94th United States Congress

The Ninety-fourth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1975, to January 3, 1977, during the administration of U.S. President Gerald Ford.

This is the first congress for the currently (as of the 115th) longest serving senator, Patrick Leahy of Vermont.

The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Nineteenth Census of the United States in 1970. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

94th United States Congress
93rd ←
→ 95th
USCapitol
January 3, 1975 – January 3, 1977
Senate PresidentNelson Rockefeller (R)
Senate President pro temJames Eastland (D)
House SpeakerCarl Albert (D)
Members100 senators
435 members of the House
5 non-voting delegates
Senate MajorityDemocratic
House MajorityDemocratic
Sessions
1st: January 14, 1975 – December 19, 1975
2nd: January 19, 1976 – October 1, 1976

Major events

1975 State of the Union Address
President Gerald Ford with Vice President Nelson Rockefeller and House Speaker Carl Albert during the 1975 State of the Union Address, January 15, 1975

Special or select committees

  • Church Committee (Senate Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations with Respect to Intelligence Activities): July 27, 1975 – May 19, 1976; Replaced by Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
  • Joint Committee on Arrangements for the Bicentennial: September 5, 1975 - October 1, 1976

Major legislation

Party summary

Senate

94thUSSenate
Final Senate Membership
     61 Democrats      42 Republicans
     1 Independent      1 Conservative

Membership changed with two resignations and a disputed election.

Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Independent Conservative (N.Y.) Republican Vacant
End of previous Congress 57 1 1 40 100 0
Begin 60 1 1 37 99 1
End 61 100 0
Final voting share 62% 38%
Beginning of the next Congress 61 1 0 38 100 0

House of Representatives

Total: 435

Leadership

94th senate
Makeup of the U.S. Senate at the start of the 94th Congress, color-coded by party. Note: The orange stripes in New York and the gray stripes in Virginia denote Conservative Sen. James L. Buckley and Independent Sen. Harry F. Byrd Jr., respectively.

Senate

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

House of Representatives

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

Caucuses

Members

Senate

Senators are popularly elected statewide every two years, with one-third beginning new six-year terms with each Congress, In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term ended with this Congress, facing re-election in 1976; Class 2 meant their term began in the last Congress, facing re-election in 1978; and Class 3 meant their term began in this Congress, facing re-election in 1980.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

94 us house membership
House seats by party holding plurality in state
  80+% to 100% Republican
  80+% to 100% Democratic
  60+% to 80% Republican
  60+% to 80% Democratic
  Up to 60% Republican
  Up to 60% Democratic

House of Representatives

Many of the congressional districts are linked to articles describing the district itself. Since the boundaries of the districts have changed often and substantially, the linked article may only describe the district as it exists today, and not as it was at the time of this Congress.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

Non-voting members

Changes in Membership

The count below reflects changes from the beginning of the first session of this Congress.

Senate

  • Replacements: 8
  • Deaths: 1
  • Resignations: 6
  • Vacancy: 0

Total seats with changes: 8

State
(class)
Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation
New Hampshire
(3)
Vacant Disputed election.
Interim senator appointed August 8, 1975.
Norris Cotton
(R)
August 8, 1975
New Hampshire
(3)
Norris Cotton
(R)
Interim appointee lost election.
Successor elected September 16, 1975.
John A. Durkin
(D)
September 18, 1975
Michigan
(1)
Philip Hart
(D)
Died December 26, 1976.
Successor appointed December 27, 1976 to finish the term, having already been elected to the next term.
Donald W. Riegle Jr.
(D)
December 27, 1976
Missouri
(1)
Stuart Symington
(D)
Resigned December 27, 1976 to give successor preferential seniority.
Successor appointed December 27, 1976 to finish the term, having already been elected to the next term.
John Danforth
(R)
December 27, 1976
Nebraska
(1)
Roman Hruska
(R)
Resigned December 27, 1976 to give successor preferential seniority.
Successor appointed December 28, 1976 to finish the term, having already been elected to the next term.
Edward Zorinsky
(D)
December 28, 1976
Ohio
(1)
Robert Taft Jr.
(R)
Resigned December 28, 1976 to give successor preferential seniority.
Successor appointed December 28, 1976 to finish the term, having already been elected to the next term.
Howard Metzenbaum
(D)
December 29, 1976
Rhode Island
(1)
John O. Pastore
(D)
Resigned December 28, 1976 to give successor preferential seniority.
Successor appointed December 29, 1976 to finish the term, having already been elected to the next term.
John Chafee
(R)
December 29, 1976
Minnesota
(2)
Walter Mondale
(DFL)
Resigned December 30, 1976, after being elected Vice-President of the United States.
Interim Senator appointed December 30, 1976.
Wendell Anderson
(DFL)
December 30, 1976
California
(1)
John V. Tunney
(D)
Resigned January 1, 1977 to give successor preferential seniority.
Successor appointed January 2, 1977 to finish the term, having already been elected to the next term.
S. I. Hayakawa
(R)
January 2, 1977

House of Representatives

  • replacements: 3
  • deaths: 2
  • resignations: 2
  • contested election:
  • Total seats with changes: 4
District Vacator Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation
Oklahoma 5th John Jarman (D) Changed parties John Jarman (R) January 23, 1975
Illinois 5th John C. Kluczynski (D) Died January 26, 1975 John G. Fary (D) July 8, 1975
California 37th Jerry Pettis (R) Died February 14, 1975 Shirley N. Pettis (R) April 29, 1975
Tennessee 5th Richard Fulton (D) Resigned August 14, 1975, after being elected Mayor of Nashville Clifford Allen (D) November 25, 1975
New York 39th James F. Hastings (R) Resigned January 20, 1976 Stan Lundine (D) March 2, 1976
Texas 22nd Robert R. Casey (D) Resigned January 22, 1976, after being appointed a commissioner on the Federal Maritime Commission Ron Paul (R) April 3, 1976
Texas 1st Wright Patman (D) Died March 7, 1976 Sam B. Hall (D) June 19, 1976
Pennsylvania 1st William A. Barrett (D) Died April 12, 1976 Ozzie Myers (D) November 2, 1976
Massachusetts 7th Torbert Macdonald (D) Died May 21, 1976 Ed Markey (D) November 2, 1976
Missouri 6th Jerry Litton (D) Died August 3, 1976 Tom Coleman (R) November 2, 1976
Ohio 18th Wayne Hays (D) Resigned September 1, 1976, due to the Elizabeth Ray sex scandal Vacant Not filled this term
Michigan 7th Donald W. Riegle Jr. (D) Resigned December 30, 1976, after being appointed to the U.S. Senate

Committees

Lists of committees and their party leaders, for members (House and Senate) of the committees and their assignments, go into the Official Congressional Directory at the bottom of the article and click on the link (2 links), in the directory after the pages of terms of service, you will see the committees of the Senate, House (Standing with Subcommittees, Select and Special) and Joint and after the committee pages, you will see the House/Senate committee assignments in the directory, on the committees section of the House and Senate in the Official Congressional Directory, the committee's members on the first row on the left side shows the chairman of the committee and on the right side shows the ranking member of the committee.

Senate

  • Aging (Special) (Chair: Frank Church)
  • Aeronautical and Space Sciences (Chair: Frank Moss)
    • Aerospace Technology and National Needs (Ad Hoc)
    • the Upper Atmosphere (Ad Hoc)
  • Agriculture and Forestry (Chair: Herman Talmadge)
    • Environment, Soil Conservation and Forestry
    • Agricultural Credit and Rural Electrification
    • Agricultural Production, Marketing and Stabilization of Prices
    • Rural Development
    • Foreign Agricultural Policy
  • Appropriations (Chair: John Little McClellan)
    • Agriculture and Related Agencies
    • Defense
    • District of Columbia
    • Foreign Operations
    • HUD-Independent Agencies
    • Interior
    • Labor, Health, Education and Welfare
    • Legislative
    • Military Construction
    • Public Works
    • State, Justice, Commerce and the Judiciary
    • Transportation
    • Treasury, Postal Service and General Government
  • Armed Services (Chair: John C. Stennis)
    • Intelligence
    • Preparedness Investigating
    • National Stockfile and Naval Petroleum Reserves
    • Military Construction Authorization
    • Arms Control
    • Tactical Air Power
    • Research and Development
    • General Legislation
    • Manpower and Personnel
  • Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs (Chair: William Proxmire)
    • Oversight
    • Housing and Urban Affairs
    • Financial Institutions
    • Securities
    • International Finance
    • Production and Stabilization
    • Consumer Affairs
    • Small Business
  • Budget (Chair: Edmund Muskie)
  • Commerce (Chair: Warren Magnuson)
    • Aviation
    • Communications
    • Consumer
    • Environment
    • Foreign Commerce and Tourism
    • Merchant Marine
    • Oceans and Atmosphere
    • Surface Transportation
    • National Ocean Policy Study
    • Science, Technology and Commerce
    • Oil and Natural Gas Production and Distribution
    • To Study Textile Industry
    • the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway
    • Freight Car Shortage
  • District of Columbia
  • Finance (Chair: Russell B. Long)
    • Health
    • Foundations
    • International Trade
    • International Finance and Resources
    • Private Pension Plans
    • Social Security Financing
    • Energy
    • Financial Markets
    • Revenue Markets
    • Administration of the Internal Revenue Code
    • Supplemental Security Income
  • Foreign Relations (Chair: John Sparkman)
    • European Affairs
    • Far Eastern Affairs
    • Multinational Corporations
    • Arms Control and Security Agreements
    • Oceans and International Environment
    • Western Hemisphere Affairs
    • Near Eastern and South Asian Affairs
    • Foreign Assistance and Economic Policy
    • African Affairs
  • Government Operations (Chair: Abraham A. Ribicoff)
    • Investigations
    • Intergovernmental Relations
    • Reports, Accounting and Management
    • Overnight Procedures
    • Federal Spending Practices, Efficiency and Open Government
  • Interior and Insular Affairs (Chair: Henry M. Jackson)
    • Energy Research and Water Resources
    • Environment and Land Resources
    • Indian Affairs
    • Minerals, Materials and Fuels
    • Parks and Recreation
    • Legislative Oversight
    • Integrated Oil Operations (Special)
  • Judiciary (Chair: James Eastland)
    • Administrative Practice and Procedure
    • Antitrust and Monopoly
    • Constitutional Amendments
    • Constitutional Rights
    • Criminal Laws and Procedures
    • FBI Oversight
    • Federal Charters, Holidays and Celebrations
    • Immigration and Naturalization
    • Improvements in Judicial Machinery
    • Internal Security
    • Juvenile Delinquency
    • Patents, Trademarks and Copyrights
    • Penitentiaries
    • Rufugees and Escapees
    • Revision of Codification
    • Separation of Powers
  • Labor and Public Welfare (Chair: Harrison A. Williams)
    • Labor
    • The Handicapped
    • Education
    • Health
    • Employment, Poverty and Migratory Lands
    • Children and Youth
    • Aging
    • Alcoholism and Narcotics
    • Arts and Humanities
    • National Science Foundation
    • Human Resources
  • Nutrition and Human Needs (Select) (Chair: George McGovern)
  • Post Office and Civil Service
    • Ex-Officio Members of Postal Appropriations
    • Civil Service Policies and Practices
    • Compensation and Employment Benefits
    • Postal Operations
    • Census and Statistics
  • National Emergencies and Delegated Emergency Powers (Special)
  • Public Works (Chair: Jennings Randolph)
    • Environmental Pollution
    • Panel on Environmental Science and Technology
    • Economic Development
    • Water Resources
    • Transportation
    • Disaster Relief
    • Buildings and Grounds
  • Rules and Administration (Chair: Howard Cannon)
    • Standing Rules of the Senate
    • Privileges and Elections
    • Printing
    • Library
    • Smithsonian Institution
    • Restaurant
    • Computer Services
  • Intelligence Activities (Select) (Chair: Daniel Inouye)
  • Senate Committee System (Special)
  • Small Business (Select) (Chair: Gaylord Nelson)
  • Standards and Conduct (Select) (Chair: Howard Cannon)
  • To Study Governmental Operations With Respect to Intelligence Activities (Select)
  • Termination of the National Emergency (Special)
  • Veterans' Affairs (Chair: Vance Hartke)
    • Compensation and Pensions
    • Health and Hospitals
    • Housing and Insurance
    • Readjustment, Education and Employment
    • Cemeteries and Burial Benefits
  • Whole

House of Representatives

  • Aging (Select) (Chair: William J. Randall)
  • Agriculture (Chair: Tom Foley)
    • Livestock and Grains
    • Tobacco
    • Cotton
    • Dairy and Poultry
    • Family Farms and Rural Development
  • Appropriations (Chair: George H. Mahon)
    • Agriculture and Related Agencies
    • Defense
    • District of Columbia
    • Foreign Operations
    • HUD-Independent Agencies
    • Interior
    • Labor-Health, Education and Welfare
    • Legislative
    • Military Construction
    • Public Works
    • State, Justice, Commerce and Judiciary
    • Transportation
    • Treasury, Postal Service and General Government
  • Armed Services (Chair: Charles Melvin Price)
    • Research and Development
    • Seapower, Strategic and Critical Materials
    • Military Compensation
    • Military Installations and Facilities
    • Military Personnel
    • Investigations
    • Intelligence
  • Banking and Currency (Chair: Henry S. Reuss)
    • Domestic Monetary Policy
    • Housing and Community and Development
    • Economic Stabilization
    • Consumer Affairs
    • International Development Institutions and Finance
    • Financial Institutions Supervision, Regulation and Insurance
    • International Trade, Investment and Monetary Policy
    • General Oversight and Renegotiation
    • Historic Preservation and Coinage
  • Budget (Chair: Brock Adams)
  • Crime (Select)
  • District of Columbia (Chair: Charles Diggs)
    • Commerce, Housing and Transportation
    • Education, Labor and Social Services
    • Government Operations
    • Judiciary
    • Fiscal Affairs
    • The Bicentennial, The Environment and the International Community
  • Education and Labor (Chair: Carl D. Perkins)
    • Elementary, Secondary and Vocational Education
    • Labor-Management Relations
    • Labor Standards
    • Manpower, Compensation, Health and Safety
    • Select Education
    • Postsecondary Education
    • Equal Opportunities
    • Agricultural Labor
  • Government Operations (Chair: Jack Brooks
    • Legislation and National Security
    • Intergovernmental Relations and Human Resources
    • Conservation, Energy and Natural Resources
    • Government Activities and Transportation
    • Commerce, Consumer and Monetary Affairs
    • Manpower and Housing
    • Government Information and Individual Rights
  • House Administration (Chair: Wayne Hays, then Frank Thompson)
    • Accounts
    • Elections
    • Library and Memorials
    • Printing
    • Electrical and Mechanical Office Equipment
    • Personnel and Police
    • Contracts
    • Parking
    • Paper Conservation
    • Computer (Ad Hoc)
    • Restaurant (Ad Hoc)
  • House Beauty Shop (Select)
  • Intelligence (Select) (Chair: Lucien N. Nedzi, then Otis G. Pike)
  • Insular Affairs (Chair: James A. Haley)
    • National Parks and Recreation
    • Water and Power Resources
    • Energy and the Environment
    • Territorial and Insular Affairs
    • Mines and Mining
    • Indian Affairs
    • Public Lands
  • International Relations (Chair: Thomas E. Morgan)
  • Interstate and Foreign Commerce (Chair: Harley Orrin Staggers)
    • Communications
    • Oversight and Investigations
    • Energy and Power
    • Health and the Environment
    • Consumer Protection and Finance
    • Transportation and Commerce
  • Judiciary (Chair: Peter W. Rodino)
    • United States House Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration-->
    • Courts, Civil Liberties and the Administration of Justice
    • Monopolies and Commercial Law
    • Administrative Law and Governmental Relations
    • Civil and Constitutional Rights
    • Crime
    • Criminal Justice
  • Merchant Marine and Fisheries (Chair: Leonor Sullivan)
    • Merchant Marine
    • Fisheries, Wildlife Conservation and the Environment
    • Coast Guard and Navigation
    • Oceangraphy
    • Panama Canal
  • Missing Persons in Southeast Asia (Select)
  • Modernization of House Gallery Facilities (Special)
  • Outer Continental Shelf (Ad Hoc/Select)
  • Post Office and Civil Service
    • Manpower and Civil Service
    • Postal Service
    • Postal Facilities, Mail and Labor Management
    • Retirement and Employee Benefits
    • Employee Political Rights and Intergovernmental Programs
    • Census and Population
  • Public Works and Transportation (Chair: Robert E. Jones Jr.)
    • Aviation
    • Economic Development
    • Investigations and Review
    • Public Buildings and Grounds
    • Surface Transportation
    • Water Resources
  • Regulate Parking (Select)
  • Rules (Chair: Ray Madden)
  • Science and Technology (Chair: Olin E. Teague)
    • Energy Research, Development and Demonstration (Fossil Fuels)
    • Space Science and Applications
    • Science, Research and Technology
    • Domestic and International Scientific Planning and Analysis
    • Energy Research, Development and Demonstration
    • Environment and the Atmosphere
    • Aviation and Transportation R&D
  • Small Business
    • Energy and Environment
    • Government Procurement and International Trade
    • Activities of Regulatory Agencies
    • SBA and SBIC Legislation
    • SBA Oversight and Minority Enterprise
    • Commodities and Services
    • Antitrust, the Robinson-Patman Act and Related Matters (Ad Hoc)
  • Standards of Official Conduct
  • Veterans' Affairs (Chair: Ray Roberts)
    • Compensation, Pension and Insurance
    • Education and Training
    • Hospitals
    • Housing
    • Cemeteries and Burial Benefits
  • Ways and Means (Chair: Al Ullman)
  • Whole

Joint committees

  • Arrangements for the Commemoration of the Bicentennial of the United States of America
  • Atomic Energy
  • Congressional Operations
  • Defense Productions
  • Economic
  • Internal Revenue Taxation
  • Library
  • Printing

Employees and legislative agency directors

Legislative branch agency directors

Senate

House of Representatives

See also

References

  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.

External links

1974 United States House of Representatives election in the District of Columbia

The 1974 congressional election for the Delegate from the District of Columbia was held on November 4, 1974. The winner of the race was Walter E. Fauntroy (D), who won his second re-election. Independent candidate James G. Banks surprised many by taking second place, ahead of William R. Phillips (R) and Statehood Party candidate Anton V. Wood. All elected members would serve in 94th United States Congress.

The non-voting delegate to the United States House of Representatives from the District of Columbia is elected for two-year terms, as are all other Representatives and Delegates minus the Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico, who is elected to a four-year term.

1974 United States elections

The 1974 United States elections were held on November 5, and elected the members of the 94th United States Congress. The elections occurred 3 months into Republican President Gerald Ford's term. Ford had become president on August 9, 1974, upon the resignation of his predecessor, Richard Nixon, in the wake of the Watergate scandal. He granted Nixon a pardon on September 8. In addition, an energy crisis hit the country at this time, resulting in soaring inflation. These circumstances, along with the tendency for the president's party to struggle in mid-term elections, hurt the Republicans, and they lost seats in both houses of Congress. Many of the newly elected Democrats were liberal northerners (known as Watergate Babies), and the influx of liberals moved power away from the conservative southern Democrats who held most committee chairs in both houses.

1974 and 1975 United States Senate elections in New Hampshire

The 1974 and 1975 Elections for United States Senator in New Hampshire, first held November 5, 1974 and held again September 16, 1975, were part of the longest contested election for the U.S. Congress in United States history.

1975 State of the Union Address

The 1975 State of the Union address was given by President Gerald Ford to a joint session of the 94th United States Congress on January 15, 1975. The speech was the first State of the Union address of President Ford's tenure as president.

The president discussed the national debt, taxes, the federal budget and the energy crisis. The speech lasted 41:00 and consisted of 4,126 words. The address was broadcast live on radio and television.

The Democratic Party response was delivered by Senator Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota and the Speaker of the House Carl Albert of Oklahoma.

1976 State of the Union Address

The 1976 State of the Union address was given by President Gerald R. Ford to a joint session of the 94th United States Congress on Monday, January 19, 1976.

The speech lasted 50 minutes and 38 seconds. and contained 4948 words.

Arms Export Control Act

The Arms Export Control Act of 1976 (Title II of Pub.L. 94–329, 90 Stat. 729, enacted June 30, 1976, codified at 22 U.S.C. ch. 39) gives the President of the United States the authority to control the import and export of defense articles and defense services. The H.R. 13680 legislation was passed by the 94th Congressional session and enacted into law by the 38th President of the United States Gerald R. Ford on June 30, 1976.The Act of Congress requires international governments receiving weapons from the United States to use the armaments for legitimate self-defense. Consideration is given as to whether the exports "would contribute to an arms race, aid in the development of weapons of mass destruction, support international terrorism, increase the possibility of outbreak or escalation of conflict, or prejudice the development of bilateral or multilateral arms control or nonproliferation agreements or other arrangements." The Act also places certain restrictions on American arms traders and manufacturers, prohibiting them from the sale of certain sensitive technologies to certain parties and requiring thorough documentation of such trades to trusted parties.

When the President is aware of the possibility of violations of the AECA, the law requires a report to Congress on the potential violations.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) conducts an industry outreach program called the Project Shield America to prevent foreign adversaries, terrorists, and criminal networks from obtaining U.S. munitions and strategic technology.

Developmentally Disabled Assistance and Bill of Rights Act

The Developmentally Disabled Assistance and Bill of Rights Act is a US law providing federal funds to Councils on Developmental Disabilities, Protection and Advocacy Systems, as well as University Centers. The law defined the relatively new term "developmental disability" to include specific conditions that originate prior to age 18, are expected to continue indefinitely, and that constitute a substantial handicap. These conditions included mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, autism, and dyslexia.

Education for All Handicapped Children Act

The Education for All Handicapped Children Act (sometimes referred to using the acronyms EAHCA or EHA, or Public Law (PL) 94-142) was enacted by the United States Congress in 1975. This act required all public schools accepting federal funds to provide equal access to education and one free meal a day for children with physical and mental disabilities. Public schools were required to evaluate children with disabilities and create an educational plan with parent input that would emulate as closely as possible the educational experience of non-disabled students. The act was an amendment to Part B of the Education of the Handicapped Act enacted in 1966.The act also required that school districts provide administrative procedures so that parents of disabled children could dispute decisions made about their children’s education. Once the administrative efforts were exhausted, parents were then authorized to seek judicial review of the administration’s decision. Prior to the enactment of EHA, parents could take their disputes straight to the judiciary under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The mandatory system of dispute resolution created by EHA was an effort to alleviate the financial burden created by litigation pursuant to the Rehabilitation Act.

PL 94-142 also contains a provision that disabled students should be placed in the least restrictive environment-one that allows the maximum possible opportunity to interact with non-impaired students. Separate schooling may only occur when the nature or severity of the disability is such that instructional goals cannot be achieved in the regular classroom. Finally, the law contains a due process clause that guarantees an impartial hearing to resolve conflicts between the parents of disabled children to the school system.

The law was passed to meet four huge goals:

To ensure that special education services are available to children who need them

To guarantee that decisions about services to students with disabilities are fair and appropriate

To establish specific management and auditing requirements for special education

To provide federal funds to help the states educate students with disabilitiesEHA was revised and renamed as Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in 1990 for improvement of special education and inclusive education.

Energy Policy and Conservation Act

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA) (Pub.L. 94–163, 89 Stat. 871, enacted December 22, 1975) is a United States Act of Congress that responded to the 1973 oil crisis by creating a comprehensive approach to federal energy policy. The primary goals of EPCA are to increase energy production and supply, reduce energy demand, provide energy efficiency, and give the executive branch additional powers to respond to disruptions in energy supply. Most notably, EPCA established the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, the Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products, and Corporate Average Fuel Economy regulations.

Government in the Sunshine Act

The Government in the Sunshine Act (Pub.L. 94–409, 90 Stat. 1241, enacted September 13, 1976, 5 U.S.C. § 552b) is a U.S. law passed in 1976 that affects the operations of the federal government, Congress, federal commissions, and other legally constituted federal bodies. It is one of a number of Freedom of Information Acts, intended to create greater transparency in government.

Hart–Scott–Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act

The Hart–Scott–Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-435, known commonly as the HSR Act) is a set of amendments to the antitrust laws of the United States, principally the Clayton Antitrust Act. The HSR Act was signed into law by president Gerald R. Ford on September 30, 1976. The context in which the HSR Act is usually cited is 15 U.S.C. § 18a, title II of the original law. The HSR Act is named after senators Philip A. Hart and Hugh D. Scott, Jr. and representative Peter W. Rodino.

The HSR Act provides that parties must not complete certain mergers, acquisitions or transfers of securities or assets, including grants of executive compensation, until they have made a detailed filing with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission and Department of Justice and waited for those agencies to determine that the transaction will not adversely affect U.S. commerce under the antitrust laws. While parties can carry out due diligence and plan for post-merger integration, they may not take any steps to integrate operations, such as an acquiring party obtaining operational control of the acquired party.

Indochina Migration and Refugee Assistance Act

The Indochina Migration and Refugee Assistance Act, passed on May 23, 1975, under President Gerald Ford, was a response to the Fall of Saigon and the end of the Vietnam War. Under this act, approximately 130,000 refugees from South Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia were allowed to enter the United States under a special status, and the act allotted for special relocation aid and financial assistance.

Japan-United States Friendship Act of 1975

Japan-United States Friendship Act of 1975 seek to establish a cooperative peacetime friendship through the exchange of artistic and cultural endowments. The United States statute is a declaration stating a Japan-United States friendship will provide a global model partnership leading to future peace, prosperity, and security in Asia. The Act of Congress acknowledges the 1971 Okinawa Reversion Agreement relinquishing United States authority of the Okinawa Prefecture better known as the Daitō Islands and Ryukyu Islands. The Act created the Japan-United States Friendship Trust Fund and Japan-United States Friendship Commission developing programs for the artistic and cultural exchanges between America and Japan.

The S. 824 legislation was passed by the 94th United States Congressional session and enacted into law by the 38th President of the United States Gerald Ford on October 20, 1975.

John J. LaFalce

John Joseph LaFalce (born October 6, 1939) is a former congressman from the state of New York; he served from 1975 to 2003.

LaFalce was first elected to the 94th United States Congress in 1974 and re-elected to each succeeding Congress through the 107th, serving his Western New York congressional district for 28 years, from 1975 to 2003. He served as Chairman of the House Small Business Committee from 1987 to 1995, and as Ranking Democrat on the House Financial Services Committee from 1999 to 2003. He declined to seek re-election to the 108th Congress.

List of United States Senators in the 94th Congress by seniority

This is a complete list of members of the United States Senate during the 94th United States Congress listed by seniority, from January 3, 1975, to January 3, 1977.

Order of service is based on the commencement of the senator's first term. Behind this is former service as a senator (only giving the senator seniority within his or her new incoming class), service as vice president, a House member, a cabinet secretary, or a governor of a state. The final factor is the population of the senator's state.Senators who were sworn in during the middle of the two-year congressional term (up until the last senator who was not sworn in early after winning the November 1976 election) are listed at the end of the list with no number.

Medical Device Regulation Act

The Medical Device Regulation Act or Medical Device Amendments of 1976 was introduced by the 94th Congress of the United States. Congressman Paul G. Rogers and Senator Edward M. Kennedy were the chairperson sponsors of the medical device amendments. The Title 21 amendments were signed into law on May 28, 1976 by the 38th President of the United States Gerald R. Ford.The U.S. legislation enacted in 1976 amended the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938 signed by the 32nd President of the United States Franklin D. Roosevelt.

National Emergencies Act

The National Emergencies Act (NEA) (Pub.L. 94–412, 90 Stat. 1255, enacted September 14, 1976, codified at 50 U.S.C. § 1601–1651) is a United States federal law passed to end all previous national emergencies and to formalize the emergency powers of the President.

The Act empowers the President to activate special powers during a crisis but imposes certain procedural formalities when invoking such powers. The perceived need for the law arose from the scope and number of laws granting special powers to the executive in times of national emergency. Congress can terminate an emergency declaration with a joint resolution signed into law. Powers available under this Act are limited to the 136 emergency powers Congress has defined by law.The legislation was signed by President Gerald Ford on September 14, 1976. As of February 2019, 59 national emergencies have been declared, more than 30 of which remain in effect.

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), enacted in 1976, is the principal federal law in the United States governing the disposal of solid waste and hazardous waste.

Vietnam Humanitarian Assistance and Evacuation Act of 1975

Vietnam Humanitarian Assistance and Evacuation Act of 1975 was U.S. congressional legislation proposed to designate financial resources for the evacuation and humanitarian aid of South Vietnam preceding the Fall of Saigon. The Act of Congress was to grant the 38th President of the United States a U.S. monetary fund as immediate foreign assistance for the South Indochina liberation movement during the military offensive by the People's Army of Vietnam, People's Liberation Armed Forces of South Vietnam, Viet Cong, and Viet Minh into Cochinchina.

On April 11, 1975, U.S. President Gerald Ford initiated discussions with the U.S. 94th Congressional session concerning legislation to assist the Republic of Vietnam. The 38th President's legislative plea regarding the U.S. House of Representatives bill 6096 concluded on May 1, 1975. The U.S. 94th House of Representatives rejected the Act in a vote of one hundred and sixty-two to two hundred and forty-six for U.S. monetary assistance facilitating freedom flights from the south French Indochina region.

United States Congresses (and year convened)

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