908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron

The 908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron is a provisional United States Air Force (USAF) unit. It is assigned to the 380th Expeditionary Operations Group at Al Dhafra Air Base in United Arab Emirates. It has supported combat operations in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria from this location. The squadron has a varied background, having been formed by a series of consolidations of no fewer than five distinct units.

The squadron is one of the oldest in the USAF. Its origins date to 16 June 1917, when the 18th Aero Squadron was organized at Rockwell Field, San Diego, California. This unit served as a pilot training squadron during World War I until it was demobilized in 1919. A second predecessor was also active under the same name at Rockwell for nine months in the early 1920s.

The third predecessor of the squadron was the 18th Headquarters Squadron, which served as the host Air Corps unit at Bolling Field, District of Columbia from 1922 until 1928.

The fourth predecessor of the squadron was the 18th Reconnaissance Squadron, which was activated at Langley Field, Virginia in 1936. The squadron saw combat during World War II as the 408th Bombardment Squadron in the South West Pacific Theater of World War II, where it earned two Distinguished Unit Citations and a Philippine Republic Presidential Unit Citation. Elements of the squadron also participated in the Battle of Midway. It was inactivated in the Philippines in 1946.

The 408th Bombardment Squadron was again activated at March Air Force Base, California in 1958 as part of Strategic Air Command (SAC) during the expansion of Boeing B-47 Stratojet wings during the Cold War. It was inactivated as the B-47 was being replaced by the longer-ranged Boeing B-52 Stratofortress.

The unit's fifth predecessor was also part of SAC as the 908th Air Refueling Squadron, stationed at Kincheloe Air Force Base, Michigan equipped with Boeing KC-135 Stratotankers. It stood alert at Kincheloe and deployed aircrews and aircraft to support combat operations in Vietnam until it was inactivated when the Air Force closed the base.

The squadron was converted to provisional status c. 2002 as part of the War on Terror. It has served as a McDonnell Douglas KC-10 Extender squadron in Southwest Asia since then, with KC-135 aircraft added in late 2003 until an undetermined time.[2]

908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron
Air Mobility Command
908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron - KC-10 Extenders
908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron KC-10 Extenders in Southwest Asia, 2010
Active1917-1919; 1921-1922; 1922-1928; 1936-1946; 1958-1962; 1963-1977, 2002 – present
Country United States
Branch United States Air Force
RoleAir Refueling
EngagementsSouth West Pacific Theater of World War II
War in Afghanistan
War in Iraq
Military intervention against ISIL
DecorationsDistinguished Unit Citation Philippine Republic Presidential Unit Citation
Insignia
908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron emblem
908th Air Refueling Squadron
408th Bombardment Squadron emblem (approved 9 February 1937 for the 18th Reconnaissance Squadron)[1]
408th Bombardment Squadron - Emblem

History

World War I

The first predecessor of the squadron was established in the summer of 1917 as the Air Service 18th Aero Squadron,[note 1] training aviation students during World War I at Rockwell Field in southern California. The squadron apparently operated Curtiss JN-4 and improved Curtiss JN-6 "Jenny" two-seat trainers and Thomas-Morse S-4 single-seat advanced trainers.[1] In July 1918, it was redesignated as Squadron B, Rockwell Field. It was demobilized in late 1918 when the training squadrons at Rockwell were combined into a single flying school detachment.[1]

Interwar period

The second predecessor of the squadron was established at Rockwell in 1921 as the 18th Squadron (Observation). Its mission as an observation squadron was to fly aerial photographic missions and to act as an airborne observation post during maneuvers, but it is not certain that the squadron was manned or equipped. It was inactivated nine months after its activation.[1]

The third predecessor of the squadron was organized in 1922 as the Headquarters Detachment, Bolling Field, District of Columbia. It replaced the 99th Squadron (Observation) as the Air Service host unit at Bolling responsible for station administration.[3] In 1924 the detachment was expanded to a squadron and the following year, it was redesignated the 18th Headquarters Squadron and consolidated with the two previous 18th squadrons. The squadron operated various aircraft at Bolling.[1] It was inactivated in 1928 and was replaced as the Air Corps host by the Air Corps Detachment, Bolling Field.[3]

The fourth predecessor of the squadron was established in 1935 as the 18th Observation Squadron and activated in 1936 at Mitchel Field on Long Island, New York. It was assigned to the 2d Wing of General Headquarters Air Force and equipped with Martin B-10 bombers.[1] The squadron flew reconnaissance and coastal patrol flights over Long Island Sound and southern New England. The squadron received Douglas B-18 Bolos in 1937 along with a mixture of obsolete attack and light observation aircraft[1] in the build-up before World War II The unit received early model Martin B-26 Marauders while retaining its B-18s.[1]

World War II

Crew of Lt. James Muri with Martin B-26 Marauder at Midway in June 1942
The crew of B-26 40-1391 "Susie-Q" of the 408th after making a torpedo attack at the Battle of Midway

Media related to 22d Bombardment Group (United States Army Air Forces) at Wikimedia Commons

After the Pearl Harbor Attack, the squadron was transferred to the West Coast, flying antisubmarine patrols from Muroc Army Air Field, California from December 1941 to the end of January 1942.[4] It was then assigned to Fifth Air Force.[5] By the time the squadron arrived in the Southwest Pacific Theater the situation on the Philippines was desperate, and the squadron was based in Australia, where it was redesignated as the 408th Bombardment Squadron.[1]

While the squadron was stationed at Reid River Airfield, Australia, two of the squadron's aircraft were diverted from their flight to Australia and flew missions during the Battle of Midway between 29 May 1942 and 4 June 1942.[6][7] These aircraft operated under the control of the Navy, whose Patrol Wing Two controlled both Army and Navy aircraft operating from Midway. They were armed with torpedoes and on 4 June, along with two B-26s of the 69th Bombardment Squadron of VII Bomber Command, attacked the enemy fleet. They met with heavy antiaircraft fire and opposition from enemy fighters. Two of the Marauders were shot down. Although the other two made successful attacks, both aircraft crash landed upon their return to Midway.[7] From Australia, the 408th also attacked Japanese targets on Papua New Guinea and New Britain. Its actions in New Guinea earned the squadron two Distinguished Unit Citations.[1] In October 1943 the B-26 Marauders were joined by North American B-25 Mitchells, and for the rest of the year the group continued to operate in support of Allied troops on New Guinea.[4]

33d Bombardment Squadron - B-24 Liberators
B-24 Liberators of the 22d Bomb Group

While stationed at Nadzab Airfield in February 1944 the unit converted to Consolidated B-24 Liberators optimized for long range bombing missions. While transitioning, the squadron was attached to the 309th Bombardment Wing for operational control.[8] With the new bombers came a designation as a heavy bomber unit. The squadron's Liberators attacked targets on Borneo, Ceram and Halmahera,[4] among them the crucial oil fields of the Dutch East Indies. In September 1944 the squadron moved its attention to the Philippines, attacking targets on Leyte. It moved to Leyte on 15 November 1944. From then until August 1945 it flew against targets on Luzon, as well as supporting the campaign on Borneo and even ranging as far as China.[4] Its actions in the Philippines won it a Philippine Presidential Unit Citation.[1] Finally, in August 1945 the unit moved to Okinawa, from where it flew a number of armed reconnaissance missions over southern Japan. The squadron moved on paper to the Philippines in November, leaving its personnel and equipment behind on Okinawa. It was inactivated at Fort William McKinley in early 1946.[4]

Cold War

22d Bombardment Wing Boeing B-47E-55-BW Stratojet 51-2394
22d Bombardment Wing Boeing B-47E Stratojet

Media related to 22d Bombardment Wing at Wikimedia Commons

The 408th was activated at March Air Force Base, California in 1958 when Strategic Air Command (SAC) expanded its wings flying Boeing B-47 Stratojets from three to four squadrons. In March 1961, President John F. Kennedy directed that the phaseout of the B-47 be accelerated. and the squadron was inactivated on 1 January 1962 as part of the drawdown of the USAF B-47 force. Two years later, the squadron was combined with the preceding units, but remained inactive.[1]

The 908th Air Refueling Squadron was activated on 1 July 1963 by SAC at Kincheloe Air Force Base, Michigan[9] and equipped with Boeing KC-135 Stratotankers. Its mission was to provide air refueling to the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress strategic bombers of its parent 449th Bombardment Wing and other USAF units as directed. This included taskings to provide air refueling for McDonnell F-4 Phantom II fighters and Douglas RB-66 Destroyer reconnaissance aircraft deploying to Southeast Asia.[10][11]

The unit deployed individual aircraft and crews to the Western Pacific region between 1966 and 1975 to support combat operations of deployed SAC units and tactical aircraft over Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War, including participation in Operation Young Tiger.[12][13] The squadron also deployed crews and aircraft to support the Torrejon, Eielson and Hickam Tanker Task Forces.[14]

In 1976 the squadron contributed to its parent 449th Bombardment Wing being awarded the Omaha Trophy as the best wing in SAC.[15] It was inactivated on 30 September 1977 when Kincheloe closed.[9][16]

In 1985, the 908th was consolidated with the 408th, but for the time, it remained inactive.[17]

Expeditionary operations

908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron - Patch
Subdued patch with 908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron emblem

The squadron was reactivated as the 908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron, a provisional squadron, about 2002 as a part of the War on Terror and equipped with McDonnell Douglas KC-10 Extenders. Boeing KC-135 Stratotankers were added in late 2003 until an undetermined time.[2] The squadron has been active as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom conducting combat air refueling. The squadron's KC-10s can refuel aircraft with either a boom or with a drogue, which makes it capable of refueling Air Force or Navy aircraft, as well as aircraft from other coalition air forces.[18] In 2010 the squadron flew the first combat mission with an all-female KC-10 crew.[note 2] While refueling strike aircraft in Afghanistan and Iraq, during 2011, the squadron supported an average of more than four "Troops in Contact" events daily and provided about a third of the airborne fuel used to protect ground forces.[19] It is currently supporting the Military intervention against ISIL in Iraq and Syria.[20]

Lineage

18th Aero Squadron

  • Organized as the 18th Aero Squadron on 20 August 1917
Redesignated 18th Aero Squadron (Training) c. 30 September 1917
Redesignated Squadron B, Rockwell Field on 23 July 1918
  • Demobilized on 23 November 1918
  • Reconstituted on 17 March 1925 and consolidated with the 18th Observation Squadron and Headquarters Squadron, Bolling Field as the 18th Headquarters Squadron[21]

18th Observation Squadron

  • Authorized as the 18th Squadron (Observation) on 30 August 1921
Organized on 1 October 1921
  • Inactivated on 23 July 1922
Redesignated 18th Observation Squadron on 25 January 1923 (remained inactive)
  • Disbanded on 18 February 1925
  • Reconstituted on 17 March 1925 and consolidated with Squadron B, Rockwell Field and Headquarters Squadron, Bolling Field as the 18th Headquarters Squadron[21]

18th Headquarters Squadron

  • Organized as Headquarters Detachment, Bolling Field on 11 July 1922
Redesignated Headquarters Squadron, Bolling Field on 6 October 1924
  • Consolidated on 17 March 1925 with Squadron B, Rockwell Field and the 18th Observation Squadron and redesignated 18th Headquarters Squadron
Inactivated on 31 March 1928
  • Disbanded on 1 October 1933
  • Reconstituted and consolidated in 1964 with 408th Bombardment Squadron as the 408th Bombardment Squadron[21]

408th Bombardment Squadron

  • Constituted as the 18th Observation Squadron (Long Range, Light Bombardment) on 1 March 1935
Redesignated 18th Reconnaissance Squadron and activated on 1 September 1936
Redesignated 18th Reconnaissance Squadron (Medium Range) on 6 December 1939
Redesignated 18th Reconnaissance Squadron (Medium) on 20 November 1940
Redesignated 408th Bombardment Squadron (Medium) on 22 April 1942
Redesignated 408th Bombardment Squadron, Heavy on 3 February 1944
Inactivated on 29 April 1946
  • Redesignated 408th Bombardment Squadron, Medium on 6 October 1958
Activated on 1 January 1959
Discontinued and inactivated on 1 January 1962
  • Consolidated in 1964 with the 18th Headquarters Squadron[21]
  • Consolidated on 19 September 1985 with the 908th Air Refueling Squadron as the 908th Air Refueling Squadron[17]

908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron

  • Constituted as the 908th Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy on 20 March 1963
Activated on 1 July 1963
Inactivated 30 September 1977[16]
  • Consolidated on 19 September 1985 with the 408th Bombardment Squadron[17] (remained inactive)
  • Converted to provisional status c. January 2002 and redesignated 908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron
Activated c. January 2002

Assignments

Stations

  • Rockwell Field, California, 20 August 1917 – 23 November 1918
  • Rockwell Field, California, 1 October 1921 – 23 July 1922
  • Bolling Field, District of Columbia, 11 July 1922 – 31 March 1928
  • Mitchel Field, New York, 1 September 1936
  • Langley Field, Virginia, 15 November 1940
  • Muroc Army Air Field, California, 9 December 1941 – 29 January 1942
  • Archerfield Airport (Brisbane), Australia, 25 February 1942
  • RAAF Base Townsville, Australia, 7 April 1942
  • Reid River Airfield, Australia, 12 April 1942
  • Dobodura Airfield, New Guinea, 15 October 1943
  • Nadzab Airfield, New Guinea, 22 December 1943
  • Owi Airfield, Schouten Islands, Netherlands East Indies, 26 July 1944
  • Dulag, Leyte, Philippines, c. 9 November 1944
  • Angaur Airfield, Palau, c. 1 December 1944
  • Guiuan Airfield, Samar, Philippines, 14 January 1945
  • Clark Field, Luzon, Philippines, 13 March 1945
  • Motobu Airfield, Okinawa, c. 21 August 1945
  • Fort William McKinley, Luzon, Philippines, 23 November 1945 – 29 April 1946
  • March Air Force Base, California, 1 January 1959 – 1 January 1962[21]
  • Kincheloe Air Force Base, Michigan, 1 July 1963 - 30 September 1977[9][16]
  • Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates, 2002–present

Aircraft

  • Curtiss JN-4, 1917-1918
  • Curtiss JN-6, 1917-1918
  • Thomas-Morse S-4, 1917-1918
  • Unknown, 1921–1922
  • DeHavilland DH-4 during the period 1922–1928
  • Ryan M-1 during the period 1922–1928
  • Douglas O-2 during the period 1922–1928
  • Boeing PW-9 during the period 1922–1928
  • Sikorsky OA-8, during period 1936–1940
  • North American B-25 Mitchell, 1941
  • Martin B-26 Marauder, 1941–1943
  • Consolidated B-24 Liberator, 1944–1945
  • Boeing B-47 Stratojet, 1959–1961[21]
  • Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker, 1963-1977
  • McDonnell Douglas KC-10 Extender, 2002–present
  • Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker, 2003–undetermined[2]

Awards and campaigns

Award streamer Award Dates Notes
Streamer PUC Army Distinguished Unit Citation Papua 23 July 1942-January 1943 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Streamer PUC Army Distinguished Unit Citation New Guinea 5 November 1943 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 July 1974-30 June 1976 908th Air Refueling Squadron[23]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 June 2002-31 May 2003 908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron[23]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 June 2003-31 May 2004 908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron[23]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 20 June 2011-19 June 2012 908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron[23]
Presidential Unit Citation (Philippines) Streamer Philippine Republic Presidential Unit Citation November 1944-4 July 1945 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Campaign Streamer Campaign Dates Notes
American Campaign Streamer Antisubmarine 7 December 1941 – 29 January 1942 18th Reconnaissance Squadron[1]
Streamer APC East Indies 25 February 1942 – 22 July 1942 18th Reconnaissance Squadron
(later 408th Bombardment Squadron)[1]
Streamer APC Air Offensive, Japan 17 April 1942 – 2 September 1945 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Streamer APC China Defensive 4 July 1942 – 4 May 1945 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Streamer APC Papua 23 July 1942 – 23 January 1943 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Streamer APC New Guinea 24 January 1943 – 31 December 1944 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Streamer APC Bismarck Archipelago 15 December 1943 – 27 November 1944 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Streamer APC Western Pacific 17 April 1944 – 2 September 1945 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Streamer APC Leyte 17 October 1944 – 1 July 1945 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Streamer APC Luzon 15 December 1944 – 4 July 1945 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Streamer APC Southern Philippines 27 February 1945 – 4 July 1945 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Streamer APC China Offensive 5 May 1945 – 2 September 1945 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Streamer APC Air Combat, Asiatic-Pacific Theater 25 February 1942 – 2 March 1946 408th Bombardment Squadron[1]
Iraq Campaign streamer (USMC) Undetermined 908th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron[note 3]

See also

References

Notes

Explanatory Notes

  1. ^ Another 18th Aero Squadron had been activated at Kelly Field, Texas in June 1917. It was redesignated as the 23d Aero Squadron (Repair) in June 1917. Maurer, Combat Squadrons, pp. 121-122
  2. ^ The crew consisted of Capt Lindsey Bauer, 1/Lt Jen Carter, SSG Sarah Lockley, and SSG Lindy Campbell. The crew jokingly referred to its KC-10 as an "unmanned aircraft" and designed a special patch to mark the occasion. Bergqvist, Pia (23 August 2010). "KC-10 Crew Completes Unmanned Aerial Refueling". Flying Magazine. Retrieved 14 February 2014.
  3. ^ Public release of campaign credit has not been made

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab Maurer, pp. 499–500
  2. ^ a b c Desjarlais Jr., Tech Sergeant, Orville F. "Snowflakes in the Desert" (PDF). af.mil. USAF. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 March 2004. Retrieved 29 January 2017.
  3. ^ a b Mueller, pp. 39–48
  4. ^ a b c d e Maurer, Combat Units, pp. 71–73
  5. ^ Maurer, Combat Units, pp. 72, 443, 461
  6. ^ "Abstract, History 408 Bombardment Squadron through 30 Jun 1943". Air Force History Index. Retrieved 15 February 2014.
  7. ^ a b Williams, E. Kathleen (June 1945). "Army Air Forces in the War Against Japan, 1941-1942, USAF Historical Study No. 34" (PDF). Assistant Chief of Air Staff, Intelligence, Historical Division. Retrieved 15 February 2014., pp. 116-119
  8. ^ "Abstract, History 408 Bombardment Squadron Feb 1944". Air Force History Index. Retrieved 15 February 2014.
  9. ^ a b c See Ravenstein, p. 245
  10. ^ "Abstract, Vol. 1 History 449 Bombardment Wing Jul-Sep 1967". Air Force History Index. Retrieved 14 February 2014.
  11. ^ "Abstract, Vol. 1 History 449 Bombardment Wing Apr-Jun 1970". Air Force History Index. Retrieved 14 February 2014.
  12. ^ a b Ravenstein, p. 245
  13. ^ "Abstract, Vol. 1 History 449 Bombardment Wing Apr-Jun 1968". Air Force History Index. Retrieved 14 February 2014.
  14. ^ "Abstract, Vol. 1 History 449 Bombardment Wing CY 1974". Air Force History Index. Retrieved 14 February 2014.
  15. ^ "Abstract, Vol. 1 History 449 Bombardment Wing Jan-Mar 1977". Air Force History Index. Retrieved 14 February 2014.
  16. ^ a b c "Abstract, History 449 Bombardment Wing Jul-Sep 1977". Air Force History Index. Retrieved 14 February 2014.
  17. ^ a b c Department of the Air Force/MPM Letter 662q, 19 September 85, Subject: Reconstitution, Redesignation, and Consolidation of Selected Air Force Tactical Squadrons
  18. ^ Savannah, TSG Amanda (25 September 2012). "908th EARS refuels aircraft in flight". US Air Force Central Command. Archived from the original on 23 February 2014. Retrieved 14 February 2014.
  19. ^ Moss, Lt Col Kenneth (9 January 2012) [8 January 2012]. "380th AEW and 908th EARS KC-10 Extender year in review". US Air Force Central Command. Archived from the original on 29 May 2012. Retrieved 14 February 2014.
  20. ^ Reid, Jr., Larry E. "Refueling the Coalition". www.afcent.af.mil. U.S. Air Forces Central Command. Retrieved 30 January 2017.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g Lineage, including assignements, stations, aircraft through 1964 in Maurer, Combat Squadrons, pp. 499-500
  22. ^ Probably Post Headquarters, Rockwell Field
  23. ^ a b c d "Air Force Recognition Programs". Air Force Personnel Center. Retrieved 18 February 2014.

Bibliography

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

Further Reading

  • Brosius, Jr., J.W. (1944). The Marauder:A Book of the 22nd Bomb Group. Sydney, Australia: Halstead Press.
  • Schroeder, Frederick A. (1985). Ducimus "We Lead" 22nd Bomb Group. Daytona Beach, FL: Hall Publishing Co.
  • Smith, Richard K. (1998). Seventy-Five Years of Inflight Refueling: Highlights, 1923-1998 (PDF). Air Force History and Museums Program. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office. Retrieved 13 August 2013.
  • Watkins, Robert A. (2013). Insignia and Aircraft Markings of the U.S. Army Air Force In World War II. Volume V, Pacific Theater of Operations. Atglen, PA: Shiffer Publishing, Ltd. pp. 72–73. ISBN 978-0-7643-4346-9. (Markings of unit B-24, B-25 and B-26 aircraft during World War II)

External links

2018 missile strikes against Syria

On 14 April 2018, beginning at 04:00 Syrian time (UTC+3), the United States, France, and the United Kingdom carried out a series of military strikes involving aircraft and ship-based missiles against multiple government sites in Syria. They said it was in response to the Douma chemical attack against civilians on 7 April, which they attributed to the Syrian government. The Syrian government denied involvement in the Douma attacks and called the airstrikes a violation of international law.

23rd Bomb Squadron

The 23rd Bomb Squadron is a United States Air Force unit, assigned to the 5th Bomb Wing. It is stationed at Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota. The mission of the squadron is to fly the Boeing B-52H Stratofortress strategic bomber. The squadron stands ready to deploy and fly its B-52Hs to enforce national security policy by being ready to deliver overwhelming nuclear or conventional firepower to destroy targets, worldwide, at any time.

The squadron is one of the oldest in the United States Air Force, dating to 16 June 1917, when it was organized at Kelly Field, Texas. It deployed to England as part of the American Expeditionary Forces, being engaged as an aircraft repair squadron during World War I. The squadron saw combat during World War II, and became part of the Strategic Air Command (SAC) during the Cold War.

380th Air Expeditionary Wing

The 380th Air Expeditionary Wing (380 AEW) is a provisional unit of the United States Air Force Air Combat Command (ACC). It is attached to the United States Air Forces Central component of ACC and is stationed at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates.About 1,200 active duty military members, Reserve, and Air National Guard personnel make up the Wing. Aircraft assigned: McDonnell Douglas KC-10A Extenders, Lockheed U-2 Dragon Ladies, Boeing E-3 Sentry (AWACS) and Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk. Its mission is air refueling and reconnaissance.

The Wing's origins date to 1942 when the 380th Bombardment Group was established. It operated primarily in the Southwest Pacific Theater as a Consolidated B-24 Liberator heavy bomber unit assigned to Fifth Air Force. The 380th Expeditionary Operations Group carries the lineage and history of its highly decorated World War II predecessor unit.

Active for over 40 years, the 380th Bombardment Wing was a component organization of Strategic Air Command's deterrent force during the Cold War, as a strategic bombardment wing.

380th Expeditionary Operations Group

The 380th Expeditionary Operations Group (380 EOG) is the operational flying component of the United States Air Force 380th Air Expeditionary Wing. It is a provisional unit stationed at Al Dhafra Air Base, United Arab Emirates, and is assigned to the United States Air Forces Central component of Air Combat Command (ACC).

The unit's World War II predecessor unit, the 380th Bombardment Group, operated primarily in the Southwest Pacific Theater as a B-24 Liberator heavy bombardment unit assigned to Fifth Air Force. In addition to flying combat missions, the group operated as a training unit for Royal Australian Air Force crews in B-24 operations. It was awarded both the United States Distinguished Unit Citation and the Philippine Presidential Unit Citation for its combat service in Borneo, New Guinea and the Philippines.

Reactivated in 2002, the 380 EOG conducts combat operations as part of the Global War on Terrorism.

List of United States Air Force air refueling squadrons

This is a list of United States Air Force air refueling squadrons.

McDonnell Douglas KC-10 Extender

The McDonnell Douglas KC-10 Extender is an aerial refueling tanker aircraft operated by the United States Air Force (USAF). A military version of the three-engined DC-10 airliner, the KC-10 was developed from the Advanced Tanker Cargo Aircraft Program. It incorporates military-specific equipment for its primary roles of transport and aerial refueling. It was developed to supplement the KC-135 Stratotanker following experiences in Southeast Asia and the Middle East. The KC-10 was the second McDonnell Douglas transport aircraft to be selected by the Air Force following the C-9. A total of 60 KC-10s were produced for the USAF. The Royal Netherlands Air Force operates two similar tankers designated KDC-10 that were converted from DC-10s.

The KC-10 plays a key role in the mobilization of US military assets, taking part in overseas operations far from home. These aircraft performed airlift and aerial refueling during the 1986 bombing of Libya (Operation Eldorado Canyon), the 1990–91 Gulf War with Iraq (Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm), the NATO bombing of Yugoslavia (Operation Allied Force), War in Afghanistan (Operations Enduring Freedom), and Iraq War (Operations Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn). The KC-10 is expected to serve until 2043.

Military intervention against ISIL aerial order of battle

This is the Military intervention against ISIL aerial order of battle, which lists the American forces and allies aerial assets that have taken part in the Military intervention against ISIL between June 2014 and the present day.

Wings
Groups
Squadrons
Leadership
Structure
Personnel and
training
Uniforms and
equipment
History and
traditions
Bases
Units
Major
weapon
systems
Commanders
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Airfields
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Airfields
Units

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