ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The ACC Men's Basketball Tournament (popularly known as the ACC Tournament) is the conference championship tournament in basketball for the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The tournament has been held every year since 1954, the ACC's first season. It is a single-elimination tournament and seeding is based on regular season records. The winner, declared conference champion, receives the conference's automatic bid to the NCAA men's basketball tournament.

ACC Men's Basketball Tournament
Conference basketball championship
Atlantic Coast Conference logo
SportBasketball
ConferenceAtlantic Coast Conference
Number of teams15
FormatSingle-elimination tournament
Current stadiumRotates – Spectrum Center in 2019
Current locationRotates – Charlotte, North Carolina in 2019
Played1954–present
Last contest2019
Current championDuke Blue Devils
Most championshipsDuke Blue Devils (21)
TV partner(s)ESPN, ACC Network
Official websiteTheACC.com Men's Basketball

Tournament Champions

Since July 1, 1961, the ACC's bylaws have included the phrase "and the winner shall be the conference champion" in referring to the tournament, meaning that the conference tournament winner is the only champion of the ACC. The ACC is unique in college basketball in that it does not recognize a regular season champion in any way, although it does permit the regular season winner to hang a banner if it wishes, so long as the banner makes it clear that the title is not official.[1]

Year Champion Score Runner-up Tournament MVP Venue City State
1954 NC State 82–80 (OT) Wake Forest Dickie Hemric Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1955 NC State 87–77 Duke Ron Shavlik Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1956 NC State 76–54 Wake Forest Vic Molodet Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1957 North Carolina 95–75 South Carolina Lennie Rosenbluth Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1958 Maryland 86–75 North Carolina Nick Davis Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1959 NC State 80–56 North Carolina Lou Pucillo Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1960 Duke 64–59 Wake Forest Doug Kistler Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1961 Wake Forest 96–81 Duke Len Chappell Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1962 Wake Forest 77–68 Clemson Len Chappell Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1963 Duke 71–66 Wake Forest Art Heyman Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1964 Duke 80–59 Wake Forest Jeff Mullins Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1965 NC State 91–85 Duke Larry Worsley Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1966 Duke 71–66 NC State Steve Vacendak Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina
1967 North Carolina 82–73 Duke Larry Miller Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1968 North Carolina 87–50 NC State Larry Miller Charlotte Coliseum (Independence)[note 1] Charlotte North Carolina
1969 North Carolina 85–74 Duke Charlie Scott Charlotte Coliseum (Independence)[note 1] Charlotte North Carolina
1970 NC State 42–39 (2OT) South Carolina Vann Williford Charlotte Coliseum (Independence)[note 1] Charlotte North Carolina
1971 South Carolina 52–51 North Carolina John Roche Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1972 North Carolina 73–64 Maryland Bob McAdoo Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1973 NC State 76–74 Maryland Tommy Burleson Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1974 NC State 103–100 (OT) Maryland Tommy Burleson Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1975 North Carolina 70–66 NC State Phil Ford Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1976 Virginia 67–62 North Carolina Wally Walker Capital Centre Landover Maryland
1977 North Carolina 75–69 Virginia John Kuester Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1978 Duke 85–77 Wake Forest Jim Spanarkel Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1979 North Carolina 71–63 Duke Dudley Bradley Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1980 Duke 73–72 Maryland Albert King Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1981 North Carolina 61–60 Maryland Sam Perkins Capital Centre Landover Maryland
1982 North Carolina 47–45 Virginia James Worthy Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1983 NC State 81–78 Virginia Sidney Lowe The Omni Atlanta Georgia
1984 Maryland 74–62 Duke Len Bias Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1985 Georgia Tech 57–54 North Carolina Mark Price The Omni Atlanta Georgia
1986 Duke 68–67 Georgia Tech Johnny Dawkins Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1987 NC State 68–67 North Carolina Vinny Del Negro Capital Centre Landover Maryland
1988 Duke 65–61 North Carolina Danny Ferry Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1989 North Carolina 77–74 Duke J.R. Reid The Omni Atlanta Georgia
1990 Georgia Tech 70–61 Virginia Brian Oliver Charlotte Coliseum (Tyvola) [2] Charlotte North Carolina
1991 North Carolina 96–74 Duke Rick Fox Charlotte Coliseum (Tyvola) [2] Charlotte North Carolina
1992 Duke 94–74 North Carolina Christian Laettner Charlotte Coliseum (Tyvola) [2] Charlotte North Carolina
1993 Georgia Tech 77–75 North Carolina James Forrest Charlotte Coliseum (Tyvola) [2] Charlotte North Carolina
1994 North Carolina 73–66 Virginia Jerry Stackhouse Charlotte Coliseum (Tyvola) [2] Charlotte North Carolina
1995 Wake Forest 82–80 (OT) North Carolina Randolph Childress Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1996 Wake Forest 75–74 Georgia Tech Tim Duncan Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1997 North Carolina 64–54 NC State Shammond Williams Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1998 North Carolina 83–68 Duke Antawn Jamison Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
1999 Duke 96–73 North Carolina Elton Brand Charlotte Coliseum (Tyvola) [2] Charlotte North Carolina
2000 Duke 81–68 Maryland Jason Williams Charlotte Coliseum (Tyvola) [2] Charlotte North Carolina
2001 Duke 79–53 North Carolina Shane Battier Georgia Dome Atlanta Georgia
2002 Duke 91–61 NC State Carlos Boozer Charlotte Coliseum (Tyvola) [2] Charlotte North Carolina
2003 Duke 84–77 NC State Daniel Ewing Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
2004 Maryland 95–87 (OT) Duke John Gilchrist Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
2005 Duke 69–64 Georgia Tech J. J. Redick MCI Center Washington D.C.
2006 Duke 78–76 Boston College J. J. Redick Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
2007 North Carolina 89–80 NC State Brandan Wright St. Pete Times Forum Tampa Florida
2008 North Carolina 86–81 Clemson Tyler Hansbrough Charlotte Bobcats Arena Charlotte North Carolina
2009 Duke 79–69 Florida State Jon Scheyer Georgia Dome Atlanta Georgia
2010 Duke 65–61 Georgia Tech Kyle Singler Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
2011 Duke 75–58 North Carolina Nolan Smith Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
2012 Florida State 85–82 North Carolina Michael Snaer Philips Arena Atlanta Georgia
2013 Miami 87–77 North Carolina Shane Larkin Greensboro Coliseum[3] Greensboro North Carolina
2014 Virginia 72–63 Duke Joe Harris Greensboro Coliseum[3] Greensboro North Carolina
2015 Notre Dame 90–82 North Carolina Jerian Grant Greensboro Coliseum[3] Greensboro North Carolina
2016 North Carolina 61–57 Virginia Joel Berry II Verizon Center Washington D.C.
2017 Duke 75–69 Notre Dame Luke Kennard Barclays Center Brooklyn New York
2018 Virginia 71–63 North Carolina Kyle Guy Barclays Center Brooklyn New York
2019 Duke 73–63 Florida State Zion Williamson Spectrum Center Charlotte North Carolina
2020 Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina
2021 Capital One Arena Washington D.C.
2022 Barclays Center Brooklyn New York
  1. ^ a b c The Charlotte Coliseum on Independence Boulevard opened in 1956, closed in 1988 when the Charlotte Coliseum on Tyvola Road opened (that arena was demolished 2007), reopened in 1993 as Independence Arena. Cricket Wireless held naming rights from 2001 to 2006, and Bojangles' has held naming rights since 2008.

Venues

Venue City State Appearances Last Years Notes
Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro North Carolina 27 2015 1967, 1971–75, 1977–80, 1982, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1995–98, 2003–04, 2006, 2010–11, 2013–15, 2020* [v 1]
Reynolds Coliseum Raleigh North Carolina 13 1966 1954–66
Charlotte Coliseum (Tyvola Road, demolished 2007) Charlotte North Carolina 8 2002 1990–94, 1999–2000, 2002
Charlotte Coliseum (Independence) Charlotte North Carolina 3 1970 1968, 1969, 1970 [v 2]
Capital Centre Landover Maryland 3 1987 1976, 1981, 1987
Omni Coliseum Atlanta Georgia 3 1989 1983, 1985, 1989
Georgia Dome Atlanta Georgia 2 2009 2001, 2009
Capital One Arena Washington D.C. 2 2016 2005, 2016, 2021* [v 3]
Barclays Center[4] Brooklyn New York 2 2018 2017, 2018, 2022*
Spectrum Center Charlotte North Carolina 2 2008 2008, 2019 [v 4]
Amalie Arena Tampa Florida 1 2007 2007 [v 5]
State Farm Arena Atlanta Georgia 1 2012 2012 [v 6]

Notes

* Denotes the venue for a future ACC Men's Basketball Tournament.

  1. ^ The Greensboro Coliseum is next scheduled to host the tournament in 2020.
  2. ^ Charlotte Coliseum (Independence) adopted its current name of Bojangles' Coliseum in 2008, but after reopening in 1993, it was also known as Independence Arena and Cricket Arena, but never hosted an ACC men's tournament under any of its later names. (It hosted the ACC Women's Tournament from 1997–1999 as Independence Arena.)
  3. ^ Capital One Arena was known as MCI Center when it hosted in 2005, and the Verizon Center in 2016.
  4. ^ Spectrum Center was known as Charlotte Bobcats Arena when it served as the 2008 host. It was later known as Time Warner Cable Arena, but never hosted under that name.
  5. ^ Amalie Arena was known as the St. Pete Times Forum when it hosted in 2007. It was originally known as the Ice Palace, and later as the Tampa Bay Times Forum, but never hosted under either name.
  6. ^ State Farm Arena was known as Philips Arena when it hosted in 2012.

Tournament championships by school

School Year joined[5] Winners Years
Duke 1953 21 1960, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1978, 1980, 1986, 1988, 1992, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2017, 2019
North Carolina 1953 18 1957, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1972, 1975, 1977, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1989, 1991, 1994, 1997, 1998, 2007, 2008, 2016
NC State 1953 10 1954, 1955, 1956, 1959, 1965, 1970, 1973,[a] 1974, 1983, 1987
Wake Forest 1953 4 1961, 1962, 1995, 1996
Maryland 1953[b] 3 1958, 1984, 2004
Georgia Tech 1978 3 1985, 1990, 1993
Virginia 1953 3 1976, 2014, 2018
Florida State 1991 1 2012
Miami 2004 1 2013
Notre Dame 2013 1 2015
South Carolina 1953[c] 1 1971
Clemson 1953 0
Virginia Tech 2004 0
Boston College 2005 0
Syracuse 2013 0
Pittsburgh 2013 0
Louisville 2014 0

Footnotes

References

General
  • "2009–10 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Media Guide". Atlantic Coast Conference. 2009. p. 82. Archived from the original on 2010-12-31. Retrieved March 10, 2010.
  • "NCAA Coaching Records" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. 2009. pp. 158–159 stating Coach of the year awards. Retrieved March 10, 2010.
Specific
  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h The Charlotte Coliseum on Tyvola Road opened in 1988 and closed in 2005, demolished in 2007.
  3. ^ a b c "Future ACC Tournament Sites Announced". The Atlantic Coast Conference. May 17, 2006. Retrieved May 24, 2012.
  4. ^ ESPN. "Source: ACC, Barclays have deal". Retrieved March 25, 2014.
  5. ^ a b 2009–10 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Media Guide 2009, p. 82
  6. ^ a b c Crawford, Jacob (December 26, 2003). "Complete History of NC State Basketball". NorthCarolinaState.scout.com. Archived from the original on 2009-05-17. Retrieved March 10, 2010.
  7. ^ "University of Maryland and Rutgers University Become Official Members of Big Ten Conference" (Press release). Big Ten Conference. July 1, 2014. Archived from the original on 2016-06-26. Retrieved January 13, 2015.
  8. ^ "SEC Men's Basketball". secsports.com. Southeastern Conference. 2010. Archived from the original on 21 May 2010. Retrieved May 31, 2010.
1978 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 1978 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament was held in Greensboro, North Carolina, at the Greensboro Coliseum from March 1–4. Duke defeated Wake Forest, 85–77, to win the championship. Jim Spanarkel of Duke was named the tournament MVP.

1983 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 1983 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament was held in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Omni Coliseum from March 11–13. NC State defeated Virginia, 81–78, to win the championship. Sidney Lowe of NC State was named MVP. It was the first time the event was held in Atlanta.

2000 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2000 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament took place from March 9–12 in Charlotte, North Carolina, at the second Charlotte Coliseum. Duke won the tournament for the second year in a row, defeating Maryland in the championship game. Jason Williams of Duke was the tournament MVP.

2001 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2001 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament took place from March 8–11 in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Georgia Dome. Duke won the tournament for the third year in a row, defeating North Carolina in the championship game. Duke's Shane Battier won the tournament's Most Valuable Player award.

Duke went on to win the 2001 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament in the following weeks. It was their third national championship. Duke defeated ACC rival Maryland in the Final Four. Duke also defeated Maryland in the ACC semifinal round.

The 2001 ACC Tournament Championship Game pitted the #1 and #2 seeds against each other for the second consecutive year.

The 2001 edition of the ACC Tournament was the first one held in the Georgia Dome. The tournament had previously been held in Atlanta at the Omni. The tournament returned to the Georgia Dome in 2009.

2003 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2003 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament took place from March 13–16 in Greensboro, North Carolina, at the Greensboro Coliseum. The 2003 edition marked the 50th ACC Tournament. Duke won the tournament for the fifth straight time, defeating NC State in the championship game for the second year in a row. Duke's Daniel Ewing won the tournament's Most Valuable Player award.

2004 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2004 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament took place from March 11–14 in Greensboro, North Carolina, at the Greensboro Coliseum. The Maryland Terrapins won the tournament as the #6 seed, upsetting #3 seed Wake Forest, #2 seed NC State, and top seed Duke in succession on their way to the championship. It was Maryland's third tournament title, and their first since 1984. Maryland's John Gilchrist won the Most Valuable Player award. Maryland's championship ended Duke's streak of five straight ACC championships.

The 2004 ACC Tournament was the final event with nine participating teams. Virginia Tech and University of Miami from the Big East Conference joined the ACC for the 2004–2005 season.

2006 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2006 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament took place from March 9–12 in Greensboro, North Carolina, at the Greensboro Coliseum. Duke won the tournament for the 16th time. Duke's J.J. Redick won the tournament's Most Valuable Player Award for the second year in a row.

The 2006 ACC Tournament was the first tournament with 12 teams participating. Boston College made its first appearance in the tournament, reaching the championship game before losing to Duke. 12th-seeded Wake Forest made a Cinderella run, beating 5th-seeded Florida State and 4th-seeded NC State on their way to the semifinal round, before losing to eventual champions Duke.

Miami and Boston College won their first ACC Tournament games in 2006. Miami defeated Clemson in the first round. Boston College defeated Maryland in the quarterfinal round.

2008 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2008 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament took place from March 13–16, 2008, at the Charlotte Bobcats Arena in Charlotte, North Carolina. The tournament was broadcast on the ESPN family of networks, along with Raycom Sports in the ACC footprint. Both broadcasters had the games available in HD.

Florida State and Miami won their first-round games for the second year in a row. Miami became the first #5 seed to win an ACC tournament game since the conference expanded to 12 teams. The past two seasons, the #12 seed pulled off the upset.

Tyler Hansbrough of North Carolina was named tournament MVP.

2009 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2009 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament took place from March 12–15 at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. The tournament was broadcast on the ESPN family of networks, along with Raycom Sports in the ACC footprint.

The championship game matched Duke against Florida State, who made their first appearance in the ACC championship game since joining the league in 1992. Duke won 79–69 for their 8th conference title in 11 years.

2010 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2010 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament, a part of the 2009–10 NCAA Division I men's basketball season, took place from March 11–March 14 at the Greensboro Coliseum in Greensboro, North Carolina.

This tournament was notable for the high number of upsets, with the higher seed winning only twice in the first two rounds, and the 11 and 12 seeds progressing to the semifinals. The championship game matched Duke against Georgia Tech. It was the third time a team has played 4 games (NC State in 1997 and 2007). Duke won the championship game, 65–61, to win its 9th ACC championship in 12 years. Duke went on to win the national championship.

2012 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2012 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament, part of the 2011–12 NCAA Division I men's basketball season, took place from March 8–11 at the Philips Arena in Atlanta. The Florida State Seminoles gave the state of Florida its first-ever ACC tournament win, capturing their first ACC championship in their 21st season in the league.

2013 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2013 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament took place from March 14–17 at the Greensboro Coliseum in Greensboro, North Carolina. For the second consecutive year, a team from the state of Florida captured its first-ever ACC Men's Basketball Tournament title, as the Miami Hurricanes won the championship. The 2013 tournament was the final ACC Tournament with 12 teams, as Pittsburgh, Syracuse, and Notre Dame joined the ACC for the 2013–14 season.

2014 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2014 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament was the postseason men's basketball tournament for the Atlantic Coast Conference held from March 12–16 in Greensboro, North Carolina, at the Greensboro Coliseum. This was the first ACC Tournament to include 15 teams, a result of the conference adding Syracuse, Pitt, and Notre Dame, and also the last to feature Maryland, which left after the season for the Big Ten Conference. Seeds #5 through #9 received a first-round bye, and the top four seeds received a first- and second-round "double bye".

Top-seeded Virginia won the tournament under the guidance of Tony Bennett, defeating Florida State, Pittsburgh, and then Duke in the championship game. It was their second ACC tournament championship and first since 1976. Virginia had lost its most recent five appearances in the tournament championship game, losing to North Carolina in 1977, 1982, and 1994, to NC State in 1983, and to Georgia Tech in 1990. The Cavaliers placed four players on the all-tournament teams, and their leading scorer, Joe Harris, was named tournament MVP.

2015 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2015 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament was the postseason men's basketball tournament for the Atlantic Coast Conference, held at the Greensboro Coliseum in Greensboro, North Carolina, from March 10–14, 2015. The tournament included fourteen of the fifteen ACC teams, as Syracuse did not compete due to a self-imposed postseason ban. Seeds 5 through 10 received a first-round bye, and the top four seeds received a "double bye" through the first round and second rounds. The 2015 tournament was the first to begin on a Tuesday and the first since 1981 to finish on a Saturday. The semifinals and championship game were played in the evening instead of their traditional afternoon timeslot. It was the fourth time a team has played 4 games (NC State in 1997 and 2007, Georgia Tech in 2010). ESPN and the ACC Network televised all games, and the championship game was moved to Saturday to facilitate a prime-time broadcast on ESPN.

2016 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2016 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament is the postseason men's basketball tournament for the Atlantic Coast Conference and was held at the Verizon Center in Washington D.C. from March 8–12, 2016. The winner of the tournament receives the conference's automatic bid to the 2016 NCAA Tournament. The tournament included 14 of the 15 ACC teams due to Louisville's self-imposed postseason ban. This was the 20th consecutive ACC Tournament that featured Duke or UNC in the championship game.

2017 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2017 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament was the postseason men's basketball tournament for the Atlantic Coast Conference and was held at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York from March 7 to 11, 2017. Duke became the first team in history to win four straight games in the ACC Tournament and received the conference's automatic bid to the 2017 NCAA Tournament with a 75–69 win over Notre Dame.

2018 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2018 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament was the postseason men's basketball tournament for the Atlantic Coast Conference held at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, New York from March 6–10, 2018. It was the 65th annual edition of the tournament, and the second year in a row being held at Barclays Center. The Virginia Cavaliers entered the tournament as the top seed, with a 17–1 conference record (28–2 overall) under the guidance of Tony Bennett. UVA also began the tournament unanimously ranked number 1 in the country in both major polls.

The Cavaliers defeated Louisville 75–58 and Clemson 64–58 to secure a place in the tournament championship game. They defeated North Carolina 71–63 in the championship game to become tournament champion. Sophomore guard Kyle Guy was named Tournament MVP. Games were shown on over-the-air television in local media markets by the syndicated ACCN and simulcast nationally on various ESPN cable networks.

Both the Virginia–North Carolina title game and Duke–North Carolina semifinal game set the Barclays Center attendance record for college basketball games, and conference leadership vowed to return the ACC Tournament to New York in the near future.

2019 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 2019 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament was the 66th annual postseason men's basketball tournament for the Atlantic Coast Conference, held March 12–16, 2019 at the Spectrum Center in Charlotte, North Carolina.

The Virginia Cavaliers and North Carolina Tar Heels entered the tournament as the top two seeds, both with 16–2 conference, and ranked #2 and #3 in the country respectively. Both teams were defeated in the semifinals, by the #4 Florida State Seminoles (ranked #12 nationally) and the #3 Duke Blue Devils (ranked #6 nationally). Duke defeated Florida State, 73–63, in the championship game, claiming their 21st ACC Tournament title and 15th during head coach Mike Krzyzewski's tenure. Duke's Zion Williamson was named the tournament's MVP.

ACC Men's Basketball Tournament
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