A Barnstormer in Oz

A Barnstormer in Oz: A Rationalization and Extrapolation of the Split-Level Continuum is a 1982 novel by Philip José Farmer and is based on the setting and characters of L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

The central character of the novel is Hank Stover, a pilot and the son of Dorothy Gale, who finds himself in Oz when his plane gets lost in a green cloud over Kansas in 1923. The Oz he discovers is on the brink of civil war; he encounters Erakna, the new Wicked Witch.

Farmer takes an unusual approach to the corpus of Oz literature; he depends almost solely on Baum's original Oz book and neglects its many sequels. This "originalist" approach to the Oz mythos is rare but not unique; a few other writers have taken similar tacks, including Roger S. Baum, the great-grandson of L. Frank Baum. In Barnstormer, Dorothy has made only one visit to Oz; when Hank Stover arrives, the Scarecrow still rules the Emerald City, just as at the end of Baum's first Oz book.

Since Farmer wrote for adults rather than children, there are elements of sex and violence in Barnstormer that are not typical of the Oz literature. As the book's subtitle indicates, Farmer indulges a rationalizing and explanatory bent: he treats Oz as a parallel universe in the science fiction vein. He attempts explanations and analyses of some of the fantastic elements in Baum's fictional world, including magic and talking animals. The book is also subtly anti-socialist, the character constantly points out the flaws of the near-communist Oz. Others have projected a gun control view on the book. Gunpowder and firearms are outlawed by the ruling magicians, as they believe it would cause an upset of power and allow their subjects to level the playing field.

Opinions of Farmer's contribution to the literature of Oz span the entire critical spectrum; Jack Zipes called the novel "splendid,"[1] while Katharine Rogers considered it "revision to the point of debasement."[2]

Farmer wrote several other books that take fresh views of famous figures of popular and pulp literature: A Barnstormer in Oz can be grouped with his Tarzan Alive: A Definitive Biography of Lord Greystoke (1972), Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life (1973), and The Other Log of Phileas Fogg (also 1973), among other works.

A Barnstormer in Oz
Barnstormer in Oz
First paperback edition
AuthorPhilip Jose Farmer
Cover artistDon Ivan Punchatz
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
SeriesThe Oz Books
GenreFantasy
Published1982 (Phantasia Press)
Media typePrint (Hardcover)
Pages278
ISBN0-932096-18-2
OCLC11336024
813/.54 19
LC ClassPS3556.A72 B3 1982

References

  1. ^ Jack David Zipes, Fairy Tale as Myth/Myth as Fairy Tale, Lexington, KY, University Press of Kentucky, 1994; p. 128.
  2. ^ Katharine M. Rogers, L. Frank Baum, Creator of Oz: A Biography, New York, Macmillan, 2002; p. 252.
Adaptations of The Wizard of Oz

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a 1900 children's novel written by American author L. Frank Baum. Since its first publication in 1900, it has been adapted many times: for film, television, theatre, books, comics, games, and other media.

Artistic language

An artistic language, or artlang, is a constructed language designed for aesthetic pleasure. Language can be artistic to the extent that artists use it as a source of creativity in art, poetry, calligraphy or as a metaphor to address themes as cultural diversity and the vulnerability of the individual in a globalizing world.Unlike engineered languages or auxiliary languages, artistic languages often have irregular grammar systems, much like natural languages. Many are designed within the context of fictional worlds, such as J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth. Others can represent fictional languages in a world not patently different from the real world, or have no particular fictional background attached.

There are several different schools of artlang construction. The most prominent is the naturalist school, which seeks to imitate the complexity and historicity of natural languages. Others typically follow a more abstract style, as the intent behind their construction differs.

Barnstorming

Barnstorming was a form of entertainment in which stunt pilots performed tricks, either individually or in groups called flying circuses. Devised to "impress people with the skill of pilots and the sturdiness of planes", it became popular in the United States during the Roaring Twenties. Barnstormers were pilots who flew throughout the country selling airplane rides and performing stunts; Charles Lindbergh first began flying in this capacity.

Don Ivan Punchatz

Don Ivan Punchatz (September 8, 1936 – October 22, 2009) was a science fiction and fantasy artist who drew illustrations for numerous books and publications, including magazines such as Heavy Metal, National Geographic, Playboy, and Time. He illustrated album covers, and provided the cover art for session guitarist Steve Hunter's debut solo album, Swept Away.

Punchatz was born in Arlington, Texas. In 1970, he started the SketchPad Studio there, where he trained a number of apprentices and came to be known as the "Godfather of Dallas Illustration." During 1993, id Software hired him to create the Doom video game package art and logo. The result was named the second best game box art of all time by GameSpy. His son, Gregor Punchatz, has worked on special effects for several movies, and also created monster sculptures for Doom.Punchatz suffered a cardiac arrest on October 11, 2009 and died in an Arlington hospital on October 22, 2009.

Dorothy Gale

Dorothy Gale is a fictional character created by American author L. Frank Baum as the main protagonist in many of his Oz novels. She first appears in Baum's classic children's novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) and reappears in most of its sequels. In addition, she is the main character in various adaptations, notably the classic 1939 film adaptation of the novel, The Wizard of Oz.

In later novels, the Land of Oz steadily becomes more familiar to her than her homeland of Kansas. Indeed, Dorothy eventually goes to live in an apartment in the Emerald City's palace but only after her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry have settled in a farmhouse on its outskirts, unable to pay the mortgage on their house in Kansas. Dorothy's best friend Princess Ozma, ruler of Oz, officially makes her a princess of Oz later in the novels.

Glinda the Good Witch

Glinda, also known as the Good Witch of the South, is a fictional character created by L. Frank Baum in his Oz novels. She first appears in Baum's classic children's novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900), and is the most powerful sorceress in the Land of Oz, ruler of the Quadling Country south of the Emerald City, and protector of Princess Ozma.

Land of Oz

The fictional Land of Oz is a magical country first introduced in the classic children's novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900).

Oz consists of four vast quadrants, the Gillikin Country in the north, Quadling Country in the south, Munchkin Country in the east and Winkie Country in the west. Each province has its own ruler, but the realm itself has always been ruled by a single monarch. After The Marvelous Land of Oz, this monarch is Princess Ozma.

Originally, Baum did not intend for The Wonderful Wizard of Oz to have any sequels, but it achieved a greater popularity than any of the other fairylands he created, including the land of Merryland in Baum's children's novel Dot and Tot in Merryland, written a year later. Due to Oz's worldwide success, Baum decided to return to it four years after The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was published. For the next two decades, he described and expanded upon the land in the Oz Books, a series which introduced many fictional characters and creatures. Baum intended to end the series with the sixth Oz book The Emerald City of Oz (1910), in which Oz is forever sealed off and made invisible to the outside world, but this did not sit well with fans, and he quickly abandoned the idea, writing eight more successful Oz books, and even naming himself the "Royal Historian of Oz."In all, Baum wrote fourteen best-selling children's books about Oz and its enchanted inhabitants, as well as a spin off-series of six early readers. After his death in 1919, author Ruth Plumly Thompson, illustrator John R. Neill (who had previously collaborated with Baum on his Oz books) and several other writers and artists continued the series. There are now over 50 novels based upon Baum's original Oz saga.

Baum characterized Oz as a real place, unlike MGM's 1939 musical movie adaptation, which presents it as a dream of lead character Dorothy Gale. According to the Oz books, it is a hidden fairyland cut off from the rest of the world by the Deadly Desert.The canonical demonym for Oz is "Ozite". The term appears in Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz, The Road to Oz, and The Emerald City of Oz. Elsewhere in the canon, "Ozmie" is also used. In the animated 1974 semi-sequel to the MGM film, Journey Back to Oz, "Ozonian" is used. The term "Ozian" appears in the script for the Royal Shakespeare Company's stage adaptation of the MGM movie and in the non-canonical modern work Wicked. "Ozmite" was used in Reilly & Lee marketing in the 1920s, which has suggested to some critics that "Ozmie" may have been a typographical error.

List of Oz books

The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) and relate the fictional history of the Land of Oz. Oz was created by author L. Frank Baum, who went on to write fourteen full-length Oz books. All of the Baum written books are in the public domain in the United States. Even while he was alive, Baum was styled as "the Royal Historian of Oz" to emphasize the concept that Oz is an actual place. The illusion created was that characters such as Dorothy and Princess Ozma related their adventures in Oz to Baum themselves, by means of wireless telegraph.

Phantasia Press

Phantasia Press Inc. was an American small publisher formed by Sidney Altus and Alex Berman publishing short-run, hardcover limited editions of science fiction and fantasy books. It was active from 1978 to 1989. The company was based in West Bloomfield, Michigan. The publisher specialized in limited quality first hardcover editions of authors prominent in the field, particularly Philip José Farmer, C. J. Cherryh, L. Sprague de Camp and Alan Dean Foster. Some of its offerings were true first editions; others, the first hardcover editions of works previously published in paperback. In a few instances there had been previous hardcover editions.

The press started publication with a reprint of Wall of Serpents (L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt) and then The Reign of Wizardry (Jack Williamson).

Authors published by Phantasia were Poul Anderson, Isaac Asimov (2 books), Steven Barnes, David Brin (2 books), Fredric Brown, Orson Scott Card, C. J. Cherryh (7 books), Arthur C. Clarke, Catherine Crook de Camp (2 books), L. Sprague de Camp (5 books), Harlan Ellison (2 books), Philip José Farmer (9 books), Alan Dean Foster (5 books), William Gibson, Stephen King, Larry Niven (3 books), Jerry Pournelle, Fletcher Pratt, Mike Resnick (2 books), Spider Robinson, William Shatner, Robert Silverberg, Jack Williamson (2 books), and Roger Zelazny.

Artists contributing cover art to Phantasia editions included Randall Asplund, Wayne D. Barlowe, George Barr (3 covers), Doug Beekman, David A. Cherry (7 covers), Alex Ebel (3 covers), Stephen Fabian, Frank Kelly Freas (2 covers), Kevin Eugene Johnson (6 covers), Eric Ladd, Paul Lehr (4 covers), Carl Lundgren, Jane Mackenzie, Chris Miller, Rowena Morrill (2 covers), Phil Parks, John Pound, Victoria Poyser (3 covers), Kirk Reinert, Romas, Alex Schomburg, Barclay Shaw (2 covers), Darrell K. Sweet, Vaclav Vaca, Ed Valigursky, and Michael Whelan.

Philip José Farmer

Philip José Farmer (January 26, 1918 – February 25, 2009) was an American author known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories.Farmer is best known for his sequences of novels, especially the World of Tiers (1965–93) and Riverworld (1971–83) series. He is noted for the pioneering use of sexual and religious themes in his work, his fascination for, and reworking of, the lore of celebrated pulp heroes, and occasional tongue-in-cheek pseudonymous works written as if by fictional characters. Farmer often mixed real and classic fictional characters and worlds and real and fake authors as epitomized by his Wold Newton family group of books. These tie all classic fictional characters together as real people and blood relatives resulting from an alien conspiracy. Such works as The Other Log of Phileas Fogg (1973) and Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life (1973) are early examples of literary mashup.

Literary critic Leslie Fiedler compared Farmer to Ray Bradbury as both being "provincial American eccentrics" who "strain at the classic limits of the [science fiction] form," but found Farmer distinctive in that he "manages to be at once naive and sophisticated in his odd blending of theology, pornography, and adventure."

Philip José Farmer bibliography

In a writing career spanning more than 60 years (1946–2008), American science fiction and fantasy author Philip José Farmer published almost 60 novels, over 100 short stories and novellas (many expanded or combined into novels), two "fictional biographies", and numerous essays, articles and ephemera in fan publications.

The Wizard of A.I.D.S.

The Wizard of A.I.D.S.: Aware Individuals Deserving Survival is a short musical play created by the AIDS Educational Theatre (now HealthWorks Theatre) in Chicago in 1987. The play, which parodies the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz, is an AIDS education piece that follows Dorothy Gale and her friends from the "Land of AIDS" as they battle the "Wicked Witch of Unsafe Sex" and learn how to prevent the spread of HIV. Along the way, the Scarecrow learns to use his brain to make good choices to avoid infection, the Tin Man finds it in his heart to feel compassion for people with the disease and the Cowardly Lion realizes the courage to face his fears about becoming ill. During and after the play, cast members distribute HIV-prevention literature and condoms to the audience.Aiming for an audience of teenagers and young adults, HealthWorks tours the piece to high schools and college campuses across the country, occasionally sparking controversy. Although Dorothy chooses abstinence as her prevention strategy, the play frankly discusses condom usage and the Wicked Witch is killed by being suffocated with a giant condom.

The Wizard of Oz (pinball)

The Wizard of Oz is a Jersey Jack Pinball, Inc. pinball machine designed by Joe Balcer and released in April 2013. It is the first US pinball machine with an LCD in the back box as well as the first one to have color on the monitor produced in the US since the Pinball 2000 games. Although it is not the first pinball machine with a LCD worldwide because MarsaPlay in Spain manufactured a remake of Inder's original Canasta titled New Canasta, with an LCD screen in the backbox in 2010. The Wizard of Oz is the first widebody pinball machine since 1994 and the first new US pinball machine not made by Stern Pinball since 2001. The pinball machine is based on the classic film version of The Wizard of Oz.

Canonical books
Locations
and elements
Characters
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