8th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 8th Emmy Awards, later referred to as the 8th Primetime Emmy Awards, were held on March 17, 1956, to honor the best in television of the year. The ceremony was held at the Pan Pacific Auditorium in Hollywood, California and was hosted by Art Linkletter and John Charles Daly. All nominations are listed, with winners in bold and series' networks are in parentheses.

The top shows of the night were The Phil Silvers Show, and Producers' Showcase. Each show won a record four major awards. Producers' Showcase, with its twelve major nominations, became the first show to receive over ten major nominations. (Both of these records were subsequently passed by multiple shows).

8th Primetime Emmy Awards
DateMarch 17, 1956
LocationPan Pacific Auditorium, Los Angeles, California
Presented byAcademy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted byArt Linkletter
John Charles Daly
Television/radio coverage
NetworkNBC

Winners and nominees

[1]

Programs

Best Comedy Series Best Dramatic Series
Best Variety Series Best Audience Participation Series (Quiz, Panel, Etc.)
Best Action or Adventure Series Best Children's Series
Best Documentary Program Best Special Event or News Program
Best Music Series Best Contribution to Daytime Programming
Best Single Program of the Year
  • Producers' Showcase, (Episode: "Peter Pan"), (NBC)
    • Disneyland, (Episode: "Davy Crocket and the River Pirates"), (ABC)
    • Ford Star Jubilee, (Episode: "The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial"), (CBS)
    • Make Room for Daddy, (Episode: "Peter Pan Meets Rusty Williams"), (ABC)
    • Producers' Showcase, (Episode: "The Sleeping Beauty"), (NBC)
    • The United States Steel Hour, (Episode: "No Time for Sergeants"), (CBS)
    • Wide Wide World (Episode: "The American West"), (NBC)

Acting

Lead performances

Best Actor in a Continuing Performance Best Actress in a Continuing Performance

Supporting performances

Best Actor in a Supporting Role Best Actress in a Supporting Role
  • Nanette Fabray as Various characters on Caesar's Hour, (NBC)
    • Ann B. Davis as Charmaine Schultz on The Bob Cummings Show, (Episode: "Schultzy's Dream World"), (CBS)
    • Jean Hagen as Margaret Williams on Make Room for Daddy, (ABC)
    • Audrey Meadows as Alice Kramden on The Honeymooners, (CBS)
    • Thelma Ritter as Aggie Hurley on Goodyear Television Playhouse, (Episode: "The Catered Affair"), (NBC)

Single performances

Best Actor in a Single Performance Best Actress in a Single Performance
  • Lloyd Nolan as Capt. Queeg on Ford Star Jubilee, (Episode: "The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial"), (CBS)
    • Ralph Bellamy as The Father on The United States Steel Hour, (Episode: "The Fearful Decision"), (CBS)
    • José Ferrer as Cyrano on Producers' Showcase, (Episode: "Cyrano de Bergerac"), (NBC)
    • Everett Sloane as The President on Kraft Television Theatre, (Episode: "Patterns"), (NBC)
    • Barry Sullivan as Defense Attorney Greenwald on Ford Star Jubilee, (Episode: "The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial"), (CBS)

Directing

Best Director for a Film Series Best Director for a Live Series
  • Franklin Schaffner for Ford Star Jubilee, (Episode: "The Cain Mutiny Court Marshall"), (CBS)
    • John Frankenheimer for Climax!, (Episode: "Portrait in Celluloid"), (CBS)
    • Clark Jones for Producers' Showcase, (Episode: "Peter Pan"), (NBC)
    • Delbert Mann for Producers' Showcase, (Episode: "Our Town"), (NBC)
    • Alex Segal for The United States Steel Hour, (Episode: "No Time for Sergeants"), (CBS)

Producing

Best Producer for a Film Series Best Producer for a Live Series
  • Walt Disney for Disneyland, (ABC)
    • James D. Fonda for You Are There, (CBS)
    • Paul Henning for The Bob Cummings Show, (CBS)
    • Nat Hiken for The Phil Silvers Show, (CBS)
    • Frank LaTourette for Medic, (NBC)

Writing

Best Comedy Writing Best Original Teleplay Writing
Best Television Adaptation
  • Paul Gregory, Franklin Schaffner, for Ford Star Jubilee, (Episode: "The Cain Mutiny Court Martial"), (CBS)
    • David Dortort, for The 20th Century Fox Hour, (Episode: "The Ox-Bow Incident"), (CBS)
    • John Monks, for The 20th Century Fox Hour, (Episode: "Miracle on 34th Street"), (CBS)
    • Rod Serling, for Climax!, (Episode: "The Champion"), (CBS)
    • David Shaw for Producers' Showcase, (Episode: Our Town"), (NBC)

Best Specialty Act - Single or Group

Best Specialty Act - Single or Group [2] [3]

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
  • CBS – 61
  • NBC – 54
  • ABC – 11
By program
  • Producers' Showcase (NBC) – 12
  • The United States Steel Hour (CBS) – 7
  • Ford Star Jubilee (CBS) / Make Room for Daddy (ABC) – 6
  • The Bob Cummings Show (CBS) / The Phil Silvers Show (CBS) – 5
  • Caesar's Hour (NBC) / Climax! (CBS) – 4
  • Alcoa-Goodyear Playhouse (NBC) / Disneyland (ABC) / The George Gobel Show (NBC) / The Honeymooners (CBS) / I Love Lucy (CBS) / Kraft Television Theatre (NBC) – 3

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
  • CBS – 14
  • NBC – 8
  • ABC – 2
By program
  • The Phil Silvers Show (CBS) / Producers' Showcase (NBC) – 4
  • Ford Star Jubilee (CBS) – 3
  • Disneyland (ABC) - 2
Notes
  1. ^ a b "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

References

  1. ^ Emmys.com list of 1956 Nominees & Winners
  2. ^ Emmys.com Best Specialty Act - Single or Group
  3. ^ IMDb.com Best Specialty Act - Single or Group

External links

28th Academy Awards

The 28th Academy Awards were presented at the RKO Pantages Theatre in Los Angeles, California. Marty, a simple and low-budget film usually uncharacteristic of Best Picture awardees, became the shortest film (as well as the second Palme d'Or winner) to win the top honor.

This was the final year in which the Best Foreign Language Film was a Special/Honorary award. Beginning with the 29th Academy Awards, it became a competitive category.

29th Academy Awards

During the 29th Academy Awards, the regular competitive category of Best Foreign Language Film was introduced, instead of only being recognized as a Special Achievement Award or as a Best Picture nominee (as in 1938). The first winner in this new category was Federico Fellini's La Strada with Anthony Quinn and a second nomination for Best Original Screenplay. Its win would help spur an interest in foreign-language films. Another Fellini film, Nights of Cabiria would win the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar in the following year.

This was also the first year that all of the five Best Picture nominees were in color. It was also the first Oscar telecast to be videotaped for later broadcast, especially for those network affiliates that didn't want to broadcast the event live.

All of the major awards winners were large-scale epics – Mike Todd's Around the World in 80 Days, The King and I, Anastasia, George Stevens' Giant, Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments (the highest-grossing film of the year), King Vidor's War and Peace and William Wyler's Friendly Persuasion. And the trend toward blockbusters and colorful spectaculars was established for years to come, with The Bridge on the River Kwai, Gigi, and Ben-Hur being subsequent Best Picture champions.

The Best Original Story category had two interesting quirks this year. First, the Oscar for Best Original Story for The Brave One was awarded to Robert Rich, a pseudonym of Dalton Trumbo, who was blacklisted at the time and thus unable to receive credit under his own name. Second, Edward Bernds and Elwood Ullman withdrew their names from consideration in this category for their work on High Society, as the nomination had been intended for the musical starring Grace Kelly, while Bernds and Ullman had instead written a Bowery Boys film of the same name. In fact, the nomination was a double mistake, as High Society was based on the play and film The Philadelphia Story and probably would not have qualified as an original story anyway.

James Dean became the only actor to receive a second posthumous – and consecutive – nomination for acting.

Ingrid Bergman was not present to collect her award for Best Actress: Cary Grant accepted it on her behalf. She did, however, list the nominees for Best Director via a pre-recorded segment from a rooftop in Paris. The winner was announced by host Jerry Lewis.

Director John Ford's classic western The Searchers, widely seen as one of the best American films of all time, failed to receive a single nomination.

This was the second time since the introduction of the Supporting Actor and Actress awards that Best Picture, Best Director, and all four acting Oscars were given to different films. This would not happen again until the 78th Academy Awards. Around the World in 80 Days became the sixth film to win Best Picture without any acting nominations.

9th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 9th Emmy Awards, later referred to as the 9th Primetime Emmy Awards, were held on March 16, 1957, to honor the best in television of the year. The ceremony was held at the NBC Studios in Burbank, California. Desi Arnaz hosted the event. All nominations are listed, with winners in bold and series' networks are in parentheses. Categories were sorted based on running time, instead of by genre.

The top shows of the night were Caesar's Hour and Playhouse 90. Each show won a then-record five major awards, (however, two of Playhouse 90's wins came in now defunct categories).

Caesar's Hour became the first show to be nominated in all four major acting categories. Caesar's Hour also made history when it swept the four acting categories. After over fifty years, it remains the only comedy or drama series to win every major acting award. In 2004, the miniseries Angels in America became the second show, and first miniseries/television movie, to sweep the acting field.

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