A614 road


The A614 is a main road in England running through the counties of Nottinghamshire, South Yorkshire and the East Riding of Yorkshire.

UK road A614

A614
A614 road
The A614
Route information
Length97.8 mi[1] (157.4 km)
Major junctions
South endCalverton
53°01′21″N 1°07′54″W / 53.0226°N 1.1318°W
North endBridlington
54°05′09″N 0°13′13″W / 54.0859°N 0.2203°W
Location
Primary
destinations
Goole
Road network

Route

Beginning at Redhill, near Calverton in Nottinghamshire at a roundabout with the A60, the road meets the A6097 at a junction which looks like a roundabout but actually is not, crosses the Robin Hood Way then passes Bilsthorpe. At Rufford there is a Center Parcs resort and Rufford Country Park. The road meets several other roads at a major roundabout at Ollerton near a Shell petrol station. This is near Edwinstowe, famed for its connections with Robin Hood. The road passes through Clumber Park and goes past the entrance to the former Army Proteus training camp. The road passes over the River Poulter. At Apleyhead Wood, the road meets the A1 and A57. Major works were started on the Apleyhead junction in 2006 to convert the roundabout into a dual-grade junction (GSJ). This work was completed on 20 May 2008.[2] The A614 overlaps the A1 for 6.3 miles (10.1 km) north.

At junction 34 of the A1(M) at Blyth, next to a large Moto service station, the road runs north to the settlement of Bawtry, passing to the south of a nearby colliery at Harworth. At Bawtry the road meets the A638, a Roman road which heads into Doncaster, passing under the East Coast Main Line here. At Finningley, the road passes around the runway of Robin Hood Airport Doncaster Sheffield, the former RAF Finningley. The road has a level crossing with the Doncaster-Lincoln railway line and the River Torne is crossed. Near Hatfield Woodhouse, the road passes a prison which used to be RAF Lindholme, used by RAF Bomber Command. The road meets the M180 and A18 at a roundabout at Thorne, the former terminus of the A18(M), the M18 at junction 6, follows the River Don for 3.5 miles (5.6 km) then crosses it where the river becomes the Dutch River.

From Goole, the road continues in a north-easterly direction, crosses the M62 and passes over the River Ouse on the iron-girder Boothferry Bridge before intersecting with the M62 at junction 36.

From here, the road becomes a trunk road running through the settlements of Howden, Holme-on-Spalding-Moor, Driffield, ending on the Yorkshire coast at Bridlington, where it joins the A165.

History

Former route in Nottinghamshire

The road used to continue south from the junction with the A60, next to the Little Chef, and overlap the A60. The north-west section of the Nottingham western bypass, up to the A52 junction, near the Queen's Medical Centre (before the Clifton Boulevard was built) was the A614 for some time and is now the A6514. Before renumbering of Clifton Boulevard to the A52, concurrent with the numbering of the A614 to A6514, the section from the A52 to A606 was also A614.

Former route in the East Riding of Yorkshire

Originally, the A614 went from Thorne via Snaith to Selby. The current section from Goole through Rawcliffe was the A161 (from Gainsborough). From Goole to Holme-on-Spalding Moor, it was the A1041. From here through Market Weighton, to Driffield, it was the A163. From here to Bridlington, it used to be the A166 (which is the road from York). More recently, it finished at Holme-on-Spalding-Moor, then what is now the A614, carried on north as the A163 (from Selby), then as the A164 (from Beverley) just before Driffield.

Fatal accident in February 2009

On Friday, 13 February 2009 just after 23:00 six people were killed in a head-on collision on the road in Nottinghamshire between the Bilsthorpe crossroads and the Eakring turn-off. The victims were four teenagers in one car, and an elderly couple in the other.

The cause of the accident was concluded by the coroner as to have happened as a result of "inappropriate overtaking" by the driver of the teenagers' car. [3]

References

  1. ^ "Directions to A165/A614". Google. Retrieved 29 April 2013.
  2. ^ "Roads News". Archived from the original on 19 June 2012. Retrieved 5 October 2012.
  3. ^ "Crash road speed 'should be cut'". BBC News. 15 June 2011. Retrieved 14 June 2011.

External links

Coordinates: 53°39′21″N 0°59′25″W / 53.6558°N 0.9903°W

Airmyn

Airmyn is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated at the mouth of the River Aire with the River Ouse, approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) north-west of Goole. It lies to the west of the M62 motorway and the A614 road. According to the 2011 UK census, Airmyn parish had a population of 768, a fall from the 2001 UK census figure of 795. The parish covers an area of 1,155.353 hectares (2,854.94 acres).The parish was part of the Goole Rural District in the West Riding of Yorkshire from 1894 to 1974, then in Boothferry district of Humberside until 1996. In the Middle Ages, Airmyn was a small port, and up to the 18th century its dead were taken by boat upstream to be buried at Snaith, as it was quicker to go by river than by horse and cart.

Austerfield

Austerfield is a village and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster (part of South Yorkshire, England), on the border with Nottinghamshire. It lies to the north-east of Bawtry on the A614 road to Finningley, and is located at 53° 26' 30" North, 1° 0' West, at an elevation of around 23 feet (7 metres) above sea level. It is close to the River Idle, and has a population of 571, reducing to 536 at the 2011 Census.Its name derives from the Germanic 'Ouestraefeld' meaning 'eastern field'.

In 702 the Council of Austerfield was convened here by King Aldfrith of Northumbria. Austerfield was then on the boundary between the two Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of Northumbria and Mercia, attended by Berhtwald, Archbishop of Canterbury to decide on whether Saint Wilfrid should become Archbishop of York.

Austerfield contains the 11th century church of St Helena, built in 1080 by John de Builli, where William Bradford, "Pilgrim Father" and governor of Plymouth Colony, who was born in Austerfield, was baptised. The ancient font in which Bradford was baptised was accidentally discovered at a local farm 40 years ago, and can be seen at the church.

English comedy writer Roy Clarke, known for 'Last of the Summer Wine' and 'Open All Hours', was born here in 1930.

Bainton, East Riding of Yorkshire

Bainton is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 6 miles (10 km) south-west of Driffield on the A614 road.

According to the 2011 UK census, Bainton parish had a population of 334, an increase on the 2001 UK census figure of 282. The parish covers an area of 1,608.08 hectares (3,973.7 acres).Bainton was served by Bainton railway station on the Selby to Driffield Line between 1890 and 1954.Bainton Grade I listed Anglican church is dedicated to St Andrew. Pevsner noted that the church was totally rebuilt in the 1330s or 1340s by the rector William de Brocklesby, except for the south-west corner of the chancel with its priest's doorway, which are c. 1300. Until 1715 the tower supported a spire. The font is Norman, and the pews 18th century. A tomb to Sir Edmund de Mauley lies in the south aisle; [de Mauley, Steward to Edward II, died at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314]. The tomb has an ogee canopy, crocketed gable and flying angels holding the soul of Sir Edmund in a napkin. There is also a brass to Roger Godeale, died 1429. A south porch and vestry were added by Henry Wheatley in 1843, and a restoration carried out by "Fowler of Louth" in 1866. The church's listed rectory, south of the church, is of late Georgian period. According to Pevsner a local tradition connects the rectory's coniferous garden with Paxton The rectory's coach house and stables are also listed buildings.

Burton Agnes

Burton Agnes is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated on the A614 road midway between Driffield and Bridlington.

Local landmarks include an Elizabethan manor house, Burton Agnes Hall, and a Norman manor house, Burton Agnes Manor House. Both buildings are recorded in the National Heritage List for England, maintained by Historic England as Grade I listed. The church, dedicated to St Martin, was designated as Grade I listed in 1966.The civil parish is formed by the village of Burton Agnes and the hamlets of Gransmoor and Thornholme.

According to the 2011 UK Census, Burton Agnes parish had a population of 497, an increase of one over the 2001 UK Census figure.Burton Agnes holds an annual Scarecrow Festival during which the village is decorated with scarecrows. The festival began in 2004 and was devised by a group of children to raise money.Burton Agnes primary school is on Rudston Road, also on which are playing fields, close to the cemetery. The playing fields are the base for football and cricket teams. There is a small bowls field near the football pitch. Bridlington Archery Club also uses the facility.

Burton Agnes railway station on the Yorkshire Coast Line from Hull to Scarborough served the village until it closed on 5 January 1970.On 17 September 1947 a truck carrying German prisoners of war was in collision with a train at the Burton Agnes level crossing killing two British and ten German soldiers. On 23 December 2013 a plaque was unveiled at the site of the crash in remembrance those who died.

Carnaby, East Riding of Yorkshire

Carnaby is a small village and civil parish on the A614 road in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 2 miles (3 km) south-west of Bridlington town centre.

The civil parish is formed by the villages of Carnaby and Haisthorpe and the hamlet of Wilsthorpe.

According to the 2011 UK Census, Carnaby parish had a population of 415, an increase on the 2001 UK Census figure of 300.The church dedicated to St John the Baptist was designated a Grade II* listed building in 1966 and is now recorded in the National Heritage List for England, maintained by Historic England.During the Second World War, Carnaby Aerodrome served as an emergency landing site for crippled planes. Specially built to cater for stricken aircraft, the airfield had an extra large runway, 9,000 feet (2.7 km) in length and 700 feet (210 m) wide. The airfield also operated a fog dispersion system, nicknamed FIDO.

After the war, the site was used to store Thor IRBM Missiles. The airfield finally closed in 1963 and is now an industrial estate, a large source of employment for the local area.

Carnaby railway station on the Yorkshire Coast Line from Hull to Scarborough served the village until it closed on 5 January 1970. However, people can still travel to Hull, Bridlington, Driffield and Scarborough by using the EYMS bus route number '121' that has alternative bus times.In 1974, the Satra Motors Car Importation and Preparation Centre was opened at Carnaby, upgrading imported Russian built Lada and Moskvich cars for British showrooms. Although Moskvich had stopped importing cars to Britain by the end of the 1970s, Lada continued until July 1997, when it withdrew from Britain, sparking the closure of the Satra centre.

Carnaby Temple, an octagonal folly stands in fields about 1 mile (1.6 km) north of Carnaby. It was built by Sir George Strickland, owner of Boynton Hall, in 1770 and is locally known as 'The Pepperpot'. The structure is based on the Tower of the Winds which is on the Roman Agora in Athens. In 1952 it was given Grade II listed building status.

Finningley

Finningley is a village and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster, in South Yorkshire, England. Historically part of Nottinghamshire, Finningley lies along the A614 road, about six miles from the centre of Doncaster, at 53°29′N 0°59′W, and at an elevation of around 23 feet above sea level. According to the 2001 census it had a population of 1,442, increasing slightly to 1,497 at the 2011 Census.

Goole Academy

Goole Academy, is a mixed 11–18 secondary school located in Goole, East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated just off the A614 road in the east of Goole.

Harpham

Harpham is a small village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is located just south of the A614 road, approximately 5 miles (8 km) north-east of Driffield and 7 miles (11 km) south-west of Bridlington.

The civil parish is formed by the village of Harpham and the hamlets of Lowthorpe and Ruston Parva.

According to the 2011 UK census, Harpham parish had a population of 303, a decline on the 2001 UK census figure of 318.Three Roman mosaics were found near Harpham in 1905, and three more were discovered in 1950. The first three are now in the Hull and East Riding Museum. They are simply patterned. One represented a rectangular maze, one of only five examples known in Roman mosaics in Britain.It is here that St John of Beverley was born in the 7th century; he became the Bishop of Hexham as well as the Bishop of York. The church is dedicated to him and was designated a Grade I listed building in 1966 and is now recorded in the National Heritage List for England, maintained by Historic England. The Well of St John, the local well, is named after him and is believed by many to have healing powers. The well is designated as a Grade II listed building.In 1823 Harpham was a civil parish in the Wapentake of Dickering. The St Quintin family were Lords of Harpham. The foundations of the St Quintin mansion were recorded as being to the west of the church. The church contains St Quintin burials in the north aisle and a stained glass window to Sir William St Quintin, twenty-eighth in succession, who died in 1777. Baines also notes the village as being wholly agricultural, with a population of 251. Occupations included eight farmers, two grocers, two shoemakers, a blacksmith, a wheelwright, a tailor, a butcher, and the landlord of the Anchor public house. There was also a linen manufacturer. A carrier operated between the village and Bridlington once a week.The village gave its name to HMS Harpham, a Ham class minesweeper.

Howden

Howden () is a small historic market town and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It lies in the Vale of York to the north of the M62, on the A614 road about 16 miles (26 km) south-east of York and 3 miles (4.8 km) north of Goole, which lies across the River Ouse.

William the Conqueror gave the town to the Bishops of Durham in 1080. The wapentake of Howdenshire was named after the town.

Kelleythorpe

Kelleythorpe is a hamlet in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England, it forms part of the civil parish of Kirkburn. It is situated in the Yorkshire Wolds on the A614 road near to its junction with the A164 road. It is situated approximately 1 mile (1.6 km) south-west of Driffield town centre.

Kellythorpe Industrial Estate is at the north of the hamlet.

Kirkburn

Kirkburn is a small village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated about 3 miles (5 km) south-west of Driffield town centre and is on the A614 road.

The civil parish is formed by the village of Kirkburn and the hamlets of Eastburn, Kelleythorpe and Southburn.

According to the 2011 UK census, Kirkburn parish had a population of 903, an increase on the 2001 UK census figure of 492.

Lowthorpe

Lowthorpe is a village in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 3 miles (5 km) north-east of Driffield town centre and 7 miles (11 km) south-west of Bridlington town centre.

It lies south-east of the A614 road and just north-west of the Yorkshire Coast railway line from Hull to Scarborough. Lowthorpe railway station served the village until it closed on 5 January 1970.Lowthorpe forms part of the civil parish of Harpham.

The church dedicated to St Martin was designated a Grade II* listed building in 1966 and is now recorded in the National Heritage List for England, maintained by Historic England.In 1823 Lowthorpe (then spelt 'Lowthorp'), was in the Wapentake of Dickering. The church and perpetual curacy was under the patronage of the St Quintin family. Population at the time was 149, with occupations including nine farmers, a linen manufacturer, a corn miller, and a rope maker. Residents included William Thomas St Quintin Esquire, of Lowthorp Hall, and a gentleman.

Middlethorpe, East Riding of Yorkshire

Middlethorpe is a hamlet in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 2.5 miles (4 km) north-east of the market town of Market Weighton. It lies to the southeast of the A614 road and consists principally of Middlethorpe Farm.Middlethorpe forms part of the civil parish of Londesborough.

Middleton on the Wolds

Middleton on the Wolds is a village and civil parish on the Yorkshire Wolds in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated on the A614 road midway between Driffield and Market Weighton.

According to the 2011 UK census, Middleton on the Wolds parish had a population of 825, an increase on the 2001 UK census figure of 774.

Nafferton

Nafferton is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) north-east of Driffield town centre and lies just south of the A614 road.

The village is served by Nafferton railway station on the Yorkshire Coast Line from Hull to Scarborough. According to the 2011 UK Census, Nafferton parish had a population of 2,433, an increase on the 2001 UK Census figure of 2,184.

Portington, East Riding of Yorkshire

Portington is a hamlet in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 3 miles (5 km) east of Howden and lies 0.5 miles (0.8 km) east of the A614 road.

It forms part of the civil parish of Eastrington. Portington lies within the Parliamentary constituency of Haltemprice and Howden an area that mainly consists of middle class suburbs, towns and villages. The area is affluent and has one of the highest proportions of owner-occupiers in the country.Portington Hall is a Grade II listed building.

Rawcliffe, East Riding of Yorkshire

Rawcliffe (or Rawcliffe in Snaith) is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Goole. It lies on the banks of the River Aire just north of the M62 and on the A614 road. Rawcliffe, along with nearby Airmyn, was the location of one of the first reliable reports of the practice of warping in agriculture in the 1730s.

The civil parish is formed by the village of Rawcliffe and the hamlet of Rawcliffe Bridge which lies just to the south-east of the village.

According to the 2011 UK census, Rawcliffe parish had a population of 2,379, an increase on the 2001 UK census figure of 2,087.The village is served by a railway station on the Pontefract Line railway, originally part of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway route to nearby Goole.

The parish was part of the Goole Rural District in the West Riding of Yorkshire from 1894 to 1974, then in Boothferry district of Humberside until 1996.

A 20 acres (8 ha) Local Nature Reserve, Sugar Mill Ponds, has been created on the site of an old sugar factory at Rawcliffe Bridge.

Thornholme

Thornholme is a hamlet in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 5 miles (8 km) south-west of the town of Bridlington and 1 mile (1.6 km) north-east of the village of Burton Agnes. It lies on the A614 road.

It forms part of the civil parish of Burton Agnes.

Welhambridge

Welhambridge is a hamlet in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is situated approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) south-west of the village of Holme-on-Spalding-Moor and 4 miles (6.4 km) north-east of the market town of Howden. It lies around the A614 road bridge over the River Foulness.

It forms part of the civil parish of Holme-on-Spalding-Moor.

A roads in Zone 6 of the Great Britain road numbering scheme

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