AFC Women's Asian Cup

The AFC Women's Asian Cup (formerly known as the AFC Women's Championship) is a quadrennial competition in women's football for national teams which belong to the Asian Football Confederation (AFC). It is the premier women's football competition in the AFC region for national teams. The competition is also known as the Asian Women's Football Championship and the Asian Women's Championship. 19 tournaments have been held, with the current champions being Japan. The competition also serves as a qualifying tournament for the FIFA Women's World Cup.

AFC Women's Asian Cup
AFC Women's Asian Cup
Founded1975
RegionAFC (Asia)
Number of teams8
Current champions Japan
(2nd title)
Most successful team(s) China PR
(8 titles)
2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup

Overview

The competition was set up by the Asian Ladies Football Confederation (ALFC), a part of the AFC responsible for women's football. The first competition was held in 1975 and was held every two years after this, except for a period in the 1980s where the competition was held every three years. The ALFC was initially a separate organisation but was absorbed into the AFC in 1986.

The competition has been dominated by countries from the Pacific Rim, with the China women's national football team having won 8 times, including a series of 7 consecutive victories.

The tournament frequency changed to every 4 years effective from 2014,[1] after AFC had announced that the Asian Cup will additionally serve as the qualification rounds of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.[2]

From 1975 to 1981, matches were 60 minutes in duration.[3]

Results

Year Hosts Final Third Place Match
Winners Score Runners-up Third Place Score Fourth Place
1975
Details
 Hong Kong
New Zealand
3 – 1
Thailand

Australia
5 – 0
Malaysia
1977
Details
 Republic of China
Republic of China[a]
3 – 1
Thailand

Singapore
2 – 0
Indonesia
1979
Details
 India
Chinese Taipei
2 – 0
India South

Western Australia
cancelled[b]
Hong Kong
1981
Details
 Hong Kong
Chinese Taipei
5 – 0
Thailand

India
2 – 0
Hong Kong
1983
Details
 Thailand
Thailand
3 – 0
India

Malaysia
0 – 0
(5–4) pen
[4]

Singapore
1986
Details
 Hong Kong
China PR
2 – 0
Japan

Thailand
3 – 0
Indonesia
1989
Details
 Hong Kong
China PR
1 – 0
Chinese Taipei

Japan
3 – 1
Hong Kong
1991
Details
 Japan
China PR
5 – 0
Japan

Chinese Taipei
0 – 0
(5–4) pen

North Korea
1993
Details
 Malaysia
China PR
3 – 0
North Korea

Japan
3 – 0
Chinese Taipei
1995
Details
 Malaysia
China PR
2 – 0
Japan

Chinese Taipei
0 – 0
(3–0) pen

South Korea
1997
Details
 China
China PR
2 – 0
North Korea

Japan
2 – 0
Chinese Taipei
1999
Details
 Philippines
China PR
3 – 0
Chinese Taipei

North Korea
3 – 2
Japan
2001
Details
 Chinese Taipei
North Korea
2 – 0
Japan

China PR
8 – 0
South Korea
2003
Details
 Thailand
North Korea
2 – 1 aet
China PR

South Korea
1 – 0
Japan
2006
Details
 Australia
China PR
2 – 2 aet
(4–2) pen

Australia

North Korea
3 – 2
Japan
2008
Details
 Vietnam
North Korea
2 – 1
China PR

Japan
3 – 0
Australia
2010
Details
 China
Australia
1 – 1 aet
(5–4) pen

North Korea

Japan
2 – 0
China PR
2014
Details
 Vietnam
Japan
1 – 0
Australia

China PR
2 – 1
South Korea
2018
Details
 Jordan
Japan
1 – 0
Australia

China PR
3 – 1
Thailand

Note: aet: after extra time

  1. ^ Competes as Chinese Taipei since 1979
  2. ^ The match was cancelled as Hong Kong team members have already booked the flight to leave Kozhikode before kickoff, otherwise they had to stay behind for further four days for another earliest flight to Hong Kong, which would have upset the team's schedule. Both teams were declared third place.

Performance by nation

Rank Nation Winners Runners-up Third Place Fourth Place Total
1  China PR 8 2 3 1 14
2  North Korea 3 3 2 1 9
3  Chinese Taipei 3 2 2 2 9
4  Japan 2 4 5 3 14
5  Australia 1 3 2 1 7
6  Thailand 1 3 1 1 6
7  New Zealand 1 0 0 0 1
8  India 0 2 1 0 3
9  South Korea 0 0 1 3 4
10  Malaysia 0 0 1 1 2
 Singapore 0 0 1 1 2
12  Hong Kong 0 0 0 3 3
13  Indonesia 0 0 0 2 2
Total 19 19 19 19 76

Participating nations

Team Hong Kong
1975
(6)
Taiwan
1977
(6)
India
1979
(6)
Hong Kong
1981
(8)
Thailand
1983
(6)
Hong Kong
1986
(7)
Hong Kong
1989
(8)
Japan
1991
(9)
Malaysia
1993
(8)
Malaysia
1995
(11)
China
1997
(11)
Philippines
1999
(15)
Chinese Taipei
2001
(14)
Thailand
2003
(14)
Australia
2006
(9)
Vietnam
2008
(8)
China
2010
(8)
Vietnam
2014
(8)
Jordan
2018
(8)
Years
 Australia 3rd 3rd 2nd 4th 1st 2nd 2nd 7
 China PR 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 3rd 2nd 1st 2nd 4th 3rd 3rd 14
 Chinese Taipei 1st 1st 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 3rd 4th 2nd GS GS GS GS 13
 Guam GS GS GS GS 4
 Hong Kong GS GS 4th 4th GS GS 4th GS GS GS GS GS GS GS 14
 India 2nd 3rd 2nd GS GS GS GS GS 8
 Indonesia 4th GS 4th GS 4
 Japan GS GS 2nd 3rd 2nd 3rd 2nd 3rd 4th 2nd 4th 4th 3rd 3rd 1st 1st 16
 Jordan GS GS 2
 Kazakhstan GS GS GS 3
 North Korea GS 4th 2nd 2nd 3rd 1st 1st 3rd 1st 2nd 10
 South Korea GS GS 4th GS GS 4th 3rd GS GS GS 4th 5th 12
 Malaysia 4th GS 3rd GS GS GS GS GS GS 9
 Myanmar GS GS GS GS 4
   Nepal GS GS GS 3
 New Zealand 1st 1
 Philippines GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS 6th 9
 Singapore GS 3rd GS 4th GS GS GS 7
 Thailand 2nd 2nd 2nd 1st 3rd GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS 5th 4th 16
 Uzbekistan GS GS GS GS GS 5
 Vietnam GS GS GS GS GS GS 6th GS 8

General statistics

As of 2018

Rank Team Part Pld W D L GF GA Dif Pts
1  China PR 14 70 57 4 9 348 33 +315 175
2  Japan 16 76 52 4 20 347 57 +290 160
3  North Korea 10 53 36 6 11 242 38 +204 114
4  Chinese Taipei 13 59 36 5 18 165 77 +88 113
5  Thailand 16 63 33 2 28 110 156 −46 101
6  South Korea 12 48 24 6 18 146 73 +73 78
7  Australia 7 36 18 6 12 64 41 +23 60
8  India 8 35 16 3 16 63 61 +2 51
9  Hong Kong 14 57 11 4 42 26 191 −165 37
10  Vietnam 8 27 9 0 18 32 80 −48 27
11  Singapore 7 27 7 1 19 21 115 −94 22
12  Uzbekistan 5 16 7 0 9 15 64 −49 21
13  Malaysia 9 34 5 3 26 20 161 −141 18
14  Indonesia 4 14 4 1 9 17 49 −32 13
15  New Zealand 1 4 4 0 0 11 3 +8 12
16  Philippines 9 31 3 1 27 14 180 −166 10
17  Kazakhstan 3 9 2 2 5 16 39 −23 8
18  Myanmar 4 14 2 1 11 14 47 −33 7
19  Guam 4 15 1 0 14 5 112 −107 3
20  Jordan 2 6 0 0 6 5 29 −24 0
21    Nepal 3 10 0 0 10 1 67 −66 0

See also

References

  1. ^ "Competition Regulations AFC Women's Asian Cup 2014 Qualifiers". Asian Football Confederation. Retrieved 25 July 2012. The AFC stages the AFC Women's Asian Cup 2014 (Qualifiers) (hereafter the "Competition") for the senior women's national teams once every four (4) years. (In Section 1)
  2. ^ "VFF AimTo Host 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup". Asean Football Federation. 5 October 2012. Retrieved 18 October 2012.
  3. ^ "Asian Women's Championship". Archived from the original on 2011-10-21.
  4. ^ "Newspapers – The Straits Times, 18 April 1983, Page 43". Retrieved 23 February 2012.

External links

1995 AFC Women's Championship

The Asian Football Confederation's 1995 AFC Women's Championship was held from 23 September to 2 October 1995 in Malaysia. The tournament was won by for the fifth consecutive time by China in the final against Japan.

2001 AFC Women's Championship

The 2001 AFC Women's Championship was a women's football tournament held in Taipei County, Taiwan (Chinese Taipei) between 4 and 16 December 2001. It was the 13th staging of the AFC Women's Asian Cup, consisting of fourteen teams.

2006 AFC Women's Asian Cup

The 2006 AFC Women's Asian Cup was a women's football tournament for women's national teams from countries affiliated to the Asian Football Confederation. It was the 15th installment of the AFC Women's Asian Cup.

Unlike the previous tournament which was held every two years, the tournament has been moved back a year to 2006. The structure of the competition has changed for this tournament, with a qualifying tournament and a separate championship tournament.

The four qualifiers of the sub-tournament (Vietnam, Chinese Taipei, Myanmar, Thailand) went on to compete for the Championship proper against the four automatic finalists (China, Japan, South Korea and North Korea). Australia were added to the final tournament following their switch from Oceania Football Confederation to the Asian confederation. The finals of the tournament were held in Australia in July 2006 - the hosting rights were originally given to Japan, but after Australia moved conferences, they were given the hosting rights. All matches in the main tournament were held in Adelaide.

The tournament also acted as Asia's qualifying tournament for the 2007 Women's World Cup. Two spots were available in addition to the automatic spot given to China as World Cup hosts. China won the tournament, beating hosts Australia in the final. Thus, Australia took the first qualifying spot, while North Korea defeated Japan in the third place play-off to take second place. Japan now play off with the third-placed team in the CONCACAF region, despite beating China in the group stages.

2006 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification

The 2006 AFC Women's Championship qualification is the qualification for the 2006 AFC Women's Asian Cup football competition. All matches were played at the My Dinh Stadium, Hanoi. The two top teams in each group qualified for the play-off stage.

2008 AFC Women's Asian Cup

The 2008 AFC Women's Asian Cup was played in Vietnam from 28 May to 8 June 2008. It was won by North Korea.

2008 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification

The 2008 AFC Women's Championship qualification is the qualification for the 2008 AFC Women's Asian Cup football competition. The matches were held from 24 to 28 March 2008. The AFC Women's Asian Cup is organised by the Asian Football Confederation.

2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup

The 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup was held from 19–30 May at the Chengdu Sports Center in China PR. The winners, Australia, runners-up, Korea DPR, and third-place team, Japan qualified for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.With this victory, Australia women's had become the first ever national team to win in two different confederations, having won the OFC Women's Nations Cup three times before. Their success was later followed by their fellow men's team at the men's tournament 5 years later.

2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification

The 2010 AFC Women's Championship qualification saw twelve nations attempt to qualify for the 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup football competition. The three winners of the second round groups joined five automatic qualifiers in the finals tournament held in China in May 2010.

This tournament also served as the first stage of qualification for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup for the Asian zone.

2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup

The 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup, the 18th edition of the competition, was a women's association football tournament competed by national teams in Asian Football Confederation (AFC). It served as the qualification for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup. It was played from 14 to 25 May 2014 in Vietnam.Reigning world champions Japan defeated the reigning Asian champions Australia 1–0 in the final to secure their first continental title.

2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification

The 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification saw 16 nations attempt to qualify for the 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup football competition. The four winners from all groups joined the four automatic qualifiers in the final tournament.

This tournament also served as the first stage of qualification for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup for the Asian zone.

2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup

The 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup was the 19th edition of the AFC Women's Asian Cup, the quadrennial international football tournament in Asia competed by the women's national teams in the Asian Football Confederation (AFC). It was originally scheduled to be held in Jordan between 7 and 22 April 2018, but later was changed to 6 to 20 April 2018.The tournament served as the final stage of Asian qualification for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the top five teams qualifying for the World Cup in France.Japan defeated Australia 1–0 in the final to win their second consecutive title. In the third-place match the same day, China defeated Thailand 3–1.

2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup Final

The 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup Final was a football match at the Amman International Stadium in Amman, Jordan which determined the winner of the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup. The final was contested between Japan and Australia, teams which were also the finalists of the previous edition held in 2014.

Japan defeated Australia 1–0 in the final to win their second consecutive title.

2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification

The 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification was the qualification tournament for the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup.A total of 21 teams entered the qualification tournament, which decided four of the eight participating teams in the final tournament held in Jordan. This tournament also served as the first stage of Asian qualification for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the top five teams of the final tournament qualifying for the World Cup.

Iraq women's national football team

The Iraq women's national football team is the female representative football team for Iraq.The team played its first international match in 2010. Their first participation in a major tournament will be the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification.

Japan women's national football team

The Japan women's national football team, or Nadeshiko Japan (なでしこジャパン), represents Japan in women's association football and is run by the Japan Football Association (JFA). It is the most successful women's national team from the Asian Football Confederation. Its highest ranking in the FIFA Women's World Rankings is 3rd, achieved in December 2011.The team were champions in the 2008 and 2010 EAFF Women's Football Championships, and won the gold medal in the 2010 Asian Games. Japan defeated the United States in the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup Final, thus claiming their first FIFA Women's World Cup title, becoming the first Asian team to do so and only the fourth women's world champions. It won silver medals at the 2012 Summer Olympics and the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, making it the only Asian team to have three combined medals from international championships. They also won the gold medal at the 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup. The team most recently won the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup and the 2018 Asian Games.

Kyrgyzstan women's national football team

The Kyrgyzstan women's national football team is the female representative football team for Kyrgyzstan.

Although formed immediately after Kyrgyzstan gained independence in 1991, the team played its first competitive match only in 2009, during the qualifiers for the 2010 AFC Women's Asian Cup.

Despite lack of experience, the team managed to progress to the second round of qualifiers, where it was knocked out by stronger rivals Vietnam and Hong Kong.

Not having enough financial support, Kyrgyzstan women's team did not manage to play a single friendly match until the next Asian Cup qualifiers, for the 2014 tournament, where the team took the last place in the group, losing every match.

Philippines women's national football team

The Philippines women's national football team is the women's national football team of the Philippines. It is controlled by the Philippine Football Federation, the governing body of football in the country.

The women's national football team of the Philippines was formalized in the 1980s. The Philippines has participated in the Women's Asian Cup, first participating in 1981 when the tournament was still known as the AFC Women's Championship. The Philippines hosted the tournament in 1999 in Iloilo and Bacolod. They had a hiatus from the continental tournament after taking part in 2003 with a qualification process being introduced in the 2006 edition. They returned to the AFC Women's Asian Cup in 2018 after qualifying in 2017. In that iteration of the tournament, they progress to the knockout stages for the very first time in their Asian Cup participation history.

In Southeast Asian football, the Philippine women's team has limited success in the AFF Women's Championship and Southeast Asian Games with their only honor being the third place finish at the 1985 Southeast Asian Games which saw only three teams participating in the women's football event.

The head coach of the national team since August 2018 is Marnelli Dimzon and is 74th in the women's FIFA ranking as of December 2018.

Syria women's national football team

The Syria national women's football team, is the national women's football team of Syria. Their best achievement was in 2005 when they finished third in the West Asian Football Federation Championship.

Thailand women's national football team

The Thailand women's national football team (Thai: ฟุตบอลหญิงทีมชาติไทย, RTGS: futbon hying thim chat thai) represents Thailand in international women's association football. Officially nicknamed the Chaba Kaew, the team is controlled by the governing body for football in Thailand, Football Association of Thailand (FAT), which is currently a member of the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) and the regional ASEAN Football Federation (AFF).

With one AFC Women's Asian Cup title, four AFF Women's Championship titles and five Southeast Asian Games gold medals, the team has a history as the most successful football team in Southeast Asia.

AFC competitions
Men's football
Men's club competitions
Women's football
AFC Women's Asian Cup
Tournaments
Qualification
Squads
Asia
Africa
North America,
Central America
and the Caribbean
South America
Oceania
Europe
Non-FIFA
Games
Worldwide
National women's football teams of Asia (AFC)
Southeast Asia (AFF)
Central Asia (CAFA)
East Asia (EAFF)
South Asia (SAFF)
West Asia (WAFF)
Former
Olympic sports
Non-Olympic sports

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.