A695 road

A695 road is a road in Northern England linking Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, with Hexham, Northumberland. It was part of the proposed A695(M) Shields Road Motorway.[1]

UK road A695

A695
Major junctions
West endHexham
54°58′13″N 2°05′49″W / 54.9703°N 2.0970°W
  A6079
A68
A1
A69
A186
6082
A189
A167(M)
East endNewcastle-upon-Tyne
54°58′13″N 1°37′09″W / 54.9703°N 1.6191°W
Road network

References

  1. ^ Pathetic Motorways - A695 (M)

Coordinates: 54°57′31″N 1°52′20″W / 54.9587°N 1.8721°W

Blaydon-on-Tyne

Blaydon is a town in the North East of England in the Metropolitan Borough of Gateshead - historically in County Durham. Blaydon, and neighbouring Winlaton, which Blaydon is now contiguous with, form the postal town of Blaydon-on-Tyne. The Blaydon/Winlaton resident population in 2011 was 13,896.Between 1894 and 1974, Blaydon was an urban district which extended inland from the Tyne along the River Derwent for ten miles (16 km), and included the mining communities of Chopwell and High Spen, the villages of Rowlands Gill, Blackhall Mill, Barlow, Winlaton Mill and Stella, as well as Blaydon and Winlaton. During its existence, the Urban District's fourteen and a half square miles constituted the second largest administrative district by area, on Tyneside, after Newcastle upon Tyne.

Broomhaugh

Broomhaugh is a village in Northumberland, in England. It is situated between Hexham and Newcastle, to the south of the River Tyne near Riding Mill, and adjacent to the A695 road.

Broomhaugh lies at the eastern edge of the village of Riding Mill. Broomhaugh consists of a mix of stone buildings dating back to the 16th and 17th centuries, an Edwardian terrace and two brick-built terraces linked to the development of the railway between Newcastle and Carlisle. The earlier buildings include a former farm house, farm buildings converted into houses and a Methodist chapel and manse. The majority of the housing is located on what local people refer to as "The Street", which runs down to a former ford across the river Tyne. The Street follows the line of a former drovers' road down which cattle were driven from Scotland to the market towns of northern England.

Ovingham

Ovingham is a civil parish and village in the Tyne Valley of south Northumberland, England. It lies on the River Tyne 10 miles (16 km) east of Hexham with neighbours Prudhoe, Ovington, Wylam and Stocksfield.

The River Tyne provided an obstacle between Ovingham and Prudhoe until 20 December 1883, when a toll bridge (Ovingham Bridge) was finally opened, taking the place of the ferry. The steel tubes are marked Dorman Long Middlesbrough, the firm which designed and built the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Tyne Bridge.

Prudhoe

Prudhoe ( PRUD-ə) is a town in south Northumberland, England, about 11 miles (18 km) west of the city of Newcastle upon Tyne and just south of the River Tyne. The town is sited on a steep, north-facing hill in the Tyne valley and nearby settlements include Ovingham, Ovington, Wylam, Stocksfield, Crawcrook, Hedley on the Hill and Mickley. Prudhoe has a population of over 11,500, measured at 11,675 in the 2011 Census. Today, it has largely become a commuter town for nearby Newcastle.

Redheugh Bridge

The Redheugh Bridge (, REH-dyuuf) is a road bridge spanning the River Tyne west of Newcastle upon Tyne city centre on the north bank and Gateshead town centre on the south bank, in North East England. It currently carries the A189 road.

Scotswood Bridge

Scotswood Bridge is one of the main bridges crossing the River Tyne in North East England. It links the west end of Newcastle upon Tyne on the north bank of the river with the MetroCentre and Blaydon in Gateshead on the south bank. It is situated 5.2 km (3.2 mi) upstream of the better-known city centre bridges.

Scotswood Railway Bridge

Scotswood Railway Bridge is a pipeline bridge and former railway bridge crossing the River Tyne in North East England. It previously carried the Newcastle and Carlisle Railway between Scotswood and Blaydon stations.

A roads in Zone 6 of the Great Britain road numbering scheme

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