ATP World Tour Awards

This is a list of all the awards given by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) World Tour to players and others of particular distinction during a given season.

Player of the Year

The ATP Player of the Year award is presently given to the player who ends the year as world No. 1 in the ATP Singles Rankings.[1] In earlier years, this was not explicitly the case as the 1976, 1977, 1978, 1982 and 1989 the Players of the Year named by the ATP (listed below) did not have the No.1 ranking based on the ATP's point system at the end of that particular year. In those years, the number one ranking was held by Jimmy Connors (1976-78), John McEnroe (1982) and Ivan Lendl (1989).

Year Player Nationality
1975 Arthur Ashe  United States
1976 Björn Borg  Sweden
1977 Björn Borg (2)  Sweden
1978 Björn Borg (3)  Sweden
1979 Björn Borg (4)  Sweden
1980 Björn Borg (5)  Sweden
1981 John McEnroe  United States
1982 Jimmy Connors  United States
1983 John McEnroe (2)  United States
1984 John McEnroe (3)  United States
1985 Ivan Lendl  Czechoslovakia
1986 Ivan Lendl (2)  Czechoslovakia
1987 Ivan Lendl (3)  Czechoslovakia
1988 Mats Wilander  Sweden
1989 Boris Becker  West Germany
1990 Stefan Edberg  Sweden
1991 Stefan Edberg (2)  Sweden
1992 Jim Courier  United States
1993 Pete Sampras  United States
1994 Pete Sampras (2)  United States
1995 Pete Sampras (3)  United States
1996 Pete Sampras (4)  United States
1997 Pete Sampras (5)  United States
1998 Pete Sampras (6)  United States
1999 Andre Agassi  United States
2000 Gustavo Kuerten  Brazil
2001 Lleyton Hewitt  Australia
2002 Lleyton Hewitt (2)  Australia
2003 Andy Roddick  United States
2004 Roger Federer   Switzerland
2005 Roger Federer (2)   Switzerland
2006 Roger Federer (3)   Switzerland
2007 Roger Federer (4)   Switzerland
2008 Rafael Nadal  Spain
2009 Roger Federer (5)   Switzerland
2010 Rafael Nadal (2)  Spain
2011 Novak Djokovic  Serbia
2012 Novak Djokovic (2)  Serbia
2013 Rafael Nadal (3)  Spain
2014 Novak Djokovic (3)  Serbia
2015 Novak Djokovic (4)  Serbia
2016 Andy Murray  United Kingdom
2017 Rafael Nadal (4)  Spain
2018 Novak Djokovic (5)  Serbia

Doubles Team of the Year

The ATP Doubles Team of the Year award is given to the team that ends the year as world No. 1 in the ATP Doubles Team Rankings.[1]

Year Players
1975 United States Brian Gottfried
Mexico Raúl Ramírez
1976 United States Brian Gottfried (2)
Mexico Raúl Ramírez (2)
1977 South Africa Bob Hewitt
South Africa Frew McMillan
1978 South Africa Bob Hewitt (2)
South Africa Frew McMillan (2)
1979 United States Peter Fleming
United States John McEnroe
1980 United States Bob Lutz
United States Stan Smith
1981 United States Peter Fleming (2)
United States John McEnroe (2)
1982 United States Sherwood Stewart
United States Ferdi Taygan
1983 United States Peter Fleming (3)
United States John McEnroe (3)
1984 United States Peter Fleming (4)
United States John McEnroe (4)
1985 United States Ken Flach
United States Robert Seguso
1986 Chile Hans Gildemeister
Ecuador Andrés Gómez
1987 Sweden Stefan Edberg
Sweden Anders Järryd
1988 United States Rick Leach
United States Jim Pugh
1989 United States Rick Leach (2)
United States Jim Pugh (2)
1990 South Africa Pieter Aldrich
South Africa Danie Visser
1991 Australia John Fitzgerald
Sweden Anders Järryd (2)
1992 Australia Todd Woodbridge
Australia Mark Woodforde
1993 Canada Grant Connell
United States Patrick Galbraith
1994 Netherlands Jacco Eltingh
Netherlands Paul Haarhuis
1995 Australia Todd Woodbridge (2)
Australia Mark Woodforde (2)
1996 Australia Todd Woodbridge (3)
Australia Mark Woodforde (3)
1997 Australia Todd Woodbridge (4)
Australia Mark Woodforde (4)
1998 Netherlands Jacco Eltingh (2)
Netherlands Paul Haarhuis (2)
1999 India Leander Paes
India Mahesh Bhupathi
2000 Australia Todd Woodbridge (5)
Australia Mark Woodforde (5) (team article)
2001 Sweden Jonas Björkman
Australia Todd Woodbridge (6)
2002 The Bahamas Mark Knowles
Canada Daniel Nestor
2003 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan
2004 The Bahamas Mark Knowles (2)
Canada Daniel Nestor (2)
2005 United States Bob Bryan (2)
United States Mike Bryan (2)
2006 United States Bob Bryan (3)
United States Mike Bryan (3)
2007 United States Bob Bryan (4)
United States Mike Bryan (4)
2008 Serbia Nenad Zimonjić
Canada Daniel Nestor (3)
2009 United States Bob Bryan (5)
United States Mike Bryan (5)
2010 United States Bob Bryan (6)
United States Mike Bryan (6)
2011 United States Bob Bryan (7)
United States Mike Bryan (7)
2012 United States Bob Bryan (8)
United States Mike Bryan (8)
2013 United States Bob Bryan (9)
United States Mike Bryan (9)
2014 United States Bob Bryan (10)
United States Mike Bryan (10) (team article)
2015 Netherlands Jean-Julien Rojer
Romania Horia Tecău
2016 United Kingdom Jamie Murray
Brazil Bruno Soares
2017 Poland Łukasz Kubot
Brazil Marcelo Melo
2018 Austria Oliver Marach
Croatia Mate Pavić

Coach of the Year

The ATP Coach of the Year award is nominated and voted by fellow ATP coaches. The award goes to the ATP coach who helped guide his players to a higher level of performance during the year.[1]

Year Coach Coached Player(s)
2016 Sweden Magnus Norman Switzerland Stan Wawrinka
2017 South Africa Neville Godwin South Africa Kevin Anderson
2018 Slovakia Marián Vajda Serbia Novak Djokovic

Most Improved Player

The Most Improved Player of the Year award is voted by the ATP players from the nominees. The award goes to the player who reached a significantly higher ATP Ranking by year’s end and who demonstrated an increasingly improved level of performance through the year.[1]

Year Player Nationality
1973 Vijay Amritraj  India
1974 Guillermo Vilas  Argentina
1975 Vitas Gerulaitis  United States
1976 Wojciech Fibak  Poland
1977 Brian Gottfried  United States
1978 John McEnroe  United States
1979 Víctor Pecci  Paraguay
1980 not given
1981 Ivan Lendl  Czechoslovakia
1982 Peter McNamara  Australia
1983 Jimmy Arias  United States
1984 not given
1985 Boris Becker  West Germany
1986 Mikael Pernfors  Sweden
1987 Peter Lundgren  Sweden
1988 Andre Agassi  United States
1989 Michael Chang  United States
1990 Pete Sampras  United States
1991 Jim Courier  United States
1992 Henrik Holm  Sweden
1993 Todd Martin  United States
1994 Yevgeny Kafelnikov  Russia
1995 Thomas Enqvist  Sweden
1996 Tim Henman  United Kingdom
1997 Patrick Rafter  Australia
1998 Andre Agassi (2)  United States
1999 Nicolás Lapentti  Ecuador
2000 Marat Safin  Russia
2001 Goran Ivanišević  Croatia
2002 Paradorn Srichaphan  Thailand
2003 Rainer Schüttler  Germany
2004 Joachim Johansson  Sweden
2005 Rafael Nadal  Spain
2006 Novak Djokovic  Serbia
2007 Novak Djokovic (2)  Serbia
2008 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga  France
2009 John Isner  United States
2010 Andrey Golubev  Kazakhstan
2011 Alex Bogomolov, Jr.  United States
2012 Marinko Matosevic  Australia
2013 Pablo Carreño Busta  Spain
2014 Roberto Bautista Agut  Spain
2015 Hyeon Chung  South Korea
2016 Lucas Pouille  France
2017 Denis Shapovalov  Canada
2018 Stefanos Tsitsipas  Greece

Newcomer of the Year

The ATP Newcomer of the Year award is voted by the ATP players from the nominees. The award goes to the Next Generation player (player aged 21-and-under) who entered the Top 100 for the first time and made the biggest impact on the ATP World Tour during the season.[1] From 2013 to 2017, this award was named ATP Star of Tomorrow, and it was given to the youngest player who ended the year in the Top 100 of the ATP Singles Rankings. If two or more players in the Top 100 shared the youngest birth year, the higher-ranked player won the award.[2]

Year Player Nationality
↓ Newcomer of the Year ↓
1975 Vitas Gerulaitis  United States
1976 Wojciech Fibak  Poland
1977 Tim Gullikson  United States
1978 John McEnroe  United States
1979 Vincent Van Patten  United States
1980 Mel Purcell  United States
1981 Tim Mayotte  United States
1982 Chip Hooper  United States
1983 Scott Davis  United States
1984 Bob Green  United States
1985 Jaime Yzaga  Peru
1986 Ulf Stenlund  Sweden
1987 Richey Reneberg  United States
1988 Michael Chang  United States
1989 Sergi Bruguera  Spain
1990 Fabrice Santoro  France
1991 Byron Black  Zimbabwe
1992 Andriy Medvedev  Ukraine
1993 Patrick Rafter  Australia
1994 Albert Costa  Spain
1995 Mark Philippoussis  Australia
1996 Dominik Hrbatý  Slovakia
1997 Julián Alonso  Spain
1998 Marat Safin  Russia
1999 Juan Carlos Ferrero  Spain
2000 Olivier Rochus  Belgium
2001 Andy Roddick  United States
2002 Paul-Henri Mathieu  France
2003 Rafael Nadal  Spain
2004 Florian Mayer  Germany
2005 Gaël Monfils  France
2006 Benjamin Becker  Germany
2007 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga  France
2008 Kei Nishikori  Japan
2009 Horacio Zeballos  Argentina
2010 Tobias Kamke  Germany
2011 Milos Raonic  Canada
2012 Martin Kližan  Slovakia
↓ ATP Star of Tomorrow ↓
2013 Jiří Veselý  Czech Republic
2014 Borna Ćorić  Croatia
2015 Alexander Zverev  Germany
2016 Taylor Fritz  United States
2017 Denis Shapovalov  Canada
↓ Newcomer of the Year ↓
2018 Alex de Minaur  Australia

Comeback Player of the Year

The Comeback Player of the Year award is voted by the ATP players from the nominees. The award goes to the player who has overcome serious injury in re-establishing himself as one of the top players on the ATP World Tour.[1]

Year Player Nationality
1979 Arthur Ashe  United States
1980 Not given
1981 Bob Lutz  United States
1982 Jeff Borowiak  United States
1983 Butch Walts  United States
1984 Not given
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989 Goran Prpić  Yugoslavia
1990 Thomas Muster  Austria
1991 Jimmy Connors  United States
1992 Henri Leconte  France
1993 Mikael Pernfors  Sweden
1994 Guy Forget  France
1995 Derrick Rostagno  United States
1996 Stéphane Simian  France
1997 Sergi Bruguera  Spain
1998 Younes El Aynaoui  Morocco
1999 Chris Woodruff  United States
2000 Sergi Bruguera (2)  Spain
2001 Guillermo Cañas  Argentina
2002 Richard Krajicek  Netherlands
2003 Mark Philippoussis  Australia
2004 Tommy Haas  Germany
2005 James Blake  United States
2006 Mardy Fish  United States
2007 Igor Andreev  Russia
2008 Rainer Schüttler  Germany
2009 Marco Chiudinelli   Switzerland
2010 Robin Haase  Netherlands
2011 Juan Martín del Potro  Argentina
2012 Tommy Haas (2)  Germany
2013 Rafael Nadal  Spain
2014 David Goffin  Belgium
2015 Benoît Paire  France
2016 Juan Martín del Potro (2)  Argentina
2017 Roger Federer   Switzerland
2018 Novak Djokovic  Serbia

ATPWorldTour.com Fans' Favorite

The ATPWorldTour.com Fans' Favorite award is voted online by tennis fans from the top 25 singles players in the year's Race Rankings as of the rankings update after the US Open is concluded.[2]

Year Player Nationality
2000 Gustavo Kuerten  Brazil
2001 Marat Safin  Russia
2002 Marat Safin (2)  Russia
2003 Roger Federer   Switzerland
2004 Roger Federer (2)   Switzerland
2005 Roger Federer (3)   Switzerland
2006 Roger Federer (4)   Switzerland
2007 Roger Federer (5)   Switzerland
2008 Roger Federer (6)   Switzerland
2009 Roger Federer (7)   Switzerland
2010 Roger Federer (8)   Switzerland
2011 Roger Federer (9)   Switzerland
2012 Roger Federer (10)   Switzerland
2013 Roger Federer (11)   Switzerland
2014 Roger Federer (12)   Switzerland
2015 Roger Federer (13)   Switzerland
2016 Roger Federer (14)   Switzerland
2017 Roger Federer (15)   Switzerland
2018 Roger Federer (16)   Switzerland

ATPWorldTour.com Fans' Favorite Team

The ATPWorldTour.com Fans' Favorite award is voted online by tennis fans from the top 15 doubles teams in the year's Race Rankings as of the rankings update after the US Open is concluded.[2]

Year Players
2005 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan
2006 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan (2)
2007 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan (3)
2008 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan (4)
2009 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan (5)
2010 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan (6)
2011 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan (7)
2012 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan (8)
2013 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan (9)
2014 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan (10)
2015 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan (11)
2016 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan (12)
2017 United States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan (13) (team article)
2018 United States Mike Bryan
United States Jack Sock

Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship Award

The Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship award is unique as it is voted by the ATP players themselves from the ones nominated by the ATP. The award goes to the player who, throughout the year, conducted himself at the highest level of professionalism and integrity, who competed with his fellow players with the utmost spirit of fairness and who promoted the game through his off-court activities.[1]

Year Player Nationality
↓ ATP Sportsmanship Award ↓
1977 Arthur Ashe  United States
1978 Not given
1979 Stan Smith  United States
1980 Jaime Fillol  Chile
1981 José Luis Clerc  Argentina
1982 Steve Denton  United States
1983 José Higueras  Spain
1984 Brian Gottfried  United States
1985 Mats Wilander  Sweden
1986 Yannick Noah  France
1987 Miloslav Mečíř  Czechoslovakia
1988 Stefan Edberg  Sweden
1989 Stefan Edberg (2)  Sweden
1990 Stefan Edberg (3)  Sweden
1991 John Fitzgerald  Australia
1992 Stefan Edberg (4)  Sweden
1993 Todd Martin  United States
1994 Todd Martin (2)  United States
1995 Stefan Edberg (5)  Sweden
↓ Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship Award ↓
1996 Àlex Corretja  Spain
1997 Patrick Rafter  Australia
1998 Àlex Corretja (2)  Spain
1999 Patrick Rafter (2)  Australia
2000 Patrick Rafter (3)  Australia
2001 Patrick Rafter (4)  Australia
2002 Paradorn Srichaphan  Thailand
2003 Paradorn Srichaphan (2)  Thailand
2004 Roger Federer   Switzerland
2005 Roger Federer (2)   Switzerland
2006 Roger Federer (3)   Switzerland
2007 Roger Federer (4)   Switzerland
2008 Roger Federer (5)   Switzerland
2009 Roger Federer (6)   Switzerland
2010 Rafael Nadal  Spain
2011 Roger Federer (7)   Switzerland
2012 Roger Federer (8)   Switzerland
2013 Roger Federer (9)   Switzerland
2014 Roger Federer (10)   Switzerland
2015 Roger Federer (11)   Switzerland
2016 Roger Federer (12)   Switzerland
2017 Roger Federer (13)   Switzerland
2018 Rafael Nadal (2)  Spain

Arthur Ashe Humanitarian of the Year

The Arthur Ashe Humanitarian of the Year award is chosen by the ATP. The award goes to a person, not necessarily an ATP Player, who has made outstanding humanitarian contributions.[1]

Year Player Nationality
1983 John McEnroe  United States
1984 Alan King  United States
1985 Stan Smith
Margie Smith
 United States
 United States
1986 Kay McEnroe  United States
1987 Rob Finkelstein  United States
1988 Not given
1989
1990 Marie-Claire Noah  France
1991 John O'Shea  Ireland
1992 Arthur Ashe  United States
1993 Orville Brown  United States
1994 Paul McNamee  Australia
1995 Andre Agassi  United States
1996 Paul Flory  United States
1997 Nelson Mandela  South Africa
1998 Patrick Rafter  Australia
1999 Mac Winker  United States
2000 Richard Krajicek  Netherlands
2001 Andre Agassi (2)  United States
2002 Amir Hadad
Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi
 Israel
 Pakistan
2003 Gustavo Kuerten  Brazil
2004 Andy Roddick  United States
2005 Carlos Moyà  Spain
2006 Roger Federer   Switzerland
2007 Ivan Ljubičić  Croatia
2008 James Blake  United States
2009 MaliVai Washington  United States
2010 Rohan Bopanna
Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi (2)
 India
 Pakistan
2011 Rafael Nadal  Spain
2012 Novak Djokovic  Serbia
2013 Roger Federer (2)   Switzerland
2014 Andy Murray  United Kingdom
2015 Bob Bryan
Mike Bryan
 United States
 United States
2016 Marin Čilić  Croatia
2017 Horia Tecău  Romania
2018 Tommy Robredo  Spain

Tournaments of the Year

The Tournament of the Year awards are voted by the ATP players for the different categories: ATP World Tour Masters 1000, ATP World Tour 500 and ATP World Tour 250. The awards go to the tournament in its category that operated at the highest level of professionalism and integrity and which provided the best conditions and atmosphere for participating players.[1]

Year ATP World Tour Masters 1000 ATP World Tour 500 ATP World Tour 250
1986 Cincinnati Stuttgart
1987 Stratton Mountain Stuttgart
1988 Indianapolis Stuttgart
1989 Indianapolis Stuttgart
1990 Indianapolis Memphis
1991 Indianapolis Gstaad
1992 Indianapolis Scottsdale
1993 Indianapolis Scottsdale
1994 Indianapolis Sun City
1995 Indianapolis Tel Aviv
1996 Indianapolis Gstaad
1997 Indianapolis Kitzbühel
1998 Miami Dubai
1999 Miami Lyon & Scottsdale
2000 Miami Halle
2001 Monte Carlo Indianapolis Shanghai
2002 Miami Kitzbühel Båstad
2003 Miami Dubai Houston & Båstad
2004 Miami Dubai Houston & Båstad
2005 Miami Dubai Båstad
2006 Miami Dubai Båstad
2007 Monte Carlo Acapulco Båstad
2008 Miami Dubai Båstad
2009 Shanghai Dubai Båstad
2010 Shanghai Dubai Båstad
2011 Shanghai Dubai Båstad
2012 Shanghai Dubai Båstad
2013 Shanghai Dubai Queen's Club
2014 Indian Wells Dubai Queen's Club
2015 Indian Wells Queen's Club Doha & St. Petersburg
2016 Indian Wells Queen's Club Stockholm & Winston-Salem
2017 Indian Wells Acapulco Doha
2018 Indian Wells Queen's Club Stockholm

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Nominees Revealed For 2018 ATP World Tour Awards Presented By Moët & Chandon". Association of Tennis Professionals. 17 October 2018. Retrieved 1 November 2018.
  2. ^ a b c "Nadal, Federer Among 2017 Awards Nominees". Association of Tennis Professionals. 20 October 2017. Retrieved 1 November 2018.
2005 Rafael Nadal tennis season

The 2005 Rafael Nadal tennis season started in January. Nadal won eleven singles titles and one doubles title with Albert Costa in 2005.

2013 Roger Federer tennis season

The 2013 Roger Federer tennis season officially began on 14 January at the start of the 2013 Australian Open. This season saw Federer suffer a considerable decline in form, dropping five places to number 7 in the world, his lowest ranking in 11 years, and seeing his run of 36 consecutive grand slam quarterfinals ended by a second round defeat at Wimbledon. This year also marked the first time since 2002 where Federer did not reach a major final. His only title win of the season was a victory at the Gerry Weber Open in Halle, an ATP 250 event.

The decline in form can be largely attributed to the severe back injuries Federer suffered for much of the season, hampering his play from March through October. He first injured his back in the early rounds of Indian Wells and then re-injured it in the quarterfinals of Hamburg.

2016 Roger Federer tennis season

The 2016 Roger Federer tennis season officially commenced on 3 January 2016, with the start of the Brisbane International, and ended on 8 July 2016, with a loss in the semifinals of the Wimbledon Championships.

This season saw Federer suffer from a knee injury which sidelined him for the majority of the year. After having surgery, Federer returned but was hindered by a back injury which kept him out of the French Open, therefore ending his record of 65 consecutive appearances at Grand Slam tournaments.

On July 26 Federer shut down his season, not wanting to risk damaging his knee further. Federer would end the year at No. 16 in the ATP Rankings, marking the first time that he dropped out of the top 10 since 2002. Additionally, this was the first season since 2000 in which Federer did not win a singles title.

ATP Race

The ATP defined the ATP Race as "an easy-to-understand, simple-to-follow annual race from season start to season end. Every player starts at zero at the beginning of the year and the player who accumulates the most points by season's end is the World Number 1" and claims that the Race "is the mathematical method of ranking male professional tennis players on a calendar-year basis."

According to the ATP: "Every player, regardless of his performances in the previous year, starts with zero points. Players count 18 performances in their INDESIT ATP 2005 Race total. Players eligible to enter the Grand Slams and Tennis Masters Series events must count those events and their best five other results from the International Series events. The Tennis Masters Cup will count as an additional 19th tournament for the eight players who qualify."

ATP Rankings

The ATP Rankings are the objective merit-based method used by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for determining the qualification for entry as well as the seeding of players in all singles and doubles tournaments. The first rankings for singles were published on 23 August 1973 while the doubles players were ranked for the first time on 1 March 1976. Ranking points are awarded according to the stage of tournament reached, and the prestige of the tournament, with the four Grand Slams awarding the most points. The rankings are updated every Monday, and points are dropped 52 weeks after being awarded (with the exception of the ATP Finals, from which points are dropped on the Monday following the last ATP World Tour event of the following year.

Alexander Zverev

Alexander "Sascha" Zverev ([ˌalɛˈksandɐ ˈzaʃa ˈtsfɛʁɛf]; Russian: Александр "Саша" Зверев, IPA: [ɐlʲɪˈksandr ˈsaʂə ˈzvʲerʲɪf]; born 20 April 1997) is a German professional tennis player. He is the youngest player ranked in the top 3 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP), and was a permanent fixture in the top 5 throughout 2018. He has won ten ATP titles in singles and two in doubles.

Zverev is the reigning champion at the ATP Finals, making him the youngest winner at the year-end championship in a decade. Zverev is the only active player outside of the Big Four with three Masters titles. He has been praised by members of the Big Four as one of their potential successors. Rafael Nadal has called him a "clear possible future No. 1." Novak Djokovic has said, "Hopefully, he can surpass me."Zverev was born into a tennis family. His parents Irina and Alexander Sr. both played professionally for the Soviet Union and his older brother Mischa is also a professional who has been ranked as high as No. 25 in the world. Zverev is a former world No. 1 junior, and won one Junior Grand Slam singles title at the 2014 Australian Open. He had an early breakthrough on the professional tour as well, becoming one of the youngest Challenger title winners in history at the age of 17. As a teenager, Zverev won two ATP titles and also upset then world No. 3 Roger Federer on grass. At 20 years old, he was the youngest player to debut in the top 20 since Djokovic.

Association of Tennis Professionals

The Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) is a main men's tennis governing body.

It was formed in September 1972 by Donald Dell, Jack Kramer, and Cliff Drysdale to protect the interests of male professional tennis players, and Drysdale became the first President. Since 1990, the association has organized the ATP Tour, the worldwide tennis tour for men and linked the title of the tour with the organization's name. It is the governing body of men's professional tennis. In 1990 the organization was called the ATP Tour, which was renamed in 2001 as just ATP and the tour being called ATP Tour. In 2009 the name of the tour was changed again and was known as the ATP World Tour, but changed again to the ATP Tour by 2019. It is an evolution of the tour competitions previously known as Grand Prix tennis tournaments and World Championship Tennis (WCT).

The ATP's global headquarters are in London, United Kingdom. ATP Americas is based in Ponte Vedra Beach, United States; ATP Europe is headquartered in Monaco; and ATP International, which covers Africa, Asia and Australasia, is based in Sydney, Australia.

The counterpart organisation in the women's professional game is the Women's Tennis Association (WTA).

Chung Hyeon

Chung Hyeon (Hangul: 정현; Hanja: 鄭泫; Korean pronunciation: [tɕəːŋ çʌn]; born 19 May 1996) is a South Korean professional tennis player. He is currently the highest ranked South Korean and also the 2017 Next Gen Finals champion. As an unseeded player, he became the first Korean player to reach a Grand Slam semifinal at the 2018 Australian Open.

David Goffin

David Goffin (French pronunciation: ​[david ɡɔfɛ̃]; born 7 December 1990) is a Belgian professional tennis player whose career high ranking is world No. 7 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP). He is currently the highest ranked Belgian male and the first to reach the ATP top 10. Goffin has won four ATP titles, and has reached seven other ATP finals, most notably at the 2017 ATP World Tour Finals.

Goffin's breakthrough occurred during his first appearance in the main draw of a grand slam, at the 2012 French Open as a lucky loser. He reached the fourth round where he lost to Roger Federer in four sets. Goffin has reached the quarterfinals of the 2016 French Open and the 2017 Australian Open, losing to rivals Dominic Thiem and Grigor Dimitrov respectively. At the 2017 ATP World Tour Finals, Goffin defeated Dominic Thiem, world No. 1 Rafael Nadal and world No. 2 Roger Federer en route to the final where he lost to Grigor Dimitrov.

Hubert Hurkacz

Hubert Hurkacz (Polish pronunciation: [ˈxubɛrt ˈxurkatʂ]; born 11 February 1997 in Wrocław, Poland) is a Polish tennis player.

Hurkacz reached a career high singles ranking of 52 on 1 April 2019. As a junior Hurkacz reached the final at the boys' doubles Australian Open in 2015. In 2018, he qualified for the Next Gen Finals held in Milan, where he won against Jaume Munar and lost to Frances Tiafoe and Stefanos Tsitsipas.

ITF World Champions

The International Tennis Federation (ITF) designates a World Champion each year based on performances throughout the year, emphasising the Grand Slam tournaments, and also considering team events such as the Davis Cup and Fed Cup. Men's and women's singles champions were first named in 1978; the title is now also awarded for doubles, wheelchair, and junior players. It is sometimes named "ITF player of the year" award, alluding to similar other year-end awards in tennis.

List of career achievements by Novak Djokovic

This article lists various career, tournament, and seasonal achievements by Serbian tennis player Novak Djokovic.

Djokovic is a fifteen-time Grand Slam champion and five-time year-end World No.1. He is one of eight players to achieve the Career Grand Slam and the only one in tennis history to hold all four Grand Slams on three different surfaces at once. Djokovic is also the only player to win all ATP tour Elite tournaments.

Djokovic is widely viewed by many sports analysts, fans and media pundits as one of the greatest tennis players of all time, often rated alongside Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Pete Sampras and Björn Borg. He has reached 24 Grand Slam finals and played the final of each Grand Slam tournament at least four times. He has won 5 World Tour Finals titles, four of which were won consecutively from 2012 to 2015 (record).

Djokovic's 2011 season is considered as one of the greatest seasons by a tennis player in the Open Era. Djokovic won 10 titles on 3 different surfaces and defeated Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer a total of ten times collectively, going 10–1 against them. Djokovic went on a 43-match win streak and set a then record of 5 Masters titles won in a season. In 2015 Djokovic won three majors in one season for the second time, improved his record of most Masters won in a season by winning six titles, and finished the year winning his fourth consecutive World Tour Finals title. Djokovic also made the finals of all big tournaments he played in 2015 defeating 31 Top-10 players along the way (Open Era record) and setting an all-time ATP rankings record. Djokovic's 2015 is seen as the greatest season in the Open Era by many fans and analysts.

Djokovic's consistency on the ATP tour is matched only by Roger Federer. For almost 10 years, Djokovic lost only 3 times in Grand Slams before the quarter-finals, making 35 quarterfinals, 30 semifinals and 20 finals. In the same period of time, Djokovic participated in 81 Masters tournaments and made 66 quarterfinals, 55 semifinals and 42 finals. Djokovic has the records of 15 straight finals in a single season, streak of 11 Masters finals and 18 straight top-tier tournament finals. Djokovic is the first and only player since the 1973 ATP rankings were introduced to have accrued 16,950 points, more than the world number 2 and 3 combined.

Djokovic has won 32 titles in the ATP Masters tournaments, only one title behind Rafael Nadal who has the record. By 2018, Djokovic has won Mastres titles at all 9 venues where Masters tournaments are held, becoming the first and only player to achieve the "Career Golden Masters". As a result, he is considered to be the greatest and most accomplished player in ATP Masters history for his versatility and success in winning the Masters tournaments on a consistent basis.Djokovic is widely viewed as one of the greatest hardcourt players of the Open Era. He has won 10 hardcourt Major titles and an Open Era record of 24 Masters hardcourt titles.

Besides hard courts and grass courts, Djokovic is also a remarkable player on clay courts with some great achievements on clay. He won 13 titles on clay, including a French Open title and 8 Masters titles which is second only to Rafael Nadal's (known as King of Clay) record of 24. Djokovic is one of two players (with Robin Söderling) to defeat Rafael Nadal in French Open, and the only player to date to have defeated Nadal in Roland Garros in straight sets. He is also the only player to defeat Nadal in all three clay court Masters events, which he achieved in finals of Madrid (2011), Rome (2011) and Monte Carlo (2013). Djokovic is the player with the most clay-match wins over Nadal and the one who ended Nadal's consecutive run of 8 Monte Carlo titles in the 2013 final.

Djokovic is the only player to defeat Federer and Nadal in all four Grand Slams. He's also the only one to beat them in multiple Grand Slam finals, multiple Master finals and in the final of Year-End Championship. He is the only player to defeat Federer in two Wimbledon finals (2014–2015) and the only player to defeat Nadal in three different Grand Slam finals (Wimbledon 2011, US Open 2011 and Australian Open 2012, 2019).

List of career achievements by Roger Federer

Roger Federer has won an all-time record 20 Grand Slam singles titles and has reached a record 30 Grand Slam finals (10 consecutive, and another 8 consecutive – the two longest streaks in history), 43 semi-final appearances, and 53 quarter-final appearances. He is one of eight men to have won a career Grand Slam (winning all four Grand Slams at least once) and one of four players to have won a career Grand Slam on three different surfaces, hard, grass and clay courts. Federer has won 8 Wimbledon titles, an all-time record. He is one of only two male players to have reached 11 finals at a single Grand Slam event (Wimbledon). From 2005-2010 Federer astonishingly reached the finals in 18 out of 19 grand slams, winning 12 titles and 6 runner up trophies. He is the only male player to win 2 different Grand Slam tournaments at least 6 times (Australian Open, Wimbledon) and the only player to win 3 different tournaments at least 5 times (Wimbledon, Australian Open, US Open). He is the only player to win two Grand Slams five consecutive times at Wimbledon from 2003–07 and the US Open from 2004–08. Federer has spent 310 weeks as the No. 1 ranked player in the world (ranked No. 1 for 237 consecutive weeks), the most of any men's tennis player since the inception of these rankings in 1973.

Federer has won an all-time record 11 hard court Grand Slam titles. He is the only player to win 5 consecutive titles at the US Open (2004–08). Federer has won an all-time record of 70 hard court titles. Federer has won an all-time record 7 Cincinnati Masters 1000 titles. He has also won an all-time record 9 Swiss Indoors titles and has reached the final at the Swiss Indoors for a total of 14 years (2000–01, 2006–15, 2017–18) and 10 consecutive years (2006–15) and is the only player to ever achieve both feats in the Open Era in any tournament. Federer has also registered a 56-match win streak on hard courts which is the all-time record.

Federer's success does not hold strictly to hard courts, his most successful surface is grass where he has won an Open Era record 18 grass court titles including an all-time record 9 Halle Open titles and an all-time record of 8 Wimbledon titles. He reached an all-time record 7 consecutive Wimbledon finals from 2003–09 and is the only player to achieve this feat in the Open Era. Federer has the longest grass court winning streak in the Open Era as he won 65 consecutive matches on grass from 2003 to 2008 where he was beaten by Rafael Nadal in the 2008 Wimbledon final. Due to his success on grass courts, Federer is considered by some as the greatest grass court player of the Open Era having surpassed the likes of Pete Sampras (winner of 7 Wimbledon trophies and undefeated in finals), Björn Borg (won 5 consecutive Wimbledon finals), Boris Becker, John McEnroe, Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal due to his consistent record on grass and the number of titles/finals he has accrued.

Alongside his record on grass, Federer has been successful on clay courts. He has reached 5 French Open finals (being beaten in 4 finals by Rafael Nadal, who is classed by many as the greatest clay court player ever), and has won 6 Masters 1000 titles on clay from 16 finals. Federer won his first and only French Open title in 2009 when he also won Wimbledon thus achieving the "Channel Slam" alongside Rod Laver, Borg and Nadal. Federer has won 11 clay court titles from 26 finals (11 of his clay court finals losses have been to Nadal, against 2 wins). His consistency in his prime years on clay was surpassed only by Rafael Nadal, and Federer was widely viewed as the second greatest clay court player during Nadal's era in the French Open from 2005–11 when he achieved 1 quarterfinal, 1 semifinal, 5 runners-up, and 1 title (he succumbed only to Nadal in the semifinal and finals he lost).

Federer is the only player to register at least ten titles on clay, grass and hard courts, he has 70 hard court titles, 18 grass court titles, and 11 clay court titles. In his prime years, he won an unparalleled 11 Grand Slam tournaments (3 Australian Open titles, 4 Wimbledon titles and 4 US Open titles) of a possible 16 events from 2004 to 2007. He reached the finals of all four Grand Slam tournaments in the same calendar year in 2006, 2007, and 2009, joining Rod Laver (1969) and later joined by Novak Djokovic (2015). In the World Tour Finals, Federer has won 6 titles from 10 finals, both Open Era records, at the prestigious year-end tournament featuring the top-8 players in the year-end rankings. He has qualified for the tournament a record 14 consecutive years from 2002 through 2015. Following an injury enforced absence for 6 months in 2016, in which Federer did not play on the tour after his defeat in the semifinal of Wimbledon, he qualified second to Rafael Nadal for the ATP Finals for a record 15th time in 2017. It would be the first time Federer had won multiple Grand Slam titles since 2009.

Federer was selected by fellow players as winner of the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship Award 13 times (2004–2009, 2011–2017). Fans voted for him in 2018 to receive the ATPWorldTour.com Fans' Favourite Award for a 16th straight year (since 2003). Since his Grand Slam winning debut in 2003, Federer has won a record total of 37 ATP World Tour Awards.

Marco Chiudinelli

Marco Chiudinelli (born 10 September 1981) is a retired tennis player from Switzerland.

Novak Djokovic

Novak Djokovic (Serbian: Новак Ђоковић / Novak Đoković, pronounced [nôʋaːk dʑôːkoʋitɕ] (listen); born 22 May 1987) is a Serbian professional tennis player who is currently ranked world No. 1 in men's singles tennis by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP).Djokovic has won 15 Grand Slam singles titles, five ATP Finals titles, 32 ATP Tour Masters 1000 titles, 12 ATP Tour 500 titles, and has held the No. 1 spot in the ATP rankings for over 240 weeks. In majors, he has won a record seven Australian Open titles, four Wimbledon titles, three US Open titles and one French Open title. Following his victory at the 2016 French Open, he became the eighth player in history to achieve the Career Grand Slam and the third man to hold all four major titles at once, the first since Rod Laver in 1969, and the first ever to do so on three different surfaces. He is the first and only male player to have won all nine of the Masters 1000 tournaments.Djokovic is the first Serbian player to be ranked No. 1 by the ATP and the first male player representing Serbia to win a Grand Slam singles title. He is a six-time ITF World Champion and a five-time ATP year-end No. 1 ranked player. Djokovic has won numerous awards, including the 2012, 2015, 2016, and 2019 Laureus World Sports Award for Sportsman of the Year and the 2011 BBC Overseas Sports Personality of the Year award. He is also a recipient of the Order of St. Sava, the Order of Karađorđe's Star, and the Order of the Republika Srpska.

Rafael Nadal

Rafael Nadal Parera (Catalan: [rəf(ə)ˈɛl nəˈðal pəˈɾeɾə], Spanish: [rafaˈel naˈðal paˈɾeɾa]; born 3 June 1986) is a Spanish professional tennis player, currently ranked world No. 2 in men's singles tennis by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP).Nadal has won 17 Grand Slam singles titles, the second most in history for a male player, as well as a record 33 ATP Tour Masters 1000 titles, 20 ATP Tour 500 titles, and the 2008 Olympic gold medal in singles. In addition, Nadal has held the world No. 1 ranking for a total of 196 weeks. In majors, Nadal has won a record 11 French Open titles, three US Open titles, two Wimbledon titles, and one Australian Open title. Nadal has won 80 career titles overall, including a record 57 clay court titles. With 81 consecutive match wins on clay, Nadal holds the record for the longest single surface win streak in the Open Era.

He was also a member of the winning Spain Davis Cup team in 2004, 2008, 2009, and 2011. In 2010, he became the seventh male player in history and youngest of five in the Open Era to achieve the Career Grand Slam at age 24. He is the second male player, after Andre Agassi, to complete the singles Career Golden Slam. In 2011, Nadal was named the Laureus World Sportsman of the Year.

Roger Federer

Roger Federer (German pronunciation: [ˈrɔdʒər ˈfeːdərər]; born 8 August 1981) is a Swiss professional tennis player who is currently ranked world No. 4 in men's singles tennis by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP). He has won 20 Grand Slam singles titles—the most in history for a male player—and has held the world No. 1 spot in the ATP rankings for a record total of 310 weeks, including a record 237 consecutive weeks. After turning professional in 1998, he was continuously ranked in the top ten from October 2002 to November 2016. He re-entered the top ten following his victory at the 2017 Australian Open.

In majors, Federer has won a record eight Wimbledon titles, six Australian Open titles, five US Open titles (all consecutive, a record), and one French Open title. He is one of eight men to have achieved a Career Grand Slam. Federer has reached a record 30 men's singles Grand Slam finals, including 10 consecutively from the 2005 Wimbledon Championships to the 2007 US Open. Federer has also won a record six ATP Finals titles, 28 ATP Tour Masters 1000 titles, and a record 22 ATP Tour 500 titles. Federer is also the only player after Jimmy Connors to have won 100 or more career singles titles in the Open Era.

Federer's all-court game and versatile style of play involve exceptional footwork and shot-making. Effective both as a base-liner and a volleyer, his apparent effortlessness and efficient movement on the court have made Federer highly popular among tennis fans. He has received the tour Sportsmanship Award 13 times and been named the ATP Player of the Year and ITF World Champion five times. He has won the Laureus World Sportsman of the Year award a record five times, including four consecutive awards from 2005 to 2008 and the most recent one in 2018. He is also the only individual to have won the BBC Overseas Sports Personality of the Year award four times.

WTA Awards

This is a list with all the WTA Awards given by the Women's Tennis Association to players for achievements during the season or their career.

Grand Slam
Men's
Women's
Other

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