A. O. Scott

Anthony Oliver Scott (born July 10, 1966) is a U.S. journalist and film critic. Along with Manohla Dargis, he serves as chief film critic for The New York Times.

A. O. Scott
A. O. Scott (29424113753) (cropped)
Scott in 2016
Born
Anthony Oliver Scott

July 10, 1966 (age 52)
Alma materHarvard University
Occupation
  • Journalist
  • film critic
Children2
Parent(s)Joan Wallach Scott
Donald Scott
RelativesEli Wallach (great uncle)
Anne Jackson (great aunt)

Early life

Scott was born in Northampton, Massachusetts.[1] Both of his parents were professors. His mother, Joan Wallach Scott, is the Harold F. Linder Professor at the School of Social Science in the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey.[2] His father, Donald Scott, is a professor of American history at The City University of New York (CUNY). He is a great nephew of the married acting couple Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson (his maternal grandfather was Eli's brother).[3] Scott is Jewish through his mother's side.[4] Scott attended public schools in Providence, Rhode Island, including Classical High School. He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard in 1988 with a degree in literature.

Career

Scott began his career at The New York Review of Books, where he served as an assistant to Robert B. Silvers.[5] He then served as book critic for Newsday, and also as a contributor to The New York Review of Books and Slate magazine. In 1993, he was a Television reviewer for Daily Variety, using the name Tony Scott.[6]

He joined The New York Times' Arts section in January 2000, following Janet Maslin's retirement from film criticism. (Maslin continues to review genre fiction for the paper.) In 2004 he became chief critic, following Elvis Mitchell's resignation. He and the other film critics at the Times host a video podcast on the subject of film, called Critics' Picks.[7] He is also Distinguished Professor of Film Criticism at Wesleyan University.[8]

Television

In 2006 and 2007, Scott served repeatedly as guest critic on Ebert & Roeper with Richard Roeper in Roger Ebert's absence due to illness. He and Roeper counted down their selections for the top ten films of 2006 and again for 2007. Although Scott did not appear on the show for most of 2008, he continued to release his own list through The New York Times. On October 24, 2009, Scott began counting down his "Best of the Decade" list on At the Movies.

On August 5, 2009, it was announced that Scott, along with Chicago Tribune critic Michael Phillips, would take over hosting duties on At the Movies from Ben Lyons and Ben Mankiewicz, who would no longer be involved in the show. Scott and Phillips began their duties when the show started its new season on September 5, 2009, but ratings were low and the show aired for only one season.[9]

Personal life

He has a son named Ezra and a daughter named Carmen.

He has stated that "Maybe not everyone who is white is a racist, but racism is what makes us white”.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ "A. O. Scott". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Archived from the original on January 6, 2015. Retrieved March 22, 2015.
  2. ^ Scott, Joan Wallach. "The School of Social Science". Institute for Advanced Study. Archived from the original on December 18, 2007. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  3. ^ "Eli Wallach, Ba '36". The Alcalde. Emmis Communications. 88 (4): 28. March 2000. ISSN 1535-993X. Retrieved May 28, 2012.
  4. ^ Scott, A. O. (October 4, 2009). "Jewish History, Popcorn Included". NYTimes.com. The New York Times Company. p. AR1. Retrieved May 28, 2017.
  5. ^ "The Amazing Human Launching Pads". New York magazine. September 26, 2010. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  6. ^ Prouty (1996). Variety and Daily Variety Television Reviews, 1993-1994. Taylor & Francis. p. 113. ISBN 9780824037970.
  7. ^ "Movie Reviews". NYTimes.com. Archived from the original on May 28, 2017. Retrieved May 28, 2017.
  8. ^ "A. O. Scott". The School of The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 15, 2018. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  9. ^ Phil Rosenthal (August 5, 2009). "Chicago Tribune's Michael Phillips, N.Y. Times' A. O. Scott take over 'At the Movies'". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved July 9, 2010.
  10. ^ Scott, A.O. (August 9, 2018). "America's Heart of Darkness". New York Times. The New York Times Company. p. C1. Retrieved March 22, 2019.

External links

Media related to A. O. Scott at Wikimedia Commons

At the Movies (1986 TV program)

At the Movies (originally Siskel & Ebert & the Movies, and later At the Movies with Ebert and Roeper) was an American movie review television program produced by Disney-ABC Domestic Television in which two film critics share their opinions of newly released films. Its original hosts were Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel, the former hosts of Sneak Previews on PBS (1975–1982) and a similarly-titled syndicated series (1982–1986). Following Siskel's death in 1999, Ebert worked with various guest critics until choosing Chicago Sun-Times colleague Richard Roeper as his regular partner in 2000.

Ebert suspended his appearances in 2006 for treatment of thyroid cancer, with various guest hosts substituting for him. From April to August 2008 Michael Phillips, a successor of Siskel at the Chicago Tribune, co-hosted with Roeper. Starting on September 6, 2008, Ben Lyons and Ben Mankiewicz took over as hosts; their partnership lasted only one season. On August 5, 2009, it was announced that Phillips would return to the show as a permanent co-host, teaming with A. O. Scott of The New York Times for what would be the program's final season.

During its run with Siskel and Ebert as hosts, the series was nominated for Primetime Emmy Awards seven times and also for Outstanding Information Series, the last nomination occurring in 1997. It was widely known for the "thumbs up/thumbs down" review summaries given during Siskel's and Ebert's tenures (this was dropped after Ebert ended his association with the program, as the phrase "Two Thumbs Up" is a trademark held by the Siskel and Ebert families). The show aired in syndication in the United States and on CTV in Canada; the show also aired throughout the week on the cable network ReelzChannel.

The show's cancellation was announced on March 24, 2010, and the last episode was aired during the weekend of August 14–15, 2010. The following month, Ebert announced a new version of At the Movies, which launched on public television on January 21, 2011. However, the series went on indefinite hiatus since December 2011 and uncertain to return due to Ebert's death on April 4, 2013.

Beasts of the Southern Wild

Beasts of the Southern Wild is a 2012 American drama film directed, co-written, and co-scored by Benh Zeitlin. It was adapted by Zeitlin and Lucy Alibar from Alibar's one-act play Juicy and Delicious. It stars Quvenzhané Wallis and Dwight Henry. After playing at film festivals, it was released on June 27, 2012, in New York and Los Angeles, and later distribution was expanded.

Beasts of the Southern Wild was met with commercial success and acclaim from critics, with praise going to the filmmaking and Wallis's performance. The film was nominated for four Academy Awards at the 85th Academy Awards, in the categories Best Picture, Best Director (Benh Zeitlin), Best Adapted Screenplay (Lucy Alibar, Benh Zeitlin), and Best Actress (Quvenzhané Wallis). At age 9, Wallis became the youngest Best Actress nominee in history.

Boyhood (film)

Boyhood is a 2014 American epic coming-of-age drama film written and directed by Richard Linklater, and starring Patricia Arquette, Ellar Coltrane, Lorelei Linklater, and Ethan Hawke. Filmed from 2001 to 2013, Boyhood depicts the childhood and adolescence of Mason Evans Jr. (Coltrane) from ages six to eighteen as he grows up in Texas with divorced parents (Arquette and Hawke). Richard Linklater's daughter Lorelei plays Mason's sister, Samantha.

Production began in 2001 and finished in 2013, with Linklater's goal to make a film about growing up. The project began without a completed script, with only basic plot points and the ending written initially. Linklater developed the script throughout production, writing the next year's portion of the film after rewatching the previous year's footage. He incorporated changes he saw in each actor into the script, while also allowing all major actors to participate in the writing process by incorporating their life experiences into their characters' stories.

Boyhood premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival and was released theatrically on July 11, 2014. The film competed in the main competition section of the 64th Berlin International Film Festival, where Linklater won the Silver Bear for Best Director. It received universal acclaim from critics, earning praise for its performances, emotional depth, and characters. It was also nominated for five Golden Globe Awards, winning Best Motion Picture – Drama, Best Director, and Best Supporting Actress for Arquette; five BAFTA awards, winning for Best Director and Best Film; and six Academy Awards, winning Best Supporting Actress for Arquette.

Capernaum (film)

Capernaum, also known as Cafarnaúm or Capharnaüm (Arabic: کفرناحوم‎, translated onscreen as Chaos), is a 2018 Lebanese drama film directed by Nadine Labaki. The screenplay was written by Labaki, Jihad Hojaily and Michelle Keserwany from a story by Labaki, Hojaily, Keserwany, Georges Khabbaz and Khaled Mouzanar. The film stars Syrian refugee child actor Zain Al Rafeea as Zain El Hajj, a 12-year-old living in the slums of Beirut. The film is told in flashback format, focusing on Zain's life, including his encounter with an Ethiopian immigrant Rahil and her infant son Yonas, and leading up to his attempt to sue his parents for child neglect.

The film debuted at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival, where it was selected to compete for the Palme d'Or, and won the Jury Prize. The film received a 15-minute standing ovation following its premiere at Cannes on 17 May 2018. Sony Pictures Classics, which had previously distributed Labaki's Where Do We Go Now?, bought North American and Latin American distribution rights for the film, while Wild Bunch retained the international rights. It received a wider release on 20 September 2018.

The film received critical acclaim, with particular praise given to Labaki's direction, Al Rafeea's performance and the film's "documentary-like realism". Writing for The New York Times, Manohla Dargis and A. O. Scott named it as one of the greatest films of 2018. It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film at the 91st Academy Awards, among several other accolades.

The film has become a sleeper hit at the box office, grossing over $64 million worldwide (including over $48 million in China), against a production budget of $4 million. Capernaum has become the highest-grossing Arabic film, and the highest-grossing Middle-Eastern film of all time.

Comedy of remarriage

The comedy of remarriage is a subgenre of American comedy films of the 1930s and 1940s. At the time, the Production Code, also known as the Hays Code, banned any explicit references to or attempts to justify adultery and illicit sex. The comedy of remarriage enabled filmmakers to evade this provision of the Code. The protagonists divorced, flirted with strangers without risking the wrath of censorship, and then got back together.

The genre was given its name by the philosopher Stanley Cavell in a series of academic articles that later became a book, Pursuits of Happiness: The Hollywood Comedy of Remarriage. Cavell argues that the genre represented Hollywood's crowning achievement, and that beneath all the slapstick and innuendo is a serious effort to create a new basis for marriage centered on mutual love – religious and economic necessity no longer applying for much of the American middle class.

In response to Cavell's article, scholar David R. Shumway claims it is possible "to make too much of the remarriage 'genre'". He points out that "only two of Cavell's seven comedies deal with characters who we actually see interacting as husband and wife for any length of time" and points out that all seven films fit into the screwball comedy genre.More recently, film critics A. O. Scott and David Edelstein both argued that Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind was a 21st-century example of the genre.

Disturbia (film)

Disturbia is a 2007 American thriller film directed by D. J. Caruso, written by Christopher Landon and Carl Ellsworth and stars Shia LaBeouf, David Morse, Sarah Roemer and Carrie-Anne Moss. The film follows a teenager who is placed on house arrest for assault and begins to spy on his neighbors, believing one of them is a possible serial killer.

Partially inspired by Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window, the film released on April 13, 2007. It has an approval rating of 69% on Rotten Tomatoes and grossed $117.8 million against a budget of $20 million.

Film Comment

Film Comment is an arts and culture magazine now published by the Film Society of Lincoln Center, of which it is the official publication. Film Comment features reviews and analysis of mainstream, art-house, and avant-garde filmmaking from around the world. Founded in 1962 and originally released as a quarterly, Film Comment began publishing on a bi-monthly basis with the Nov/Dec issue of 1972. In 2007, the magazine was awarded the Utne Independent Press Award for Best Arts Coverage. The magazine's editorial team also hosts the annual Film Comment Selects at the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

Girls in Their Summer Clothes

"Girls in Their Summer Clothes" is a song by American recording artist Bruce Springsteen, from his album Magic.

Matched with a pop-oriented melody, Springsteen's full-throated singing, and a pop-orchestral arrangement, the lyric portrays a series of warm small-town vignettes:

Frankie's Diner, an old friend on the edge of town,

The neon sign spinning round,

Like a cross over the lost and found.

Fluorescent lights flicker over Pop's Grill,

Shaniqua brings the coffee and asks "Fill?"

and says, "Penny for your thoughts now my boy, Bill""Girls in Their Summer Clothes" has been cited as a singularly "breezy" song on the album, though A. O. Scott of The New York Times notes: "Not that 'Girls in Their Summer Clothes' is untouched by melancholy. Its narrator, after all, stands and watches as the girls of the title 'pass me by.'" Jay Lustig of The Star-Ledger writes that the song "unfolds gradually and at its own eccentric pace, with the music, and Springsteen's vocals, getting progressively more intense."

Hot Tub Time Machine

Hot Tub Time Machine is a 2010 American comedy film directed by Steve Pink and starring John Cusack, Rob Corddry, Craig Robinson, Clark Duke, Crispin Glover, Lizzy Caplan and Chevy Chase. The film was released on March 26, 2010. A sequel, Hot Tub Time Machine 2, was released on February 20, 2015.

Knocked Up

Knocked Up is a 2007 American romantic comedy film written, directed, and co-produced by Judd Apatow, and starring Seth Rogen, Katherine Heigl, Paul Rudd, and Leslie Mann. It follows the repercussions of a drunken one-night stand between a slacker and a just-promoted media personality that results in an unintended pregnancy.

The film was released on June 1, 2007 to box office success, grossing $219 million worldwide, and acclaim from critics. A spin-off sequel, This Is 40, was released in 2012.

Long Walk Home

"Long Walk Home" is a song written and performed by Bruce Springsteen. It first appeared on his Sessions Band Tour of that year, in folk guise in the European leg of the tour in London for one performance only. Reworked with different and shorter lyrics, it was recorded by Springsteen and the E Street Band as a mid-tempo rocker and released on the 2007 Springsteen album Magic. This song was #8 on Rolling Stone's list of the 100 Best Songs of 2007. The song was released as a promo single.

Springsteen had said that it was a song about how he felt in the times of George W. Bush. "In that particular song a guy comes back to his town and recognizes nothing and is recognized by nothing," Springsteen told The New York Times' A. O. Scott. "The singer in 'Long Walk Home,' that's his experience. His world has changed. The things that he thought he knew, the people who he thought he knew, whose ideals he had something in common with, are like strangers. The world that he knew feels totally alien. I think that's what's happened in this country in the past six years." Although only released as a promotional single, the song was highlighted when a music video was made and released on 25 September 2007, the same day as the video for Magic first single "Radio Nowhere". The video featured real-life scenes from Springsteen's Jersey Shore interspersed with shots of Springsteen at Asbury Park Convention Hall and at Tony's diner on Main Street in Freehold.

Mads Mikkelsen

Mads Dittmann Mikkelsen, (Danish: [mas ˈmiɡl̩sn̩] (listen); born 22 November 1965) is a Danish actor. Originally a gymnast and dancer, he began acting in 1996. He rose to fame in Denmark as Tonny the drug dealer in the first two films of the Pusher film trilogy, and in his role as the brash yet sensitive policeman, Allan Fischer, in Peter Thorsboe's Danish television series Rejseholdet (Unit One) (2000–03).

Mikkelsen became more widely known for his role as Tristan in Jerry Bruckheimer's production King Arthur (2004), but achieved worldwide recognition for playing the main antagonist Le Chiffre in the twenty-first James Bond film, Casino Royale (2006). He has since become known for his roles as Igor Stravinsky in Jan Kounen's French film Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky (2008) and his Cannes Film Festival Best Actor Award-winning role as Lucas in the 2012 Danish film The Hunt. In 2012, he was voted the Danish American Society's Person of the Year. He starred in the television series Hannibal (2013–15) as Dr. Hannibal Lecter. In 2016, Mikkelsen portrayed Kaecilius in Marvel's film Doctor Strange and Galen Erso in Lucasfilm's Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. In 2018, he starred in Joe Penna's survival drama Arctic. Mikkelsen is set to star in Doug Liman's Chaos Walking and Jonas Åkerlund's Polar.

A. O. Scott of The New York Times remarked that in the Hollywood scene, Mikkelsen has "become a reliable character actor with an intriguing mug" but stated that on the domestic front "he is something else: a star, an axiom, a face of the resurgent Danish cinema".

Manohla Dargis

Manohla June Dargis (; born April 7, 1961) is an American film critic. She is one of the chief film critics for The New York Times, along with A. O. Scott. She is a five-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism.

Michael Phillips (critic)

Michael Phillips (born 1961) is an American film critic for the Chicago Tribune newspaper. Previously he was the drama critic of the Tribune; the Los Angeles Times; the St. Paul Pioneer Press; The San Diego Union-Tribune; and the Dallas Times Herald.

Phillips was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin and spent most of his early years in Racine. From 2006 through August 2008, he appeared frequently on At the Movies with Ebert & Roeper, first as one of numerous guest critics filling in for the late Roger Ebert while he was on medical leave, and becoming a semipermanent cohost with Richard Roeper in the months before Roeper and Ebert ended their association with the series. On August 5, 2009, Phillips was hired along with New York Times critic A.O. Scott to replace hosts Ben Lyons and Ben Mankiewicz.

More recently Phillips has introduced dozens of films as a guest host of Turner Classic Movies in 2011, 2013, 2016 and early 2017. He appears regularly on the Filmspotting podcast, and hosts a series of programs celebrating movie music titled "The Film Score" for WFMT-FM (98.7).

Rachel McAdams

Rachel Anne McAdams (born November 17, 1978) is a Canadian actress and activist. After graduating from a four-year theatre degree program at York University in 2001, she worked in Canadian television and film productions, such as the drama film Perfect Pie (2002), for which she received a Genie Award nomination, the comedy film My Name Is Tanino (2002), and the comedy series Slings and Arrows, for which she won a Gemini Award.

In 2002, she made her Hollywood film debut in the comedy The Hot Chick. McAdams rose to fame in 2004 with the comedy Mean Girls and the romantic drama The Notebook. In 2005, she starred in the romantic comedy Wedding Crashers, the psychological thriller Red Eye, and the comedy-drama The Family Stone. She was hailed by the media as Hollywood's new "it girl", and received a BAFTA Award nomination for Best Rising Star.

After a two-year break, McAdams starred in two limited-release films in 2008, the film noir Married Life and the road trip drama The Lucky Ones. She returned to prominence in 2009, by appearing in the political thriller State of Play, the science-fiction romantic drama The Time Traveler's Wife, and the mystery action-adventure film Sherlock Holmes. In 2010, McAdams appeared in her first star vehicle, the comedy Morning Glory. She then had starring roles in the films Midnight in Paris (2011), The Vow (2012), and About Time (2013). In 2015, her highest profile roles were in the second season of the HBO crime drama True Detective, and as journalist Sacha Pfeiffer in the drama Spotlight. For the latter, she was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. In 2016, she played Christine Palmer in the Marvel Cinematic Universe superhero film Doctor Strange. In 2018, she starred in the comedy Game Night and the romantic drama Disobedience.

Ryan Gosling

Ryan Thomas Gosling (born November 12, 1980) is a Canadian actor and musician. He began his career as a child star on the Disney Channel's The Mickey Mouse Club (1993–1995), and went on to appear in other family entertainment programs, including Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1995) and Goosebumps (1996). His first starring film role was as a Jewish neo-Nazi in The Believer (2001), and he went on to star in several independent films, including Murder by Numbers (2002), The Slaughter Rule (2002), and The United States of Leland (2003).

Gosling gained wider recognition in 2004 with a leading role in the commercially successful romance The Notebook. For playing a drug-addicted teacher in Half Nelson (2006), he was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor, and he next played a socially inept loner in Lars and the Real Girl (2007). After a three-year acting hiatus, Gosling starred in the marital drama Blue Valentine (2010). Gosling co-starred in three mainstream films in 2011, the romantic comedy Crazy, Stupid, Love, the political drama The Ides of March, and the crime thriller Drive. His directorial debut, Lost River, was released to poor reviews in 2014. Greater success came to Gosling when he starred in several critically acclaimed films, including the financial satire The Big Short (2015), and the romantic musical La La Land (2016), for which he won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy, and received a second Oscar nomination. Further acclaim followed with the science fiction Blade Runner 2049 (2017) and the biopic First Man (2018).

Gosling's band, Dead Man's Bones, released their self-titled debut album and toured North America in 2009. He is a co-owner of Tagine, a Moroccan restaurant in Beverly Hills, California. Gosling is a supporter of PETA, Invisible Children, and the Enough Project and has traveled to Chad, Uganda and eastern Congo to raise awareness about conflicts in the regions. Gosling has been involved in peace promotion efforts in Africa for over a decade. He has been in a relationship with actress Eva Mendes since 2011, and they have two daughters.

Slant Magazine

Slant Magazine is an American online publication that features reviews of movies, music, TV, DVDs, theater, and video games, as well as interviews with actors, directors, and musicians. The site covers various film festivals like the New York Film Festival.

The Believer (magazine)

The Believer is an American bimonthly magazine of interviews, essays, and reviews. Founded by the writers Heidi Julavits, Vendela Vida, and Ed Park in 2003, the magazine is a five-time finalist for the National Magazine Award, with contributors ranging from literary luminaries such as Hilton Als, Anne Carson, Nick Hornby, Susan Straight, and William T. Vollmann to emerging talents for whom the magazine has been a proving ground, including Eula Biss, Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Leslie Jamison, Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, Kent Russell, and Rivka Galchen.

Between 2003-2015, The Believer was published by McSweeney's, the independent press founded in 1998 by Dave Eggers. Eggers designed The Believer’s original design template. Park left The Believer in 2011, with Julavits and Vida continuing to serve as editors. In 2017, the magazine found a new home, moving from McSweeney's to the Beverly Rogers, Carol C. Harter Black Mountain Institute, an international literary center at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The Believer is currently edited by Joshua Wolf Shenk.

Tyson (2008 film)

Tyson is a 2008 documentary film about the life of former undisputed heavyweight world champion boxer Mike Tyson. It was directed by American filmmaker James Toback and produced by Nicholas Jarecki, Bob Yari, and NBA player Carmelo Anthony.The film was publicly screened for the first time at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival and won the Regard Knockout Award at the Un Certain Regard event.Tyson was released on April 24, 2009, distributed by Sony Classics.

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