A. Le Coq Arena

The A. Le Coq Arena (known as Lilleküla Stadium prior to sponsorship and during UEFA competitions) is a football stadium in Tallinn, Estonia. It is the home ground of football club Flora and the Estonia national football team. With a capacity of 14,405, it is the largest football stadium in Estonia.

A. Le Coq Arena
A. Le Coq Arena
Former namesFC Flora Lilleküla Stadium
LocationAsula 4c, Kesklinn, Tallinn, Estonia
Coordinates59°25′16.65″N 24°43′55.38″E / 59.4212917°N 24.7320500°ECoordinates: 59°25′16.65″N 24°43′55.38″E / 59.4212917°N 24.7320500°E
OwnerEstonian Football Association
OperatorEstonian Football Association
Capacity14,405[1]
Field size105 by 68 metres (344 by 223 ft)[2]
Construction
Broke ground2000
Opened2 June 2001
Expanded2016–2018
Construction cost131 million EEK (2002)
ArchitectHaldo Oravas
Tenants
Flora (2001–present)
FCI Levadia (2019–present)
Estonia national football team (2001–present)

History

In July 1998, Flora submitted a planning application to Tallinn City Council, requesting permission to build a new stadium on wasteland between railway lines in Kitseküla, close to the border with neighbouring Lilleküla.[3] Receiving the council's approval, Flora signed a 99-year lease on the estate and construction began in October 2000.[4] The stadium was designed by Haldo Oravas.

The stadium was officially opened 2 June 2001, with a 2002 FIFA World Cup qualification match between Estonia and the Netherlands. The match saw Estonia's Andres Oper become the first player to score at the new stadium when he scored in the 65th minute, with the full-time result being a 2–4 loss.

Samba boys kick off the match in Tallinn
A. Le Coq Arena during Estonia friendly against Brazil in 2009

In January 2002, A. Le Coq bought naming rights for the stadium and Lilleküla Stadium was renamed A. Le Coq Arena.

AEROSMITH - WORLD TOUR 2007- A.Le Coq ARENA, Tallinn
Aerosmith concert held at A. Le Coq Arena in 2007

Aside from football and other sporting events, several concerts have been held at A. Le Coq Arena, such as Lenny Kravitz in 2005 and Aerosmith in 2007.[1]

During the 2012 UEFA European Under-19 Championship, the stadium hosted 6 out of 15 tournament matches, including the final.

In 2012, Flora completed the transfer ownership of the Lilleküla Football Complex, including A. Le Coq Arena, to the Estonian Football Association.

In September 2016, it was announced that the stadium would host the 2018 UEFA Super Cup. In preparation for the match, the stadium's capacity was increased from 10,000 to 15,000.[5] The 2018 UEFA Super Cup match between the 2017–18 UEFA Champions League winners Real Madrid and the 2017–18 UEFA Europa League winners Atlético Madrid was held on 15 August 2018, with Atlético Madrid winning 4–2 in extra time.[6]

Lilleküla Football Complex

A. Le Coq Arena is the centrepiece of the Lilleküla Football Complex, which also includes two grass surface pitches, two artificial turf pitches and an indoor hall.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c "A. Le Coq Arena" (in Estonian). Estonian Football Association. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  2. ^ "A. Le Coq Arena staadion". Eesti spordiregister (in Estonian). Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  3. ^ "Prügimäest saab staadion" [Waste ground will become a stadium]. Postimees (in Estonian). 25 July 1998.
  4. ^ "FC Flora rajab Lillekülasse jalgpallistaadioni" [FC Flora will build a football stadium in Lilleküla]. Eesti Päevaleht (in Estonian). 19 October 2000.
  5. ^ "Tallinn to stage 2018 UEFA Super Cup". UEFA.com. 8 August 2017.
  6. ^ "Atlético win UEFA Super Cup in extra time". UEFA.com. 16 August 2018.

External links

Preceded by
Philip II Arena
Skopje
UEFA Super Cup
Host Venue

2018
Succeeded by
Vodafone Park
Istanbul
2007 in Estonian football

The 2007 season is the 16th competitive football season in Estonia.

2008 in Estonian football

The 2008 season is the 17th competitive football season in Estonia.

2009 in Estonian football

The 2009 season is the 18th competitive football season in Estonia.

2017 Estonian Football Winter Tournament

The 2017 Estonian Football Winter Tournament or the 2017 EJL Jalgpallihalli Turniir is the fourth edition of the annual tournament in Estonia. This tournament is divided into five groups of 6 teams.

2018 Estonian Football Winter Tournament

The 2018 Estonian Football Winter Tournament or the 2018 EJL Jalgpallihalli Turniir is the fifth edition of the annual tournament in Estonia. This tournament is divided into five groups of 6 teams.

2018 UEFA Super Cup

The 2018 UEFA Super Cup was the 43rd edition of the UEFA Super Cup, an annual football match organised by UEFA and contested by the reigning champions of the two main European club competitions, the UEFA Champions League and the UEFA Europa League. The match featured two Spanish sides, Real Madrid, the winners of the 2017–18 UEFA Champions League and the defending champions having won the previous two editions, and Atlético Madrid, the winners of the 2017–18 UEFA Europa League. It was played at the A. Le Coq Arena in Tallinn, Estonia, on 15 August 2018, and was the first European club final held in Estonia.In March 2018, UEFA announced that a fourth substitution would be allowed in extra time and that the number of substitutes had been increased from 7 to 12. The kick-off time was also changed from 20:45 CEST to 21:00 CEST.Atlético Madrid won the match 4–2 after extra time for their third UEFA Super Cup title.

Estonia national football team

The Estonia national football team (Estonian: Eesti jalgpallikoondis) represents Estonia in international football matches and is controlled by the Estonian Football Association, the governing body for football in Estonia. Estonia's home ground is A. Le Coq Arena in Tallinn.

Estonia's first match was held against Finland in 1920, being a 6–0 defeat. The team participated in the 1924 Olympic Games tournament, their only participation. In 1940, Estonia was occupied by the Soviet Union and did not regain independence (and the possibility of a national football team) until 1991. Estonia's first FIFA recognised match as an independent nation after the break-up of the Soviet Union, was against Slovenia on 3 June 1992, a 1–1 draw in the Estonian capital city of Tallinn.

Estonia has never qualified for the FIFA World Cup or UEFA European Championship. The team has however reached the UEFA Euro 2012 qualifying play-offs, by finishing second in their qualifying group, before being drawn up against Ireland for a play-off tie, making 2011 the Annus mirabilis of Estonian football.

Estonia has also participated in the local sub-regional Baltic Cup championship, which takes place every two years between the countries of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. Estonia has won the Baltic Cup tournament three times—most recently in 1938—which is the least of all three Baltic states.

The record for the most international caps by an international is held by Martin Reim with 157, who held the European record in 2009 until November of that year. The record for most goals is held by Andres Oper with 38.

Estonia national football team 2005

The 2005 season was the 14th full year of competitive football in the Baltic country as an independent nation. The Estonia national football team played a total number of twelve international matches in 2005, and did not qualify for the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany.

Estonia national football team 2008

The 2008 season was the seventeenth full year of competitive football in the Baltic country as an independent nation. The Estonia national football team played a total number of fifteen matches (including one unofficial) in 2008 and started in the qualifying tournament for the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa.

Estonia national football team 2009

The 2009 season was the 18th full year of competitive football in the Baltic country as an independent nation. The Estonia national football team played a total number of thirteen matches in 2009, and did not qualify for the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa.

Estonia national football team results

This is a list of the Estonia national football team results from 2013 to the present day.

Estonia national under-19 football team

The Estonia national under-19 football team represents Estonia in international under-19 football and is controlled by the Estonian Football Association (Eesti Jalgpalli Liit), the governing body for football in Estonia. The team's home ground is the A. Le Coq Arena in Tallinn, and the current manager is Argo Arbeiter.

Estonia qualified as hosts to the 2012 UEFA European Under-19 Championship, making it Estonia's first appearance in a major tournament and the first major football tournament to be held in the country. The team failed to get past the group stage, losing all three matches against Portugal, Greece and Spain.

Estonia national under-23 football team

The Estonia national under-23 football team represents Estonia in the International Challenge Trophy competition and is controlled by the Estonian Football Association, the governing body for football in Estonia.

The team's home ground is the A. Le Coq Arena in Tallinn.

Estonian Small Cup

The Estonian Small Cup is a knock-out competition for Estonian amateur teams, which play in the 4th or lower level. The first competition was won by Kohtla-Järve JK Alko in 2005 and the latest title was given to Saue JK. Finals are held in Tallinn, A. Le Coq Arena since 2007.

Estonian Women's Cup

The Estonian Women's Cup (Estonian: Eesti naiste karikavõistlused) is the national women's football cup competition in Estonia. It was first held in 2007. The record for the most wins is held by Pärnu with six victories.

The cup is currently held by Flora.

FCI Levadia Tallinn

FCI Levadia Tallinn, commonly known as FCI Levadia, or simply as Levadia, is a professional football club based in Tallinn, Estonia, that competes in the Meistriliiga, the top flight of Estonian football. The club's home ground is A. Le Coq Arena.

Founded as Levadia in Maardu in 1998, the club moved to Tallinn in 2004. The club has played in the Meistriliiga since the 1999 season and have never been relegated from the Estonian top division. Levadia have won 9 Meistriliiga titles, a record 9 Estonian Cups and 7 Estonian Supercups. In 2017, Levadia's first team merged with FCI Tallinn, and became FCI Levadia.

FC Flora

FC Flora, commonly known as Flora Tallinn, or simply as Flora, is a professional football club based in Tallinn, Estonia, that competes in the Meistriliiga, the top flight of Estonian football. The club's home ground is A. Le Coq Arena.

Formed in 1990, Flora were founding members of the Meistriliiga, and are one of two clubs which have never been relegated from the Estonian top division, along with Narva Trans. Flora have won more trophies than any other club in Estonian football, with a record 11 Meistriliiga titles, seven Estonian Cups and a record nine Estonian Supercups.

Kadriorg Stadium

The Kadriorg Stadium (Estonian: Kadrioru staadion) is a multi-purpose stadium in Tallinn, Estonia. It is currently used mostly for football matches and is the home stadium of FC Levadia Tallinn. The stadium holds 5,000 and was built in 1926. The Kadriorg Stadium is located about 2 km east of the city centre in the subdistrict of Kadriorg near the Kadriorg Palace. The address of the stadium is Roheline aas 24, 10150 Tallinn.

Before 2001 when the A. Le Coq Arena was built, Kadriorg also was the home ground for the Estonia national football team.

Kitseküla

Kitseküla (Estonian for "Goat Village") is a subdistrict (asum) of the district of Kesklinn (Midtown) in Tallinn, the capital of Estonia. It has a population of 4,053 (As of 1 January 2015).Kitseküla is situated between two railway corridors so there are several stations surrounding it: "Tallinn-Väike" on the Tallinn–Pärnu/Viljandi line; "Lilleküla", "Tondi" and "Järve" on Tallinn–Paldiski/Riisipere line and "Kitseküla" on Tallinn–Aegviidu line. All these stations are served by Elron trains.

A. Le Coq Arena (Lilleküla Stadium), the home ground of the Estonia national football team and FC Flora football club, is located in the northwestern corner of Kitseküla, between the diverging railway lines.

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