AFC West


The American Football Conference – Western Division or AFC West is one of the four divisions of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The division comprises the Denver Broncos, Los Angeles Chargers, Kansas City Chiefs, and Oakland Raiders.

The division has sent teams to the Super Bowl sixteen times beginning with Super Bowl I vs. Green Bay. Currently, as of the 2017 season, the Broncos and Raiders are tied with the most Super Bowl wins within the division with 3 each; Denver and Oakland have appeared in the Super Bowl 5 and 2 additional times respectively. The Chiefs are 1-1, while the Chargers lost their lone Super Bowl appearance in Super Bowl XXIX.

AFC West
ConferenceAmerican Football Conference
LeagueNational Football League
SportAmerican football
Founded1960 (as the American Football League Western Division)
CountryUnited States
Teams
No. of teams4
Championships
Most recent AFC West champion(s)Kansas City Chiefs (11th title)
Most AFC West titlesLos Angeles Chargers
(15 titles)

Oakland Raiders
(15 titles)

Denver Broncos
(15 titles)

History

The division was formed in 1960 as the American Football League's Western Division. In 1970, as part of the new NFL's two-conference, six-division alignment, the AFL West entered the merged league more or less intact as the AFC West.

The original AFL West had four members – the Dallas Texans (who moved to Kansas City in 1963 as the Chiefs), Denver Broncos, Los Angeles Chargers (who moved to San Diego in 1961, then back to Los Angeles in 2017) and Oakland Raiders. These four teams have remained in the AFL/AFC West since its inception, and are currently the only teams in the division. Largely because of this, and the fact they have played each other twice a year for over half a century, the entire division is considered one very large and very heated rivalry.

The Cincinnati Bengals played the last two AFL seasons in the AFL West despite being further east than Houston, where the Houston Oilers played at the time and were members of the AFC East. The Bengals (along with the Oilers) moved to the AFC Central (formerly the NFL Century, now the AFC North) in 1970, instantly forming rivalries with the Cleveland Browns and the Pittsburgh Steelers.

In 1977, the Seattle Seahawks were added to the AFC West after spending their expansion season in the NFC West; they would move back to the NFC West in 2002. The first-year Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 1976 played as a member of the AFC West before being aligned into the NFC Central in 1977.

Each of the four AFC West teams won a division title in the first four years of the realignment – Oakland in 2002, Kansas City in 2003, San Diego in 2004 and Denver in 2005. It is the only one of the eight NFL divisions to have all of its teams win titles in the first four seasons of the North-East-West-South format.

ESPN's Chris Berman often calls this division the "AFC Smythe" due to its geographical similarity to the old Smythe Division of the NHL, now succeeded by the Pacific Division.

In the early and mid-2000s, the division was often cited as one of the NFL's "Toughest Divisions"[1][2][3] due partially to the home-field advantages of Sports Authority Field at Mile High, Arrowhead Stadium, Qualcomm Stadium and the Oakland Coliseum, although in 2008 the division was the NFL's weakest since the AFC Central in 1985 by sending the San Diego Chargers to the playoffs as division winners with an 8–8 record while the New England Patriots missed out at 11–5 after losing out on tiebreakers for both the AFC East and the wild-card. In 2010, the Raiders swept the entire division, going 6-0, but failed to qualify for the playoffs as they only won two non-divisional games.

The division was very weak in 2011 as well, when a loss by the Raiders in the last game of the season gave the Broncos the division title with only an 8-8 record. Only the NFC West in 2010 and the NFC South in 2014 have historically sent a worse division winner to the playoffs, when the Seahawks (themselves a former AFC West member) won that division with a 7-9 record and the Panthers won the NFC South division with a 7-8-1 record. Along with the AFC (formerly AFL) East, the AFC West is the oldest NFL division in terms of creation date (1960).

Division lineups

Place cursor over year for division champ or Super Bowl team.

AFL Western Division
1900s
60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69
Dallas Texans Kansas City Chiefs [A]
Denver Broncos
LA Chargers San Diego Chargers [B]
Oakland Raiders
  Cincinnati
Bengals
[D]
AFC West Division
1900s 2000s
70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01
Kansas City Chiefs
Denver Broncos
San Diego Chargers
Oakland Raiders Los Angeles Raiders [C] Oakland Raiders
  Tampa
Bay
Bucs
[E]
Seattle Seahawks[F]
AFC West Division
2000s
02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Kansas City Chiefs
Denver Broncos
San Diego Chargers Los Angeles Chargers
Oakland Raiders
     Team not in division      Division Won AFL Championship      Division Won AFL Championship, Lost Super Bowl      Division Won AFC Championship      Division Won Super Bowl
A Dallas Texans moved to Kansas City, Missouri and were subsequently renamed the Kansas City Chiefs (1963 season)
B Los Angeles Chargers moved to San Diego (1961 season) but moved back in 2017.
C Oakland Raiders moved to Los Angeles (1982 season). The team returned to Oakland for the 1995 season.
D Cincinnati Bengals enfranchised (1968 season). After 1970 merger with NFL, the team moved to the AFC Central.
E Tampa Bay was enfranchised in 1976. The Buccaneers moved to the NFC Central after their inuagural season, and departed for the newly formed NFC South after the 2001 season.
F Seattle Seahawks moved from the NFC West division (1977 Season). In 2002 they moved back to the NFC West.

Division champions

Season Team Record Playoff results
1960 Los Angeles Chargers 10–4 Lost AFL Championship (at Oilers) 16–24
1961 San Diego Chargers 12–2 Lost AFL Championship (Oilers) 3–10
1962 Dallas Texans 11–3 Won AFL Championship (Oilers) 20–17 (2OT)
1963 San Diego Chargers 11–3 Won AFL Championship (Patriots) 51–10
1964 San Diego Chargers 8–5–1 Lost AFL Championship (at Bills) 7–20
1965 San Diego Chargers 9–2–3 Lost AFL Championship (Bills) 0–23
1966 Kansas City Chiefs 11–2–1 Won AFL Championship (Bills) 31–7
Lost Super Bowl I (vs. Packers) 10–35
1967 Oakland Raiders 13–1 Won AFL Championship (Oilers) 40–7
Lost Super Bowl II (vs. Packers) 14–33
1968 Oakland Raiders 12–2 Won Western Division playoff (Chiefs) 41–6
Lost AFL Championship (at Jets) 23–27
1969 Oakland Raiders 12–1–1 Won Divisional playoffs (Oilers) 56–7
Lost AFL Championship (Chiefs) 7–17
1970 Oakland Raiders 8–4–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Dolphins) 21–14
Lost AFC Championship (at Colts) 17–27
1971 Kansas City Chiefs 10–3–1 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Dolphins) 24–27 (2OT)
1972 Oakland Raiders 10–3–1 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Steelers) 7–13
1973 Oakland Raiders 9–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Steelers) 33–14
Lost AFC Championship (at Dolphins) 10–27
1974 Oakland Raiders 12–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Dolphins) 28–26
Lost AFC Championship (Steelers) 13–24
1975 Oakland Raiders 11–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Bengals) 31–28
Lost AFC Championship (at Steelers) 10–16
1976 Oakland Raiders 13–1 Won Divisional Playoffs (Patriots) 24–21
Won AFC Championship (Steelers) 24–7
Won Super Bowl XI (vs. Vikings) 32–14
1977 Denver Broncos 12–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Steelers) 34–21
Won AFC Championship (Raiders) 20–17
Lost Super Bowl XII (vs. Cowboys) 10–27
1978 Denver Broncos 10–6 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Steelers) 10–33
1979 San Diego Chargers 12–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Oilers) 14–17
1980 San Diego Chargers 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Bills) 20–14
Lost AFC Championship (Raiders) 27–34
1981 San Diego Chargers 10–6 Won Divisional Playoffs (at Dolphins) 41–38 (OT)
Lost AFC Championship (at Bengals) 7–27
1982# Los Angeles Raiders 8–1 Won First Round Playoffs (Browns) 27–10
Lost Second Round Playoffs (Jets) 14–17
1983 Los Angeles Raiders 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Steelers) 38–10
Won AFC Championship (Seahawks) 30–14
Won Super Bowl XVIII (vs. Redskins) 38–9
1984 Denver Broncos 13–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Steelers) 17–24
1985 Los Angeles Raiders 12–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Patriots) 20–27
1986 Denver Broncos 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Patriots) 22–17
Won AFC Championship (at Browns) 23–20 (OT)
Lost Super Bowl XXI (vs. Giants) 20–39
1987 Denver Broncos 10–4–1 Won Divisional Playoffs (Oilers) 34–10
Won AFC Championship (Browns) 38–33
Lost Super Bowl XXII (vs. Redskins) 10–42
1988 Seattle Seahawks 9–7 Lost Divisional playoffs (at Bengals) 13–21
1989 Denver Broncos 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Steelers) 24–23
Won AFC Championship (Browns) 37–21
Lost Super Bowl XXIV (vs. 49ers) 10–55
1990 Los Angeles Raiders 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Bengals) 20–10
Lost AFC Championship (at Bills) 3–51
1991 Denver Broncos 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Oilers) 26–24
Lost AFC Championship (at Bills) 7–10
1992 San Diego Chargers 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Chiefs) 17–0
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Dolphins) 0–31
1993 Kansas City Chiefs 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Steelers) 27–24 (OT)
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Oilers) 28–20
Lost AFC Championship (at Bills) 13–30
1994 San Diego Chargers 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Dolphins) 22–21
Won AFC Championship (at Steelers) 17–13
Lost Super Bowl XXIX (vs. 49ers) 26–49
1995 Kansas City Chiefs 13–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Colts) 7–10
1996 Denver Broncos 13–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Jaguars) 27–30
1997 Kansas City Chiefs 13–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Broncos) 10–14
1998 Denver Broncos 14–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Dolphins) 38–3
Won AFC Championship (Jets) 23–10
Won Super Bowl XXXIII (vs. Falcons) 34–19
1999 Seattle Seahawks 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Dolphins) 17–20
2000 Oakland Raiders 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Dolphins) 27–0
Lost AFC Championship (Ravens) 3–16
2001 Oakland Raiders 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Jets) 38–24
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Patriots) 13–16 (OT)
2002 Oakland Raiders 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Jets) 30–10
Won AFC Championship (Titans) 41–24
Lost Super Bowl XXXVII (vs. Buccaneers) 21–48
2003 Kansas City Chiefs 13–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Colts) 31–38
2004 San Diego Chargers 12–4 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Jets) 17–20 (OT)
2005 Denver Broncos 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Patriots) 27–13
Lost AFC Championship (Steelers) 17–34
2006 San Diego Chargers 14–2 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Patriots) 21–24
2007 San Diego Chargers 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Titans) 17–6
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Colts) 28–24
Lost AFC Championship (at Patriots) 12–21
2008 San Diego Chargers 8–8 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Colts) 23–17 (OT)
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Steelers) 24–35
2009 San Diego Chargers 13–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Jets) 14–17
2010 Kansas City Chiefs 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Ravens) 7–30
2011 Denver Broncos 8–8 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Steelers) 29–23 (OT)
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Patriots) 10–45
2012 Denver Broncos 13–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Ravens) 35–38 (2OT)
2013 Denver Broncos 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Chargers) 24–17
Won AFC Championship (Patriots) 26–16
Lost Super Bowl XLVIII (vs. Seahawks) 8–43
2014 Denver Broncos 12–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Colts) 13–24
2015 Denver Broncos 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Steelers) 23–16
Won AFC Championship (Patriots) 20–18
Won Super Bowl 50 (vs. Panthers) 24–10
2016 Kansas City Chiefs 12–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Steelers) 16–18
2017 Kansas City Chiefs 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Titans) 21–22
2018 Kansas City Chiefs 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Colts) 31–13
Lost AFC Championship (Patriots) 31–37 (OT)
  • !The Oakland Raiders and Kansas City Chiefs tied for the regular season division title at 12–2. The Raiders won the ensuing playoff game to represent the West in the AFL Championship Game.
  • #A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games. Thus, the league used a special 16-team playoff tournament just for this year. Division standings were ignored, the Los Angeles Raiders had the best record of the division teams.

Wild Card qualifiers

Season Team Record Playoff results
1969# Kansas City Chiefs 11–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Jets) 13–6
Won AFL Championship (Raiders) 17–7
Won Super Bowl IV (vs. Vikings) 23–7
1977 Oakland Raiders 11–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (at Colts) 37–31 (2OT)
Lost AFC Championship (at Broncos) 17–20
1979 Denver Broncos 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Oilers) 7–13
1980 Oakland Raiders 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Oilers) 27–7
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Browns) 14–12
Won AFC Championship (at Chargers) 34–27
Won Super Bowl XV (vs. Eagles) 27–10
1982+ San Diego Chargers 6–3 Won First Round Playoffs (at Steelers) 31–28
Lost Second Round Playoffs (at Dolphins) 13–34
1983 Seattle Seahawks 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Broncos) 31–7
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Dolphins) 27–20
Lost AFC Championship (at Raiders) 14–30
Denver Broncos 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Seahawks) 7–31
1984 Seattle Seahawks 12–4 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Raiders) 13–7
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Dolphins) 10–31
Los Angeles Raiders 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Seahawks) 7–13
1986 Kansas City Chiefs 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Jets) 15–35
1987 Seattle Seahawks 9–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Oilers) 20–23 (OT)
1990 Kansas City Chiefs 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Dolphins) 16–17
1991 Kansas City Chiefs 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Raiders) 10–6
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Bills) 14–37
Los Angeles Raiders 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Chiefs) 6–10
1992 Kansas City Chiefs 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Chargers) 0–17
1993 Los Angeles Raiders 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Broncos) 42–24
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Bills) 23–29
Denver Broncos 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Raiders) 24–42
1994 Kansas City Chiefs 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Dolphins) 17–27
1995 San Diego Chargers 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Colts) 20–35
1997 Denver Broncos 12–4 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Jaguars) 42–17
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Chiefs) 14–10
Won AFC Championship (at Steelers) 24–21
Won Super Bowl XXXII (vs. Packers) 31–24
2000 Denver Broncos 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Ravens) 3–21
2003 Denver Broncos 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Colts) 10–41
2004 Denver Broncos 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Colts) 24–49
2006 Kansas City Chiefs 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Colts) 8–23
2013 Kansas City Chiefs 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Colts) 44–45
San Diego Chargers 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Bengals) 27–10
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Broncos) 17–24
2015 Kansas City Chiefs 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Texans) 30–0
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Patriots) 20–27
2016 Oakland Raiders 12–4 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Texans) 14–27
2018 Los Angeles Chargers 12–4 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Ravens) 23–17
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Patriots) 28–41

# In 1969, The Western Division 2nd place team played the Eastern Division 1st place team in an Interdivisional game.

  • A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games. Thus, the league used a special 16-team playoff tournament just for this year. Division standings were ignored, the Los Angeles Raiders had the best record of the division teams.

Total playoff berths

Updated through the 2017-18 NFL playoffs

Team AFL/AFC West Division
Championships
Playoff
Berths
AFC Conference
Championships*
AFL
Championships†
Super Bowl
Championships
Total
Championships‡
Denver Broncos 15 22 8 0 3 3
Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs 11 21 2 1 1 2
Oakland/Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders 15 22 5 1 3 4
Los Angeles/San Diego/Los Angeles Chargers 15 19 1 1 0 1
Totals 84 16 3 7 10

*Combines AFC Championships and AFL Championships won between 1966 and 1969
†AFL Championships won prior to Super Bowl I (1960–1965)
‡Combined Super Bowl championships and AFL Championships won prior to Super Bowl I in 1967

Season results

(#) Denotes team that won the Super Bowl
(#) Denotes team that won the AFC Championship
(#) Denotes team that won the AFL Championship
(#) Denotes team that qualified for the NFL Playoffs or AFL Playoffs
Season Team (record)
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
AFL Western
1960 L.A. Chargers (10–4) Dal. Texans (8–6) Oakland (6–8) Denver (4–9–1)
1961 San Diego (12–2) Dal. Texans (6–8) Denver (3–11) Oakland (2–12)
1962 Dal. Texans (11–3) Denver (7–7) San Diego (4–10) Oakland (1–13)
1963 San Diego (11–3) Oakland (10–4) Kansas City (5–7–2) Denver (2–11–1)
1964 San Diego (8–5–1) Kansas City (7–7) Oakland (5–7–2) Denver (2–11–1)
1965 San Diego (9–2–3) Oakland (8–5–1) Kansas City (7–5–2) Denver (4–10)
1966 Kansas City (11–2–1) Oakland (8–5–1) San Diego (7–6–1) Denver (4–10)
1967 Oakland (13–1) Kansas City (9–5) San Diego (8–5–1) Denver (3–11)
1968 Oakland (12–2) Kansas City (12–2) San Diego (9–5) Denver (5–9) Cincinnati (3–11)
1969 Oakland (12–1–1) Kansas City (11–3) San Diego (8–6) Denver (5–8–1) Cincinnati (4–9–1)
AFC West
1970 Oakland (8–4–2) Kansas City (7–5–2) San Diego (5–6–3) Denver (5–8–1)
1971 Kansas City (10–3–1) Oakland (8–4–2) San Diego (6–8) Denver (4–9–1)
1972 Oakland (10–3–1) Kansas City (8–6) Denver (5–9) San Diego (4–9–1)
1973 Oakland (9–4–1) Kansas City (7–5–2) Denver (7–5–2) San Diego (2–11–1)
1974 Oakland (12–2) Denver (7–6–1) Kansas City (5–9) San Diego (5–9)
1975 (2) Oakland (11–3) Denver (6–8) Kansas City (5–9) San Diego (2–12)
1976 (1) Oakland (13–1) Denver (9–5) San Diego (6–8) Kansas City (5–9) Tampa Bay (0–14)
1977 (1) Denver (12–2) (4) Oakland (11–3) San Diego (7–7) Seattle (5–9) Kansas City (2–12)
1978 (3) Denver (10–6) Oakland (9–7) Seattle (9–7) San Diego (9–7) Kansas City (4–12)
1979 (1) San Diego (12–4) (5) Denver (10–6) Seattle (9–7) Oakland (9–7) Kansas City (7–9)
1980 (1) San Diego (11–5) (4) Oakland (11–5) Kansas City (8–8) Denver (8–8) Seattle (4–12)
1981 (3) San Diego (10–6) Denver (10–6) Kansas City (9–7) Oakland (7–9) Seattle (6–10)
1982^ (1) L.A. Raiders (8–1) (5) San Diego (6–3) Seattle (4–5) Kansas City (3–6) Denver (2–7)
1983 (1) L.A. Raiders (12–4) (4) Seattle (9–7) (5) Denver (9–7) San Diego (6–10) Kansas City (6–10)
1984 (2) Denver (13–3) (4) Seattle (12–4) (5) L.A. Raiders (11–5) Kansas City (8–8) San Diego (7–9)
1985 (1) L.A. Raiders (12–4) Denver (11–5) Seattle (8–8) San Diego (8–8) Kansas City (6–10)
1986 (2) Denver (11–5) (5) Kansas City (10–6) Seattle (10–6) L.A. Raiders (8–8) San Diego (4–12)
1987 (1) Denver (10–4–1) (5) Seattle (9–6) San Diego (8–7) L.A. Raiders (5–10) Kansas City (4–11)
1988 (3) Seattle (9–7) Denver (8–8) L.A. Raiders (7–9) San Diego (6–10) Kansas City (4–11–1)
1989 (1) Denver (11–5) Kansas City (8–7–1) L.A. Raiders (8–8) Seattle (7–9) San Diego (6–10)
1990 (2) L.A. Raiders (12–4) (5) Kansas City (11–5) Seattle (9–7) San Diego (6–10) Denver (5–11)
1991 (2) Denver (12–4) (4) Kansas City (10–6) (5) L.A. Raiders (9–7) Seattle (7–9) San Diego (4–12)
1992 (3) San Diego (11–5) (6) Kansas City (10–6) Denver (8–8) L.A. Raiders (7–9) Seattle (2–14)
1993 (3) Kansas City (11–5) (4) L.A. Raiders (10–6) (5) Denver (9–7) San Diego (8–8) Seattle (6–10)
1994 (2) San Diego (11–5) (6) Kansas City (9–7) L.A. Raiders (9–7) Denver (7–9) Seattle (6–10)
1995 (1) Kansas City (13–3) (4) San Diego (9–7) Seattle (8–8) Denver (8–8) Oakland (8–8)
1996 (1) Denver (13–3) Kansas City (9–7) San Diego (8–8) Oakland (7–9) Seattle (7–9)
1997 (1) Kansas City (13–3) (4) Denver (12–4) Seattle (8–8) Oakland (4–12) San Diego (4–12)
1998 (1) Denver (14–2) Oakland (8–8) Seattle (8–8) Kansas City (7–9) San Diego (5–11)
1999 (3) Seattle (9–7) Kansas City (9–7) San Diego (8–8) Oakland (8–8) Denver (6–10)
2000 (2) Oakland (12–4) (5) Denver (11–5) Kansas City (7–9) Seattle (6–10) San Diego (1–15)
2001 (3) Oakland (10–6) Seattle (9–7) Denver (8–8) Kansas City (6–10) San Diego (5–11)
2002 (1) Oakland (11–5) Denver (9–7) San Diego (8–8) Kansas City (8–8)
2003 (2) Kansas City (13–3) (6) Denver (10–6) Oakland (4–12) San Diego (4–12)
2004 (4) San Diego (12–4) (6) Denver (10–6) Kansas City (7–9) Oakland (5–11)
2005 (2) Denver (13–3) Kansas City (10–6) San Diego (9–7) Oakland (4–12)
2006 (1) San Diego (14–2) (6) Kansas City (9–7) Denver (9–7) Oakland (2–14)
2007 (3) San Diego (11–5) Denver (7–9) Kansas City (4–12) Oakland (4–12)
2008 (4) San Diego (8–8) Denver (8–8) Oakland (5–11) Kansas City (2–14)
2009 (2) San Diego (13–3) Denver (8–8) Oakland (5–11) Kansas City (4–12)
2010 (4) Kansas City (10–6) San Diego (9–7) Oakland (8–8) Denver (4–12)
2011 (4) Denver (8–8) San Diego (8–8) Oakland (8–8) Kansas City (7–9)
2012 (1) Denver (13–3) San Diego (7–9) Oakland (4–12) Kansas City (2–14)
2013 (1) Denver (13–3) (5) Kansas City (11–5) (6) San Diego (9–7) Oakland (4–12)
2014 (2) Denver (12–4) Kansas City (9–7) San Diego (9–7) Oakland (3–13)
2015 (1) Denver (12–4) (5) Kansas City (11–5) Oakland (7–9) San Diego (4–12)
2016 (2) Kansas City (12–4) (5) Oakland (12–4) Denver (9–7) San Diego (5–11)
2017 (4) Kansas City (10–6) L.A. Chargers (9–7) Oakland (6–10) Denver (5–11)
2018 (1) Kansas City (12–4) (5) L.A. Chargers (12–4) Denver (6–10) Oakland (4–12)

See also

References

  1. ^ "AFC West showing off its muscle - USATODAY.com". www.usatoday.com.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 1, 2005. Retrieved April 22, 2009.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on November 21, 2006. Retrieved April 22, 2009.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
1978 Denver Broncos season

The 1978 Denver Broncos season was the team's 19th year in professional football and its ninth with the National Football League (NFL). The team finished first in the AFC West, and made the playoffs for the second straight season. The season ended with a playoff loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers, whom they had loss to in the last game in the season at Mile High Stadium.

The offense finished 15th in the league in scoring offense, while the defense finished 2nd in points allowed and 6th in yards allowed. This season is notable for featuring coach Bill Belichick as a defense/special teams assistant. He would go on to become one of the greatest head coaches of all time.

1987 Denver Broncos season

The 1987 Denver Broncos season was the team's 28th year in professional football and its 18th with the National Football League (NFL). Games scheduled during the third week of the season were cancelled, and games played from weeks 4 to 6 were played with replacement teams. The Broncos finished first in the AFC West, and were AFC Champions for the second straight year. Quarterback John Elway was voted league MVP for 1987.

1992 San Diego Chargers season

The 1992 San Diego Chargers season was the team's 33rd season, their 32nd in San Diego, and 23rd in the National Football League.

The Chargers began with the team trying to improve on their 4–12 record in 1991. Bobby Ross began his first season as the team's head coach, after having spent the previous five years as a college coach at Georgia Tech. The team made the playoffs for the first time in ten years. The Chargers would lose their first four games of the season, but would rally to an 11–5 finish to the season, clinching the AFC West title, and becoming the first (and to this day, only) NFL team to start 0–4 and still make the playoffs.

1995 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1995 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 26th season in the National Football League, the 33rd as the Kansas City Chiefs and the 36th overall. The team improved on their 9-7 from 1994 and finished the regular season with a 13–3 record and the AFC West division championship, However, the Chiefs suffered a detrimental loss in the 1995-96 AFC playoffs when Placekicker Lin Elliott missed three crucial field goals, which gave the Indianapolis Colts an upset win.

1997 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1997 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 28th season in the National Football League, and the 38th overall.

The Chiefs finished with a 13–3 record and as AFC West division champions. The season is best remembered for the Rich Gannon–Elvis Grbac quarterback controversy which brewed throughout the entire season and arguably cost the Chiefs a victory in the playoffs. The Chiefs were beaten by division rival and eventual Super Bowl champions, the Denver Broncos, in the 1998 playoffs. 1997 was the final season that the Chiefs would appear in the playoffs during the 1990s and for the next several seasons, they fell out of contention. They would return to the playoffs in 2003.

This was the last season that Marty Schottenheimer would coach the team into the playoffs, with the loss to Denver in the Divisional round 14-10 capping off many years of disappointing playoff losses. This was also the final season for future Hall of Fame running back Marcus Allen.

2003 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2003 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 34th season in the National Football League, the 44th overall and the third under head coach Dick Vermeil.

The season resulted in a 13–3 winning record, beginning with a nine-game winning streak—the franchise's best start in their 40-year history. The Chiefs won the AFC West and clinched the second seed in the playoffs. Kansas City lost in an offensive shootout at home in the AFC Divisional Playoffs to the Indianapolis Colts 38–31, a game noted for involving no punts from either team's kicking squad.

The season is best remembered for the Chiefs' record-breaking offense. On December 28, running back Priest Holmes broke Marshall Faulk's single-season rushing touchdown record by scoring his 27th rushing touchdown against the Chicago Bears. Quarterback Trent Green threw for 4,000 yards and kick returner Dante Hall returned four kicks for touchdowns. However, the weak Chiefs defense would prove to be too big of weakness, as they failed to stop the Colts in the 2003-04 playoffs.

Art Shell

Arthur Lee Shell Jr. (born November 26, 1946) is an American former collegiate and professional football player in the American Football League and later in the National Football League, a Hall of Fame offensive tackle, and a two-time former head coach of the Oakland Raiders. He holds the distinction of becoming the second African-American head coach in the history of professional football, and the first in the sport's modern era. Shell was inducted to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2013 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1989.

Broncos–Chargers rivalry

The Broncos–Chargers rivalry is a rivalry between the Denver Broncos and Los Angeles Chargers in the National Football League's AFC West division. Since the American Football League was established in 1960, the Broncos and the Chargers have shared the same division, first being the AFL Western Conference, and since the AFL–NFL merger, the AFC West.

The Broncos lead the overall series 66–52–1. The teams have met once in the playoffs, a 24–17 Broncos win in the 2013 AFC Division Round.

Chargers–Raiders rivalry

The Chargers–Raiders rivalry is a rivalry between the Los Angeles Chargers and Oakland Raiders in the National Football League's AFC West division. Since the American Football League was established in 1960, the Chargers and the Raiders have shared the same division, first being the AFL Western Conference, and since the AFL–NFL merger, the AFC West.

History of the San Diego Chargers

The professional American football team now known as the Los Angeles Chargers previously played in San Diego, California as the San Diego Chargers from 1961 to 2017 before relocating back to Los Angeles where the team played their inaugural 1960. The Chargers franchise relocated from Los Angeles to San Diego in 1961. The Chargers' first home game in San Diego was at Balboa Stadium against the Oakland Raiders on September 17, 1961. Their last game as a San Diego-based club was played at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego on January 1, 2017 against the Kansas City Chiefs, who defeated the host Chargers, 30–13.

List of Denver Broncos seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Denver Broncos, an American football franchise based in Denver, Colorado. The Broncos are members of the West division of the American Football Conference (AFC) of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents their season-by-season records from 1960 to the present day, including post-season records, and league awards for individual players and head coaches. As of the end of the 2017 season, Denver has completed 58 seasons (playing in over 900 combined regular season and playoff games), and after recently winning the AFC West five consecutive years (2011-15), and Super Bowl 50 in February 2016, has missed the playoffs in its last two.

The Broncos franchise was founded on August 14, 1959, by Bob Howsam and played their first season in 1960, in Denver, Colorado as part of the original American Football League (AFL). The team joined the NFL in 1970 as a result of the AFL–NFL merger.The franchise has experienced three major periods of success. The first was from 1976 to 1981, when the Broncos did not have a losing season (a season when the team has more losses than wins), and won two AFC West division titles, and one AFC championship. The second began in 1983 and ended in 1998. During this period, the Broncos had just two losing seasons, were AFC champions five times and were Super Bowl champions for two consecutive years. This second period of success is best remembered for John Elway being the team's quarterback. The most recent run of success, began in 2011, through their 2015 reign as Super Bowl Champions. The five-year stretch was primarily spearheaded by the 2012 free agent acquisition of the then 4 time League MVP former Indianapolis Colts quarterback Peyton Manning, and included five AFC West titles, two AFC championships, and in 2015, a 24–10 victory in Super Bowl 50 over the Carolina Panthers. The Broncos have also experienced one notable period of deterioration. From their inaugural season in 1960 until 1975, they did not make either the AFL playoffs or NFL playoffs and had just two winning seasons. The Broncos were the only charter AFL franchise to never have a winning season during the AFL's ten years of existence (although the team finished at 7-7 in 1962), with their first winning season not occurring until 1973, their fourth year as a member of the NFL's AFC. They also experienced their two seasons with the fewest wins ever, winning just two of 14 games in both 1963 and 1964.The Broncos have been AFC West champions 15 times, having won the division the last five consecutive seasons (2011 to 2015) prior to 2016, and have also earned wild card berths into the playoffs seven times, for a total of 22 playoff appearances. They have been conference champions eight times (tied with the Pittsburgh Steelers, and two behind the New England Patriots who have the most AFC championships) and Super Bowl champions thrice.

List of Kansas City Chiefs seasons

The Kansas City Chiefs have completed 59 seasons in professional American football and 49 with the National Football League (NFL). This article documents the season-by-season records of the Chiefs franchise from 1960 to the conclusion of their most recent season in 2018, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches.

The team began play as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL) in 1960 as the Dallas Texans. Following the 1962 AFL season, the team relocated to Kansas City, Missouri and was renamed the Kansas City Chiefs. The team has played in 900 total games in a total of 59 seasons, and a winning percentage of .521. The team’s three 13-win seasons in 1995, 1997, and 2003 remain their best regular season records to date and their 2–14 record in 2008 and 2012 is the Chiefs’ worst.

The Texans/Chiefs were the winningest team in the history of the AFL, compiling an 87–48 record from 1960 to 1969. The team won three league championships and served as the AFL’s representative in Super Bowls I and IV in 1966 and 1969. Since the franchise’s alignment to the NFL in 1970, the team has won eleven division championships including three straight and eight wild card playoff berths, seven of which were between 1990 and 1997 when the team never lost as many games as it won. Despite the franchise’s early success, the Chiefs did not win a post-season game between the 1993–94 and 2015–16 playoffs, whilst their victory on January 11, 1970 remains the franchise’s only Super Bowl title to date. It had been a long drought between AFC Championship games, with a large build up to the 2018-2019 game. Unfortunately, it ended in crushing defeat as the Patriots moved on to win yet another Super Bowl ring.

The Chiefs have suffered two main periods of failure. Between 1972 and 1985 the Kansas City Chiefs never appeared in the postseason and achieved only one winning season (in 1981) from 1974 until 1985. Between 2007 and 2012, the Chiefs also struggled, with two two-win and two four-win seasons. However, the recent Chiefs have done much better, with a 67–34 record (including postseason) from the 2013 to 2018 seasons. After a Week 10 win over the Arizona Cardinals in 2018, the Chiefs clinched six consecutive winning seasons and three consecutive division titles.

List of Los Angeles Chargers seasons

The Los Angeles Chargers are a professional American football franchise based in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The Chargers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) West division. The club was founded in 1959 by Barron Hilton and played the 1960 season in Los Angeles as part of the American Football League (AFL). In the next season, the Chargers moved to San Diego. In 2017, the Chargers relocated back to the Los Angeles area.

The franchise has experienced three major periods of success. The first was from 1960 to 1965, when the Chargers were AFL West champions five times and AFL champions once. The second was from 1978 to 1982, when the Chargers had winning seasons (seasons with more wins than losses) in each of these years, and won three consecutive division championships for the second time in franchise history. The most recent accomplishments range from 2004 to 2009, with the franchise reaching the playoffs five times in six years. Their only Super Bowl appearance was in 1994.

The Chargers have experienced three notable periods of decline. Between 1970 and 1977, the Chargers never won more games than they lost as part of a 13-year period without playing in the postseason, including four consecutive years last in their division from 1972 to 1975, in which year they bottomed out before two late wins avoided the NFL's first 0–14 season. From 1983 to 1991, they never placed higher than third in their division and did not make the playoffs. From 1996 to 2003, the team had no winning seasons, and had their worst season ever, winning only one of 16 games in 2000.The Chargers have been division champions nine times including 2009, all of them in the AFC West. They have been conference champions six times, but only once since the AFL-NFL merger in 1970. As of the end of the 2017 season, the Chargers had played 917 regular and post-season games in 58 seasons, and have appeared in the post-season seventeen times.

List of Oakland Raiders seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Oakland Raiders American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Raiders' franchise from 1960 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches.

List of Seattle Seahawks seasons

This article is a compilation of the list of seasons completed by the Seattle Seahawks American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Seahawks' franchise from 1976 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches. As of the end of the 2018 NFL season, the Seahawks have 23 winning seasons, 17 losing seasons, and 4 seasons where they finished 8–8. With a 35–6 Week 14 win over the Baltimore Ravens on December 13 during the 2015 season, not only did the Seahawks improved to 8–5 at that point in the season, but the Seahawks' all–time franchise regular season win–loss record improved to 313–312–0; this marked the first time ever in team history that the Seahawks have had an overall winning regular season win–loss record (a win–loss record above .500). The Seahawks are the one of four North American men's professional sports teams that have played in Seattle with an all–time winning record, after the Seattle Metropolitans (the first American team to win the Stanley Cup in 1917, folded in 1924), the Seattle SuperSonics (who relocated to Oklahoma City and became the Thunder in the summer of 2008), and the Seattle Sounders FC (established in 2007 as an expansion franchise, currently active). Therefore, the Seahawks are currently one of two active North American men's professional sports team located in Seattle with an overall winning record. On October 23, 2016, the Seahawks played the Arizona Cardinals at University of Phoenix Stadium and the game ended in a 6–6 tie after OT, which was the first time this ever happened in franchise history.

Los Angeles Chargers

The Los Angeles Chargers are a professional American football team based in the Greater Los Angeles Area. The Chargers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) West division. The team was founded on August 14, 1959, and began play on September 10, 1960, as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL), and spent its first season in Los Angeles, before moving to San Diego in 1961 to become the San Diego Chargers. The Chargers joined the NFL as result of the AFL–NFL merger in 1970, and played their home games at SDCCU Stadium. The return of the Chargers to Los Angeles was announced for the 2017 season, just one year after the Rams had moved back to the city from St. Louis. The Chargers will play their home games at Dignity Health Sports Park until the 2020 opening of the Los Angeles Stadium at Hollywood Park, which they will share with the Rams.

The Chargers won one AFL title in 1963 and reached the AFL playoffs five times and the AFL Championship four times before joining the NFL (1970) as part of the AFL–NFL merger. In the 43 years since then, the Chargers have made 13 trips to the playoffs and four appearances in the AFC Championship game. In 1994, the Chargers won their lone AFC championship and faced the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XXIX, losing 49–26. The Chargers have eight players and one coach enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio: wide receiver Lance Alworth (1962–1970), defensive end Fred Dean (1975–1981), quarterback Dan Fouts (1973–1987), head coach–general manager Sid Gillman (1960–1969, 1971), wide receiver Charlie Joiner (1976–1986), offensive lineman Ron Mix (1960–1969), tight end Kellen Winslow (1979–1987), linebacker Junior Seau (1990–2002), and running back LaDainian Tomlinson (2001–2009).

Mike Shanahan

Michael Edward Shanahan (born August 24, 1952) is an American football coach, who was the head coach for the Los Angeles Raiders, Denver Broncos, and Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL) for a total of 20 seasons. During his 14 seasons with the Broncos, he led the team to consecutive Super Bowl victories in XXXII and XXXIII, which were the franchise's first two NFL titles.

NFC West

The National Football Conference – Western Division or NFC West is one of the four divisions of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). It currently has four members: the Arizona Cardinals, the Los Angeles Rams, the San Francisco 49ers, and the Seattle Seahawks.

The division was formed in 1967 as the National Football League Coastal Division, keeping with the theme of having all of the league's divisions starting with the letter "C." The division was so named because its teams were fairly close to the coasts of the United States, although they were on opposite coasts, making for long travel between division rivals. The NFL Coastal Division had four members: Atlanta Falcons, Baltimore Colts, Los Angeles Rams, and San Francisco 49ers. Los Angeles and San Francisco occupied the West Coast, while Baltimore and Atlanta occupied the East Coast.

After the AFL–NFL merger in 1970, the division was renamed the NFC West. The Baltimore Colts moved to the AFC East and were replaced by the New Orleans Saints. In 1976, the newly formed Seattle Seahawks spent one season in this division before moving to the AFC West. Except for that one year, the division remained the same until 1995 with the addition of the new Carolina Panthers team. The Rams moved to St. Louis before that same season, making the division geographically inaccurate. Ten of the fifteen NFC teams were based west of Atlanta, and twelve of them were based west of Charlotte.

The 2002 re-alignment changed the entire look of the NFC West. The Falcons, Panthers, and Saints moved into the NFC South; while the Cardinals moved in from the NFC East and the Seahawks returned from the AFC West. The Rams remained in the West, preserving the historical rivalry with the 49ers that has existed since 1950, and thus had been the only team in the division that was located east of the Rocky Mountains until 2015. With the Rams' return to Los Angeles in 2016, the entire NFC West is now located west of the Rockies for the first time in its history.

In 2010, the NFC West became the first division in NFL history to have a champion with a losing record, after the 2010 Seattle Seahawks won the division title with a record of 7–9. They were joined in this distinction in 2014 by the Carolina Panthers, who won the NFC South with a record of 7–8–1.

Since the end of the 2016 NFL regular season, the 49ers lead the division with a record of 560–464–16 (107–132–1 since re-alignment) with five Super Bowl titles and an overall playoff record of 31–21. The Rams hold a record of 544–554–21 (87–152–1 since re-alignment) with three Super Bowl appearances and one win to go with a 19–24 overall playoffs record. The Cardinals hold a 111–128-1 record since joining the NFC West (542–732–40 overall) and a loss in Super Bowl XLIII, currently with a 7–9 playoff record, 5-4 as a member of the NFC West. The Seahawks hold a record of 137–102-1 since joining the NFC West (325–318-1 overall), with three Super Bowl appearances, winning Super Bowl XLVIII to go with a playoff record of 16–14; they are currently 13–9 in the playoffs as a member of the NFC West, having gone 3–5 while in the AFC West. Since re-alignment, the Seahawks have led the division in wins, division titles, and playoff appearances.

Tom Flores

Thomas Raymond Flores (born March 21, 1937) is a Mexican-American former professional football coach and player.

He and Mike Ditka are the only two people in National Football League history to win a Super Bowl as a player, assistant coach, and head coach (Super Bowl IV as a player for the Chiefs, Super Bowl XI as an assistant coach of the Raiders, and Super Bowl XV and Super Bowl XVIII as head coach of the Raiders). Flores was also the first Hispanic starting quarterback and the first minority head coach in professional football history to win a Super Bowl.Until his dismissal in 2018, Flores served as radio announcer for the Raiders Radio Network.

AFC
NFC
Franchise
Stadiums
Key personnel
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Retired numbers
Division championships (15)
Conference championships (8)
League championships (3)
Media
Current league affiliations
Former league affiliation
Seasons (58)
Franchise
Stadiums
Personnel
Culture
Rivalries
Playoff appearances (20)
Division championships (10)
League championships (3)
Retired numbers
Media
Current league affiliations
Former league affiliation
Seasons (58)
Franchise
Stadiums
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Wild card berths (3)
Division championships (15)
Conference championships (1)
League championships (1)
Current league affiliations
Former league affiliation
Seasons (59)
Franchise
Stadiums
Key personnel
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Media
Wild card berths (6)
Division championships (15)
Conference championships (4)
League championships (4)
Current league affiliations
Former league affiliation
Seasons (59)

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.