AFC East

The American Football Conference – Eastern Division or AFC East is one of the four divisions of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). There are currently four teams that reside in the division: the Buffalo Bills (based in Orchard Park, New York); the Miami Dolphins (based in Miami Gardens, Florida); the New England Patriots (based in Foxborough, Massachusetts); and the New York Jets (based in East Rutherford, New Jersey).

Since the division's enfranchisement in 1960, with the creation of the American Football League, the division has been represented in nineteen Super Bowls and won eight of them. The most recent appearance in the Super Bowl by an AFC East team was the Patriots victory in Super Bowl LIII.

At the end of 2018, the Patriots had the most wins in the division's history, with a record of 500-392-9, with a playoff record of 35-19 (6-5 in Super Bowls) entering the playoffs of that season.[1] The Dolphins were second at 446-350-4 (having played 84 fewer games than their division rivals) with a playoff record of 20-21 (2-3 in Super Bowls).[2] The Bills were at 406-470-8 with a playoff record of 14-15 (with two American Football League titles) and 0-4 in four consecutive Super Bowls.[3] The Jets held a record of 396-480-8, with a playoff record of 12-13 including a victory in Super Bowl III.[4]

In 2012, the Patriots broke a tie with the Dolphins for winning the most division titles; with subsequent division titles in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017 the Patriots have won 20 AFL/AFC East division titles to Miami's 14. The Bills have won ten division titles, and the Jets have won four.

Two teams formerly in the division combined for ten AFL/AFC East titles – the Houston Oilers (now the Tennessee Titans) won four division titles (and the 1960 and 1961 league titles) during the AFL era[5] while the BaltimoreIndianapolis Colts won six division titles (and Super Bowl V) in the 32 seasons they were in the division.[6]

AFC East
ConferenceAmerican Football Conference
LeagueNational Football League
SportAmerican football
Founded1960 (as the American Football League Eastern Division)
Teams
No. of teams4
Championships
Most recent AFC East champion(s)New England Patriots (2018)
Most AFC East titlesNew England Patriots (21 titles, have won 10 straight AFC East Titles)

AFL Eastern Division

The American Football League Eastern Division was formed during the inaugural season of the American Football League in 1960, as a counterpart to the AFL Western Division. The divisional alignment consisted of the Buffalo Bills, New England Patriots, New York Titans and Houston Oilers. The Miami Dolphins entered the AFL in 1966 as part of its Eastern division.[7]

AFC East Teams
Locale of the current 4 AFC East teams

The division was absorbed nearly intact with the AFL–NFL merger in 1970, but Houston was moved to the AFC Central (formerly the NFL Century Division, now the AFC North) and replaced by the closer Baltimore Colts (from the NFL Coastal Division, which became the NFC West). Despite relocating to Indianapolis, Indiana in 1984, the Colts continued to play in the AFC East until NFL expansion from 31 to 32 teams with the addition of the Houston Texans (successor club in Houston to the Oilers) and 2002 re-alignment when they were moved to the AFC South (the successor franchise to the Oilers, the Tennessee Titans, is also in the AFC South).[8]

Although Miami is farther south than the home cities of the other three teams, all of which are in the Northeast, all four AFC East teams have historical rivalries among them, dating from their years in the AFL during the 1960s.[9]

None of the AFC East teams currently play within the central city of their metropolitan area:

Almost analogously, three out of the four NFC East teams do not actually play within the city of their naming (only the Philadelphia Eagles do so).

All of the teams are or were coached by a first or second generation member of the Bill Parcells coaching tree: the Patriots have Bill Belichick; the Dolphins had Tony Sparano; the Jets had Eric Mangini (who served as an assistant with both Belichick and Parcells); and the Bills had Dick Jauron (fired on November 17, 2009), who served as an assistant with former Parcells assistant Tom Coughlin. The Jets were coached by Todd Bowles (2015-2018) and the Bills were coached by Rex Ryan for 31 games (the entire 2015-16 season, and he was fired before the last game of the 2016-17 season and replaced with interim Head Coach Anthony Lynn). Parcells himself coached the Patriots (1993–96) and the Jets (1997–99) and was Vice President of Football Operations for the Dolphins until the summer of 2010.[10]

ESPN's Chris Berman often calls this division the "AFC Adams" due to its geographical similarity to the old Adams Division of the NHL, now succeeded by the Atlantic Division.

Along with the AFC (formerly AFL) West, the AFC East is the oldest NFL division in terms of creation date (1960).

Division lineups

Place cursor over year for division champ or Super Bowl team.

AFL Eastern Division
1900s
60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69
Buffalo Bills
Boston Patriots
New York Titans New York Jets [C]
Houston Oilers [B]
  Miami Dolphins [D]
AFC East Division
1900s 2000s
70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01
Buffalo Bills
Boston Patriots New England Patriots [A]
New York Jets
Baltimore Colts [E] Indianapolis Colts [F]
Miami Dolphins
AFC East Division
2000s
02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
New England Patriots
Buffalo Bills
New York Jets
Miami Dolphins
     Team not in division      Division Won AFL Championship      Division Won AFC Championship      Division Won Super Bowl
A Boston Patriots renamed to New England Patriots.
B Houston Oilers move to newly created AFC Central division (1970 season) and later are renamed the Tennessee Oilers (1997 season), then Tennessee Titans (1999 season). Moved to AFC South in 2002.
C New York Titans renamed to New York Jets (1963 season)
D Miami Dolphins enfranchised (1966 season)
E Baltimore Colts merge from NFL's Coastal Division (1970 season)
F Baltimore Colts relocate to Indianapolis subsequently renamed Indianapolis Colts (1984 season). Moved to AFC South in 2002.

Division champions

Season Team Record Playoff Results
1960 Houston Oilers 10–4 Won AFL Championship (Chargers) 24–16
1961 Houston Oilers 10–3–1 Won AFL Championship (at Chargers) 10–3
1962 Houston Oilers 11–3 Lost AFL Championship (Texans) 17–20 (2OT)
1963 Boston Patriots 7–6–1 Won Divisional playoffs (at Bills) 26–8
Lost AFL Championship (at Chargers) 10–51
1964 Buffalo Bills 12–2 Won AFL Championship (Chargers) 20–7
1965 Buffalo Bills 10–3–1 Won AFL Championship (at Chargers) 23–0
1966 Buffalo Bills 9–4–1 Lost AFL Championship (Chiefs) 7–31
1967 Houston Oilers 9–4–1 Lost AFL Championship (at Raiders) 7–40
1968 New York Jets 11–3 Won AFL Championship (Raiders) 27–23
Won Super Bowl III (vs. Colts) 16–7
1969 New York Jets 10–4 Lost Divisional playoffs (Chiefs) 6–13
1970 Baltimore Colts 11–2–1 Won Divisional Playoffs (Bengals) 17–0
Won AFC Championship (Raiders) 27–17
Won Super Bowl V (vs. Cowboys) 16–13
1971 Miami Dolphins 10–3–1 Won Divisional Playoffs (at Chiefs) 27–24 (2OT)
Won AFC Championship (Colts) 21–0
Lost Super Bowl VI (vs. Cowboys) 3–24
1972 Miami Dolphins 14–0 Won Divisional Playoffs (Browns) 20–14
Won AFC Championship (at Steelers) 21–17
Won Super Bowl VII (vs. Redskins) 14–7
1973 Miami Dolphins 12–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Bengals) 34–16
Won AFC Championship (Raiders) 27–10
Won Super Bowl VIII (vs. Vikings) 24–7
1974 Miami Dolphins 11–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Raiders) 26–28
1975 Baltimore Colts 10–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Steelers) 10–28
1976 Baltimore Colts 11–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Steelers) 14–40
1977 Baltimore Colts 10–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Raiders) 31–37 (2OT)
1978 New England Patriots 11–5 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Oilers) 14–31
1979 Miami Dolphins 10–6 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Steelers) 14–34
1980 Buffalo Bills 11–5 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Chargers) 14–20
1981 Miami Dolphins 11–4–1 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Chargers) 38–41 (OT)
1982+ Miami Dolphins 7–2 Won First Round Playoffs (Patriots) 28–13
Won Second Round Playoffs (Chargers) 34–13
Won AFC Championship (Jets) 14–0
Lost Super Bowl XVII (vs. Redskins) 17–27
1983 Miami Dolphins 12–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Seahawks) 20–27
1984 Miami Dolphins 14–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Seahawks) 31–10
Won AFC Championship (Steelers) 45–28
Lost Super Bowl XIX (vs. 49ers) 16–38
1985 Miami Dolphins 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Browns) 24–21
Lost AFC Championship (Patriots) 14–31
1986 New England Patriots 11–5 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Broncos) 22–17
1987 Indianapolis Colts 9–6 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Browns) 21–38
1988 Buffalo Bills 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Oilers) 17–10
Lost AFC Championship (at Bengals) 10–21
1989 Buffalo Bills 9–7 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Browns) 30–34
1990 Buffalo Bills 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Dolphins) 44–34
Won AFC Championship (Raiders) 51–3
Lost Super Bowl XXV (vs. Giants) 19–20
1991 Buffalo Bills 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Chiefs) 37–14
Won AFC Championship (Broncos) 10–7
Lost Super Bowl XXVI (vs. Redskins) 24–37
1992 Miami Dolphins 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Chargers) 31–0
Lost AFC Championship (Bills) 10–29
1993 Buffalo Bills 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Raiders) 29–23
Won AFC Championship (Chiefs) 30–13
Lost Super Bowl XXVIII (vs. Cowboys) 13–30
1994 Miami Dolphins 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Chiefs) 27–17
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Chargers) 21–22
1995 Buffalo Bills 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Dolphins) 37–22
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Steelers) 21–40
1996 New England Patriots 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Steelers) 28–3
Won AFC Championship (Jaguars) 20–6
Lost Super Bowl XXXI (vs. Packers) 21–35
1997 New England Patriots 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Dolphins) 17–3
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Steelers) 6–7
1998 New York Jets 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Jaguars) 34–24
Lost AFC Championship (at Broncos) 10–23
1999 Indianapolis Colts 13–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Titans) 16–19
2000 Miami Dolphins 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Colts) 23–17 (OT)
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Raiders) 0–27
2001 New England Patriots 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Raiders) 16–13 (OT)
Won AFC Championship (at Steelers) 24–17
Won Super Bowl XXXVI (vs. Rams) 20–17
2002 New York Jets 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Colts) 41–0
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Raiders) 10–30
2003 New England Patriots 14–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Titans) 17–14
Won AFC Championship (Colts) 24–14
Won Super Bowl XXXVIII (vs. Panthers) 32–29
2004 New England Patriots 14–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Colts) 20–3
Won AFC Championship (at Steelers) 41–27
Won Super Bowl XXXIX (vs. Eagles) 24–21
2005 New England Patriots 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Jaguars) 28–3
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Broncos) 13–27
2006 New England Patriots 12–4 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Jets) 37–16
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Chargers) 24–21
Lost AFC Championship (at Colts) 34–38
2007 New England Patriots 16–0 Won Divisional Playoffs (Jaguars) 31–20
Won AFC Championship (Chargers) 21–12
Lost Super Bowl XLII (vs. Giants) 14–17
2008 Miami Dolphins 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Ravens) 9–27
2009 New England Patriots 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Ravens) 14–33
2010 New England Patriots 14–2 Lost Divisional Playoffs (Jets) 21–28
2011 New England Patriots 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Broncos) 45–10
Won AFC Championship (Ravens) 23–20
Lost Super Bowl XLVI (vs. Giants) 17–21
2012 New England Patriots 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Texans) 41–28
Lost AFC Championship (Ravens) 13–28
2013 New England Patriots 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Colts) 43–22
Lost AFC Championship (at Broncos) 16–26
2014 New England Patriots 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Ravens) 35–31
Won AFC Championship (Colts) 45–7
Won Super Bowl XLIX (vs. Seahawks) 28–24
2015 New England Patriots 12–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (Chiefs) 27–20
Lost AFC Championship (at Broncos) 18–20
2016 New England Patriots 14–2 Won Divisional Playoffs (Texans) 34–16
Won AFC Championship (Steelers) 36–17
Won Super Bowl LI (vs. Falcons) 34–28 (OT)
2017 New England Patriots 13–3 Won Divisional Playoffs (Titans) 35–14
Won AFC Championship (Jaguars) 24–20
Lost Super Bowl LII (vs. Eagles) 33–41
2018 New England Patriots 11–5 Won Divisional Playoffs (Chargers) 41–28
Won AFC Championship (at Chiefs) 37–31 (OT)
Won Super Bowl LIII (vs. Rams) 13–3
  • + – A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games. Thus, the league used a special 16-team playoff tournament just for this year. Division standings were ignored, Miami had the best record of the division teams.

Wild Card qualifiers

Season Team Record Playoff Results
1969 Houston Oilers 6–6–2 Lost Divisional playoffs (at Raiders) 7–56
1970 Miami Dolphins 10–4 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Raiders) 14–21
1971 Baltimore Colts 10–4 Won Divisional Playoffs (at Browns) 20–3
Lost AFC Championship (at Dolphins) 0–21
1974 Buffalo Bills 9–5 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Steelers) 14–32
1976 New England Patriots 11–3 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Raiders) 21–24
1978 Miami Dolphins 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Oilers) 9–17
1981 New York Jets 10–5–1 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Bills) 27–31
Buffalo Bills 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Jets) 31–27
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Bengals) 21–28
1982+ New York Jets 6–3 Won First Round Playoffs (at Bengals) 44–17
Won Second Round Playoffs (at Raiders) 17–14
Lost AFC Championship (at Dolphins) 0–14
New England Patriots 5–4 Lost First Round Playoffs (at Dolphins) 13–28
1985 New York Jets 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Patriots) 14–26
New England Patriots 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Jets) 26–14
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Raiders) 27–20
Won AFC Championship (at Dolphins) 31–14
Lost Super Bowl XX (vs. Bears) 10–46
1986 New York Jets 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Chiefs) 35–15
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Browns) 20–23 (2OT)
1990 Miami Dolphins 12–4 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Chiefs) 17–16
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Bills) 34–44
1991 New York Jets 8–8 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Oilers) 10–17
1992 Buffalo Bills 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Oilers) 41–38 (OT)
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Steelers) 24–3
Won AFC Championship (at Dolphins) 29–10
Lost Super Bowl XXVII (vs. Cowboys) 17–52
1994 New England Patriots 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Browns) 13–20
1995 Indianapolis Colts 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Chargers) 35–20
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Chiefs) 10–7
Lost AFC Championship (at Steelers) 16–20
Miami Dolphins 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Bills) 22–37
1996 Buffalo Bills 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Jaguars) 27–30
Indianapolis Colts 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Steelers) 14–42
1997 Miami Dolphins 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Patriots) 3–17
1998 Miami Dolphins 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Bills) 24–17
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Broncos) 3–38
Buffalo Bills 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Dolphins) 17–24
New England Patriots 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Jaguars) 10–25
1999 Buffalo Bills 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Titans) 16–22
Miami Dolphins 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Seahawks) 20–17
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Jaguars) 7–62
2000 Indianapolis Colts 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Dolphins) 17–23 (OT)
2001 Miami Dolphins 11–5 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Ravens) 3–20
New York Jets 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Raiders) 24–38
2004 New York Jets 10–6 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Chargers) 20–17 (OT)
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Steelers) 17–20 (OT)
2006 New York Jets 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Patriots) 16–37
2009 New York Jets 9–7 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Bengals) 24–14
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Chargers) 17–14
Lost AFC Championship (at Colts) 17–30
2010 New York Jets 11–5 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Colts) 17–16
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Patriots) 28–21
Lost AFC Championship (at Steelers) 19–24
2016 Miami Dolphins 10–6 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Steelers) 12–30
2017 Buffalo Bills 9–7 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Jaguars) 3–10
  • + – A players' strike in 1982 reduced the regular season to nine games. Thus, the league used a special 16-team playoff tournament just for this year. Division standings were ignored, Miami had the best record of the division teams.

Total playoff berths while in the AFL/AFC East

(AFC East records 1960–2016 seasons)
Reflects Colts & Oilers results only while in the East Division.
In the sortable table below, teams can be ordered by name, number of division wins, playoff berths, or titles.

Team Division
Titles
Playoff
Berths
AFL
Titles
AFC
Championships
Super Bowl
Championships
New England Patriots 20 25 0 11 6
Miami Dolphins 14 23 0 5 2
Buffalo Bills 10 18 2 4 0
New York Jets 4 14 1 0 1
Indianapolis Colts1* 6 10 0 0 0
Houston Oilers2* 4 5 2 0 0
AFC East -Division--
Titles
-Playoff-
Berths
AFL
-Titles-
AFC
-Championships-
Super Bowl
-Championships-
Totals- 1960–2016 57 96 5 20 9

1 Realigned from NFL Coastal in 1970 merger. Known as the Baltimore Colts before 1984. Realigned into the AFC South beginning with the 2002 NFL season.
2 Realigned into the AFC Central in 1970 merger, and into the AFC South in 2002. Known as Tennessee Oilers from 1997–98, and Tennessee Titans since 1999.

Season results

(#) Denotes team that won the Super Bowl
(#) Denotes team that won the AFC Championship
(#) Denotes team that won the AFL Championship
(#) Denotes team that qualified for the NFL Playoffs or AFL Playoffs
Season Team (record)
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
AFL Eastern
1960 Houston (10–4) N.Y. Titans (7–7) Buffalo (5–8–1) Boston (5–9)
1961 Houston (10–3–1) Boston (9–4–1) N.Y. Titans (7–7) Buffalo (6–8)
1962 Houston (11–3) Boston (9–4–1) Buffalo (7–6–1) N.Y. Titans (5–9)
1963 Boston (7–6–1) Buffalo (7–6–1) Houston (6–8) N.Y. Jets (5–8–1)
1964 Buffalo (12–2) Boston (10–3–1) N.Y. Jets (5–8–1) Houston (4–10)
1965 Buffalo (10–3–1) N.Y. Jets (5–8–1) Boston (4–8–2) Houston (4–10)
1966 Buffalo (9–4–1) Boston (8–4–2) N.Y. Jets (6–6–2) Houston (3–11) Miami (3–11)
1967 Houston (9–4–1) N.Y. Jets (8–5–1) Buffalo (4–10) Miami (4–10) Boston (3–10–1)
1968 N.Y. Jets (11–3) Houston (7–7) Miami (5–8–1) Boston (4–10) Buffalo (1–12–1)
1969 N.Y. Jets (10–4) Houston (6–6–2) Boston (4–10) Buffalo (4–10) Miami (3–10–1)
AFC East
1970 Baltimore (11–2–1) Miami (10–4) N.Y. Jets (4–10) Buffalo (3–10–1) Boston (2–12)
1971 Miami (10–3–1) Baltimore (10–4) New England (6–8) N.Y. Jets (6–8) Buffalo (1–13)
1972 Miami (14–0) N.Y. Jets (7–7) Baltimore (5–9) Buffalo (4–9–1) New England (3–11)
1973 Miami (12–2) Buffalo (9–5) New England (5–9) N.Y. Jets (4–10) Baltimore (4–10)
1974 Miami (11–3) Buffalo (9–5) New England (7–7) N.Y. Jets (7–7) Baltimore (2–12)
1975 (3) Baltimore (10–4) Miami (10–4) Buffalo (8–6) N.Y. Jets (3–11) New England (3–11)
1976 (2) Baltimore (11–3) (4) New England (11–3) Miami (6–8) N.Y. Jets (3–11) Buffalo (2–12)
1977 (2) Baltimore (10–4) Miami (10–4) New England (9–5) Buffalo (3–11) N.Y. Jets (3–11)
1978 (2) New England (11–5) (4) Miami (11–5) N.Y. Jets (8–8) Buffalo (5–11) Baltimore (5–11)
1979 (3) Miami (10–6) New England (9–7) N.Y. Jets (8–8) Buffalo (7–9) Baltimore (5–11)
1980 (3) Buffalo (11–5) New England (10–6) Miami (8–8) Baltimore (7–9) N.Y. Jets (4–12)
1981 (2) Miami (11–4–1) (4) N.Y. Jets (10–5–1) (5) Buffalo (10–6) Baltimore (2–14) New England (2–14)
1982^ (2) Miami (7–2) (6) N.Y. Jets (6–3) (7) New England (5–4) Buffalo (4–5) Baltimore (0–8–1)
1983 (2) Miami (12–4) New England (8–8) Buffalo (8–8) Baltimore (7–9) N.Y. Jets (7–9)
1984 (1) Miami (14–2) New England (9–7) N.Y. Jets (7–9) Indianapolis (4–12) Buffalo (2–14)
1985 (2) Miami (12–4) (4) N.Y. Jets (11–5) (5) New England (11–5) Indianapolis (5–11) Buffalo (2–14)
1986 (3) New England (11–5) (4) N.Y. Jets (10–6) Miami (8–8) Buffalo (4–12) Indianapolis (3–13)
1987 (3) Indianapolis (9–6) New England (8–7) Miami (8–7) Buffalo (7–8) N.Y. Jets (6–9)
1988 (2) Buffalo (12–4) Indianapolis (9–7) New England (9–7) N.Y. Jets (8–7–1) Miami (6–10)
1989 (3) Buffalo (9–7) Indianapolis (8–8) Miami (8–8) New England (5–11) N.Y. Jets (4–12)
1990 (1) Buffalo (13–3) (4) Miami (12–4) Indianapolis (7–9) N.Y. Jets (6–10) New England (1–15)
1991 (1) Buffalo (13–3) (6) N.Y. Jets (8–8) Miami (8–8) New England (6–10) Indianapolis (1–15)
1992 (2) Miami (11–5) (4) Buffalo (11–5) Indianapolis (9–7) N.Y. Jets (4–12) New England (2–14)
1993 (1) Buffalo (12–4) Miami (9–7) N.Y. Jets (8–8) New England (5–11) Indianapolis (4–12)
1994 (3) Miami (10–6) (5) New England (10–6) Indianapolis (8–8) Buffalo (7–9) N.Y. Jets (6–10)
1995 (3) Buffalo (10–6) (5) Indianapolis (9–7) (6) Miami (9–7) New England (6–10) N.Y. Jets (3–13)
1996 (2) New England (11–5) (4) Buffalo (10–6) (6) Indianapolis (9–7) Miami (8–8) N.Y. Jets (1–15)
1997 (3) New England (10–6) (6) Miami (9–7) N.Y. Jets (9–7) Buffalo (6–10) Indianapolis (3–13)
1998 (2) N.Y. Jets (12–4) (4) Miami (10–6) (5) Buffalo (10–6) (6) New England (9–7) Indianapolis (3–13)
1999 (2) Indianapolis (13–3) (5) Buffalo (11–5) (6) Miami (9–7) N.Y. Jets (8–8) New England (8–8)
2000 (3) Miami (11–5) (6) Indianapolis (10–6) N.Y. Jets (9–7) Buffalo (8–8) New England (5–11)
2001 (2) New England (11–5) (4) Miami (11–5) (6) N.Y. Jets (10–6) Indianapolis (6–10) Buffalo (3–13)
2002 (4) N.Y. Jets (9–7) New England (9–7) Miami (9–7) Buffalo (8–8)
2003 (1) New England (14–2) Miami (10–6) Buffalo (6–10) N.Y. Jets (6–10)
2004 (2) New England (14–2) (5) N.Y. Jets (10–6) Buffalo (9–7) Miami (4–12)
2005 (4) New England (10–6) Miami (9–7) Buffalo (5–11) N.Y. Jets (4–12)
2006 (4) New England (12–4) (5) N.Y. Jets (10–6) Buffalo (7–9) Miami (6–10)
2007 (1) New England (16–0) Buffalo (7–9) N.Y. Jets (4–12) Miami (1–15)
2008 (3) Miami (11–5) New England (11–5) N.Y. Jets (9–7) Buffalo (7–9)
2009 (3) New England (10–6) (5) N.Y. Jets (9–7) Miami (7–9) Buffalo (6–10)
2010 (1) New England (14–2) (6) N.Y. Jets (11–5) Miami (7–9) Buffalo (4–12)
2011 (1) New England (13–3) N.Y. Jets (8–8) Miami (6–10) Buffalo (6–10)
2012 (2) New England (12–4) Miami (7–9) N.Y. Jets (6–10) Buffalo (6–10)
2013 (2) New England (12–4) N.Y. Jets (8–8) Miami (8–8) Buffalo (6–10)
2014 (1) New England (12–4) Buffalo (9–7) Miami (8–8) N.Y. Jets (4–12)
2015 (2) New England (12–4) N.Y. Jets (10–6) Buffalo (8–8) Miami (6–10)
2016 (1) New England (14–2) (6) Miami (10–6) Buffalo (7–9) N.Y. Jets (5–11)
2017 (1) New England (13–3) (6) Buffalo (9–7) Miami (6–10) N.Y. Jets (5–11)
2018 (2) New England (11–5) Miami (7–9) Buffalo (6–10) N.Y. Jets (4–12)

See also

References

  1. ^ "Boston/New England Patriots Team Encyclopedia - Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  2. ^ "Miami Dolphins Team Encyclopedia - Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  3. ^ "Buffalo Bills Team Encyclopedia - Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  4. ^ "New York Jets Team Encyclopedia - Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  5. ^ "Houston Oilers/Tennessee Oilers/Tennessee Titans Team Encyclopedia - Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  6. ^ "Baltimore/Indianapolis Colts Team Encyclopedia - Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  7. ^ Urena, Ivan (December 11, 2013). "Pro Football Schedules: A Complete Historical Guide from 1933 to the Present". McFarland – via Google Books.
  8. ^ "NFL and AFL announce merger - Jun 08, 1966 - HISTORY.com".
  9. ^ "Clayton: AFC South could be worst division ever".
  10. ^ "Bill Parcells thinks Miami Dolphins could make a run at the AFC East title".
1971 Miami Dolphins season

The 1971 Miami Dolphins season was the team's sixth, and second in the National Football League (NFL). The team improved on their 10-4 record from 1970 and finished 10–3–1. The Dolphins opened the season tying the Denver Broncos, the first season opener in NFL history to end in a tie, the Steelers vs Browns game in 2018 became the second season opener that ended up in a tie, before splitting their next 2 games to sit at 1–1–1. The Dolphins then won 8 in a row to sit at 9–1–1. The Dolphins won their first division title, finishing first in the AFC East, and then defeated the Kansas City Chiefs in the Divisional Round in 2 overtimes, the game is considered the longest in NFL history by time, and then advanced to their first ever AFC championship game, where they defeated the reigning champion Colts, 21–0, and went on to play in Super Bowl VI, their first Super Bowl berth. However, in the Super Bowl, Miami was walloped 24–3 by Dallas.

1975 Baltimore Colts season

The 1975 Baltimore Colts season was the 23rd season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League's 1975 season with a record of 10 wins and 4 losses, and finished tied for first in the AFC East division with the Miami Dolphins. However, the Colts won the division tiebreaker with Miami based on a head-to-head sweep (2–0). The Colts started the season losing four of their first five games, before sweeping their final nine games and narrowly beating out Miami for the division title.

The 1975 Colts coaching staff included 23-year-old assistant Bill Belichick, his first association with an NFL team and first coaching position. Belichick would go on to win two Super Bowls as defensive coordinator with the New York Giants in 1986 and 1990, and five more as head coach of the New England Patriots in 2001, 2003, 2004, 2014, and 2016.

1976 Baltimore Colts season

The 1976 Baltimore Colts season was the 24th season for the team in the National Football League. The Baltimore Colts finished the National Football League’s 1976 season with a record of 11 wins and 3 losses, and finished tied for first in the AFC East division with the New England Patriots. However, the Colts finished ahead of New England in the AFC East based on a better division record (7–1 to Patriots' 6–2).

The season started with much turmoil when head coach Ted Marchibroda resigned shortly before the season opener due to a power struggle with general manager Joe Thomas. Several Colts assistant coaches threatened to leave the team, and quarterback Bert Jones publicly came to his coach’s defense. Thomas and Colts owner Robert Irsay quickly made amends with the coach before the season started. (Thomas would be fired by the team shortly after the season.)

The Colts offense was dominant in 1976: they led the league in scoring with 417 points (29.7 per game). Quarterback Bert Jones was named league MVP after passing for a league-best 3,104 yards, 9.27 yards-per-attempt, and a passer rating of 102.5, second best in the NFL. Running back Lydell Mitchell also had a spectactular year, rushing for 1,200 yards, and catching 60 passes. Wide receiver Roger Carr proved to be a valuable deep threat in the passing game, leading the league 1,112 receiving yards and 25.9 yards per reception. All three offensive players made the 1976 AFC Pro Bowl team.

1986 New England Patriots season

The 1986 New England Patriots season was the franchise's 17th season in the National Football League and 27th overall. The Patriots matched their 11-5 record from the previous season, but this time they finished first in the AFC East, thus winning the division title. This would be the last AFC East Division title the Patriots would win until 1996.

1987 Indianapolis Colts season

The 1987 Indianapolis Colts season was the 35th season for the team in the National Football League (NFL) and fourth in Indianapolis. The team finished the strike-shortened season with a record of 9 wins and 6 losses, and won the AFC East division.

This season marked the first winning season, division championship, and the first trip to the playoffs for the Colts in Indianapolis. It was the franchise's first playoff appearance in ten seasons.

1992 Miami Dolphins season

The 1992 Miami Dolphins season was the franchise's 27th season in the National Football League.

The season began with the team attempting to improve on their 8–8 record in 1991.

The season was a success as the Dolphins finished the season 11–5, won the AFC East and returned to the playoffs after a one-year absence. After beating the Chargers 31-0 in the Divisional Playoffs, they played host to their AFC East rivals the Buffalo Bills in the AFC Championship Game. However, 5 turnovers and a huge disparity in the running game meant they lost the game 29-10.

As of 2018, this was the closest the Dolphins have gotten to returning to the Super Bowl.

2002 New York Jets season

The 2002 New York Jets season was the 43rd season for the team, and the 33rd in the National Football League. The team tried to improve upon its 10–6 record from 2001. The Jets overcame a 2–5 start to finish 9–7 and won their second AFC East division title.

After a heartbreaking 24–21 week 8 loss to the Cleveland Browns at the Meadowlands, head coach Herman Edwards gave his famous “You play to win the game” tirade in the post-game press conference. The mid-season debut of quarterback Chad Pennington helped lead the Jets to a 7–2 record down the stretch. After posting a stunning rout of the Indianapolis Colts by a score of 41–0 at the Meadowlands in the Wild Card round of the playoffs, they lost for the second year in a row to the Oakland Raiders, 30–10 in the Divisional round.

Bill Belichick

William Stephen Belichick ( or (; born April 16, 1952) is an American football coach who serves as the head coach of the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). His extensive authority over the Patriots' football operations effectively makes him the general manager of the team as well. He holds numerous coaching records, including winning a record six Super Bowls as a head coach of the New England Patriots, and two more as defensive coordinator for the New York Giants. He is widely considered to be one of the greatest coaches in NFL history by current and former players, his peers, and the press.Belichick began his coaching career in 1975 and became the defensive coordinator for New York Giants head coach Bill Parcells by 1985. Parcells and Belichick won two Super Bowls together before Belichick left to become the head coach of the Cleveland Browns in 1991. He remained in Cleveland for five seasons but was fired following the team's 1995 season. He then rejoined Parcells, first in New England, where the team lost Super Bowl XXXI, and later with the New York Jets.

After being named head coach of the Jets, Belichick resigned after only one day on the job to accept the head coaching job for the New England Patriots on January 27, 2000. Since then, he has led the Patriots to 16 AFC East division titles, 13 appearances in the AFC Championship Game, and nine Super Bowl appearances, with a record six wins. Belichick has won eight Super Bowl titles in total from his combined time as an assistant and head coach.

Belichick is the NFL's longest-tenured active head coach, as well as the first all-time in playoff coaching wins with 31 and third in regular season coaching wins in the NFL with 261. He is one of only three head coaches who have won six NFL titles. He was named the AP NFL Coach of the Year for the 2003, 2007, and 2010 seasons.

Don Shula

Donald Francis Shula (born January 4, 1930) is a former professional American football coach and player who is best known as the head coach of the Miami Dolphins, the team he led to two Super Bowl victories, and to the only perfect season in the history of the National Football League (NFL). He was previously the head coach of the Baltimore Colts, with whom he won the 1968 NFL Championship. Shula was drafted out of John Carroll University in the 1951 NFL Draft, and he played professionally as a defensive back for the Cleveland Browns, Baltimore Colts, and Washington Redskins.

Shula was named 1993 Sportsman of the Year by Sports Illustrated. He had only two losing seasons in his 33-year career as a head coach in the NFL. He led his teams to six Super Bowls. In his first Super Bowl, the Colts set the record for the longest period to be shut out, not scoring until 3:19 remained in the game, which was later broken in Super Bowl VII. At his next Super Bowl, the Dolphins set the Super Bowl record for the lowest points scored by any team, with one field goal. The following year, he coached a perfect season and broke the record of longest shutout, this time with his team on the winning side, not giving up any points until 2:07 remained. The Dolphins repeated as Super Bowl champions the following season, as they defeated the Minnesota Vikings 24–7. He currently holds the NFL record for most career wins as a head coach, with 347. Shula was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1997.

History of the Baltimore Colts

The Indianapolis Colts professional American football franchise was originally based in Baltimore, Maryland, as the Baltimore Colts from 1953 to 1984. The team was named for Baltimore's history of horse breeding and racing. It was the second incarnation of the Baltimore Colts, the first having played for three years in the All-America Football Conference and one in the National Football League (NFL). The 1953–83 Baltimore Colts team played its home games at Memorial Stadium.

List of Buffalo Bills seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Buffalo Bills American football franchise. The list documents the season-by-season records of the Bills' franchise from 1960 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches. The Bills finished their most recent season (2018) with a record of six wins and ten losses.

For complete team history, see History of the Buffalo Bills.

List of Indianapolis Colts seasons

The Indianapolis Colts, formerly the Baltimore Colts, are an American football team playing in the National Football League (NFL). This list documents the season-by-season records of the Colts franchise from 1953 to present, including postseason records and league awards for individual players or head coaches. In 1953, a Baltimore-based group led by Carroll Rosenbloom gained the rights to a new Baltimore franchise. Rosenbloom was granted an NFL team, and was awarded the holdings of the defunct Dallas Texans organization. The new team was named the Colts after the previous team that folded after the 1950 NFL season. After 31 seasons in Baltimore, Colts owner Robert Irsay moved the team to Indianapolis, Indiana.The Colts have won two Super Bowl championships (Super Bowl V and Super Bowl XLI). They also played in and lost Super Bowl III and Super Bowl XLIV. Before the AFL and NFL merged in 1970, they won three NFL Championships (1958, 1959, and 1968). By winning Super Bowl XLI the Colts became the first team that played its home games in a domed stadium to win a Super Bowl held in an outdoor stadium.After the Colts owner Jim Irsay hired Tony Dungy in 2002, the Colts made the playoffs for nine straight seasons. They won five straight AFC South titles from 2003 to 2007 and had seven consecutive seasons of 12 or more victories from 2003 to 2009, the first time that has been achieved in the NFL's 90-year history. Much of the team's success throughout the 2000s was attributed to the trio of general manager Bill Polian, coach Dungy, and quarterback Peyton Manning.In the 2013 season, the Colts secured their first division championship since Manning's departure and first under quarterback Andrew Luck and head coach Chuck Pagano.

List of Miami Dolphins seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the Miami Dolphins American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Dolphins franchise from 1966 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches.

Although the Miami Dolphins were not successful before joining the NFL, from 1970 when they played their first season after the AFL–NFL merger until 2001 they were one of the most successful teams in the league, playing in the postseason on 22 occasions over those 32 years and winning 335 and tying two of 528 games for an overall win percentage of 63.6. Early in this period the Dolphins won their only two Super Bowls in consecutive seasons, in the process achieving the only modern-day perfect season in any major professional sports league during only their third year in the NFL. Much of this success was orchestrated by coach Don Shula who joined the team in 1970 and stayed with them until his retirement in 1995.

After Shula retired in 1995, the Dolphins remained a force for six years under successors Jimmy Johnson and Dave Wannstedt, but since 2002 and especially since 2004 have fallen on harder times, reaching the postseason only twice in the twelve seasons since. In 2007, if not for their overtime victory over the Baltimore Ravens, would've suffered an imperfect season, a year before the Detroit Lions became the first team to go winless since the NFL expanded to a 16-game schedule. That same season, the Dolphins became the first team in NFL history to win their division following a 1-15 season, and as of 2018, marked the last non-Patriot division title in the AFC East.

For complete team history, see History of the Miami Dolphins.

List of New England Patriots seasons

The New England Patriots are an American football team based in Foxborough, Massachusetts. They compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) East division. Originally called the Boston Patriots, the team was founded as one of eight charter members of the American Football League (AFL) in 1960 under the ownership of Billy Sullivan. The team became part of the NFL when the two leagues merged in 1970. The following year, they moved from Boston to nearby Foxborough, and changed their name to the New England Patriots.The modern NFL championship game, the Super Bowl, was founded in the 1966 season; the first four were contested between the champions of the AFL and the NFL. After the merger, the Super Bowl became the united league's championship. The Patriots made the 1963 AFL Championship Game, but struggled severely in the early years of the united league, not making the postseason until 1976. After a few good seasons including a Super Bowl appearance against a champion Bears outfit, the Patriots reached a nadir between 1989 and 1993 when they won only 19 of 80 games.

Since Bill Belichick was hired as the team's head coach in 2000, the Patriots have finished first or second in the AFC East every year except Belichick's first season, with both second-place finishes caused by tiebreakers. Over that time, they have won six Super Bowls, nine AFC Championship Games, and sixteen AFC East titles, while amassing a regular season record of 201–71. The team's quarterback over that same period, Tom Brady, has been awarded the NFL Most Valuable Player (MVP) three times, and the Super Bowl Most Valuable Player four times; he is one of only five players named Super Bowl MVP more than once, and the only one named 4 times.The Patriots have won six Super Bowl championships (XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXXIX, XLIX, LI, and LIII). They also played in and lost Super Bowls XX, XXXI, XLII, XLVI, and LII. During the 2007 regular season, the Patriots became the only NFL team in history to win 16 games, and the first since the 1972 Miami Dolphins (in a 14-game season) to complete the regular campaign undefeated. Belichick's Patriots are one of only two teams to win three Super Bowls in four years (the other being the Dallas Cowboys from 1993 to 1996).Overall, the Patriots have made 24 playoff appearances, one of which was before the merger. Since the merger, they have played fourteen AFC Championship Games, winning eleven of them to advance to the Super Bowl. In the Patriots' 56-year history, they have an overall regular season record of 476 wins, 383 losses, and 9 ties, plus an overall postseason record of 33 wins and 19 losses. In the 2018 NFL season, the Patriots reached their 11th Super Bowl, breaking their own record for most Super Bowl appearances by any organization of all time.

List of New York Jets seasons

This is a list of seasons completed by the New York Jets, formerly the New York Titans, an American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Jets' franchise from 1960 to the present, including postseason records and league awards for individual players or head coaches. The Titans were a part of the inaugural season of the American Football League (AFL) in 1960. In 1963, the Titans changed their name to the Jets after a change in ownership.

The New York Jets have won one National Football League championship in Super Bowl III. In their 53-year history, they have an overall regular season record of 373 wins, 439 losses, and 8 ties. They have made 14 postseason appearances, and have an overall postseason record of 12 wins and 13 losses.

For complete team history, see History of the New York Jets.

Miami Dolphins

The Miami Dolphins are a professional American football team based in the Miami metropolitan area. The Dolphins compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) East division. The Dolphins play their home games at Hard Rock Stadium in the northern suburb of Miami Gardens, Florida, and are headquartered in Davie, Florida. The Dolphins are Florida's oldest professional sports team. Of the four AFC East teams, they are the only team in the division that was not a charter member of the American Football League (AFL).

The Dolphins were founded by attorney-politician Joe Robbie and actor-comedian Danny Thomas. They began play in the AFL in 1966. The region had not had a professional football team since the days of the Miami Seahawks, who played in the All-America Football Conference in 1946, before becoming the first incarnation of the Baltimore Colts. For the first few years, the Dolphins' full-time training camp and practice facilities were at Saint Andrew's School, a private boys boarding prep school in Boca Raton. In the 1970 AFL–NFL merger, the Dolphins joined the NFL.

The team made its first Super Bowl appearance in Super Bowl VI, losing to the Dallas Cowboys, 24–3. The following year, the Dolphins completed the NFL's only perfect season, culminating in a Super Bowl win, winning all 14 of their regular season games, and all three of their playoff games, including Super Bowl VII. They were the third NFL team to accomplish a perfect regular season. The next year, the Dolphins won Super Bowl VIII, becoming the first team to appear in three consecutive Super Bowls, and the second team (the first AFL/AFC team) to win back-to-back championships. Miami also appeared in Super Bowl XVII and Super Bowl XIX, losing both games.

For most of their early history, the Dolphins were coached by Don Shula, the most successful head coach in professional football history in terms of total games won. Under Shula, the Dolphins posted losing records in only two of his 26 seasons as the head coach. During the period spanning 1983 to the end of 1999, quarterback Dan Marino became one of the most prolific passers in NFL history, breaking numerous league passing records. Marino led the Dolphins to five division titles, 10 playoff appearances and Super Bowl XIX before retiring following the 1999 season.

In 2008, the Dolphins became the first team in NFL history to win their division and make a playoff appearance following a league-worst 1–15 season. That same season, the Dolphins upset the 16–0 New England Patriots on the road during Week 3, handing the Patriots' their first regular season loss since December 10, 2006, in which coincidentally, they were also beaten by the Dolphins.

New England Patriots

The New England Patriots are a professional American football team based in the Greater Boston area. The Patriots compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) East division. The team plays its home games at Gillette Stadium in the town of Foxborough, Massachusetts, which is located 21 miles (34 km) southwest of downtown Boston, Massachusetts and 20 miles (32 km) northeast of downtown Providence, Rhode Island. The Patriots are also headquartered at Gillette Stadium.

An original member of the American Football League (AFL), the Patriots joined the NFL in the 1970 merger of the two leagues. The team changed its name from the original Boston Patriots after relocating to Foxborough in 1971. The Patriots played their home games at Foxboro Stadium from 1971 to 2001, then moved to Gillette Stadium at the start of the 2002 season. The Patriots' rivalry with the New York Jets is considered one of the most bitter rivalries in the NFL.

Since the arrival of head coach Bill Belichick and quarterback Tom Brady in 2000, the Patriots have since become one of the most successful teams in NFL history, winning 16 AFC East titles in 18 seasons since 2001, without a losing season in that period. The franchise has since set numerous notable records, including most wins in a ten-year period (126, in 2003–2012), an undefeated 16-game regular season in 2007, the longest winning streak consisting of regular season and playoff games in NFL history (a 21-game streak from October 2003 to October 2004), and the most consecutive division titles won by a team in NFL history (ten straight division titles from 2009 to 2018). The team owns the record for most Super Bowls reached (nine) and won (six) by a head coach–quarterback tandem, most Super Bowl appearances overall (eleven), tied with the Pittsburgh Steelers for the most Super Bowl wins (six), and also tied with the Denver Broncos for the most Super Bowl losses (five).

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