each print labeled as artist's proofs, which has left some of his work scarce in original form. Many of his works were intended for use as illustrations for literary works and are commonly known in their published format. A mid-1950s catalog of his work prepared in conjunction with an exhibit of his works in Breda, Netherlands includes more than 900 items, with an unknown number of additional works prepared during the final decades of his life. The catalog organizes Delhez's woodcuts into thematic categories.

Two books examining Delhez's artistic work were completed during his lifetime - Fernando Diez de Medina's 1938 study, "El Arte Nocturno de Victor Delhez", and a 1969 study by Guillermo Petra Sierralta, "Victor Delhez: Apocalipsis, Danza Macabre, Grabado en Colores".

Delhez has continued to receive attention in the years since his death. In 2014, Pope Francis (a fellow Argentinian) used a Delhez woodcut depicting the Nativity as the illustration for the Vatican Christmas greeting card. In 2015, two major exhibits of his works were held at the Museo de Artes Plásticas Eduardo Sívori in Buenos Aires, Argentina and at the Casa Municipal de Cultura in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. In 2016, two additional major Delhez exhibits took place at the Espacio Cultural Julio Le Parc in Mendoza, Argentina and at the FeliXart Museum in Drogenbos, Belgium. In 2015, scholars Roxana Jorajuria and Gabriela Menéndez presented a paper discussing Delhez as a pioneer Latin American modern artist at the Congreso Nacional e Internacional de Historia del Arte, Cultura y Sociedad, held at the Universidad Nacional de Cuyo in Mendoza, Argentina.

Delhez’s works are found in numerous museums, including more than 350 prints in the Royal Library of Belgium in Brussels, about 275 prints at the State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota in Bradenton, Florida, about 100 prints held by the Museum Plantin-Moretus in Antwerp, Belgium as well as works at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, at the Baltimore Museum of Art (which issued in 2014 a video blog concerning a Delhez print, Scherzo in Gold, from his Dance of Death series), and in museums in Argentina and other South American locations.

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