899

Year 899 (DCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
899 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar899
DCCCXCIX
Ab urbe condita1652
Armenian calendar348
ԹՎ ՅԽԸ
Assyrian calendar5649
Balinese saka calendar820–821
Bengali calendar306
Berber calendar1849
Buddhist calendar1443
Burmese calendar261
Byzantine calendar6407–6408
Chinese calendar戊午(Earth Horse)
3595 or 3535
    — to —
己未年 (Earth Goat)
3596 or 3536
Coptic calendar615–616
Discordian calendar2065
Ethiopian calendar891–892
Hebrew calendar4659–4660
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat955–956
 - Shaka Samvat820–821
 - Kali Yuga3999–4000
Holocene calendar10899
Iranian calendar277–278
Islamic calendar285–286
Japanese calendarShōtai 2
(昌泰2年)
Javanese calendar797–798
Julian calendar899
DCCCXCIX
Korean calendar3232
Minguo calendar1013 before ROC
民前1013年
Nanakshahi calendar−569
Seleucid era1210/1211 AG
Thai solar calendar1441–1442
Tibetan calendar阳土马年
(male Earth-Horse)
1025 or 644 or −128
    — to —
阴土羊年
(female Earth-Goat)
1026 or 645 or −127
Edward the Elder - MS Royal 14 B VI
King Edward the Elder (c. 874–924)

Events

By place

Europe

  • Summer – King Arnulf of Carinthia enlists the support of the Magyars to raid northern Italy. They overrun the Lombard plain all the way to Pavia. King Berengar I assembles a large army against the Magyars and confronts them near the Adda River. Daunted at the strong force, Árpád (head of the confederation of the Hungarian tribes) offers to make peace and restore much of what they've taken, if they are permitted to leave Italy unmolested. Berengar refuses and the Magyars withdraw to the Brenta River. Árpád renews his offer, offering to leave all his booty and even some hostages. Again Berengar refuses, and awaits their crossing of the Brenta River for a final battle.
  • Battle of the Brenta: The Magyar forces, consisting of 5,000 men, take a circuitous route through the mountains, crossing the Brenta River and proceed south to fall upon the encamped Lombard army (15,000 men) at Cartigliano. The Magyars massacre much of Berengar's unprepared army. He himself manages to escape to Pavia, changing his dress with the clothing of one of his soldiers. Árpád renews the offensive and heads across Lombardy, pillaging the countryside around Treviso, Vicenza, Bergamo and other towns all the way to Vercelli. He turns south and heads down the Aemilian Road, sacking Reggio Emilia, Modena and Bologna.[1]
  • December 8 – Arnulf of Carinthia dies from paralysis following a stroke and is entombed in St. Emmeram's Abbey at Regensburg (Bavaria). He is succeeded by his 6-year-old son Louis III (the Child) as ruler of the East Frankish Kingdom. Arnulf's counselor Hatto I, archbishop of Mainz, becomes regent and guardian of the young king. Louis (possibly at the instigation of Hatto) claims Lotharingia from his half-brother Zwentibold and with the support of the East-Frankish nobles he provokes a civil war. The Lombard throne is left temporarily vacant.
  • Winter – The Magyars turn back north towards the shores of the Venetian Lagoon. They pillage Chioggia and Pellestrina, and advance towards Malamocco. Their advance into the lagoon is checked by the assembly of the Venetian fleet under doge Pietro Tribuno, which defeats the Magyar's river-crossing vessels at Albiola, causing them to pull back. This close-call with the Magyars prompts the Venetians to initiate the fortification of the Rialto and the building of protective chains over the Grand Canal.

Britain

Arabian Empire

By topic

Religion

Births

Deaths

References

  1. ^ AF(B), 900 (p. 141 and n4), with a loss of 20,000 men and many bishops. Corroborated by Liutprand, Antapodosis.
  2. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, pp. 142–143. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5.
800 (number)

800 (eight hundred) is the natural number following 799 and preceding 801.

It is the sum of four consecutive primes (193 + 197 + 199 + 211). It is a Harshad number.

899 Naval Air Squadron

899 Naval Air Squadron was a Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm Aircraft carrier based squadron. Latterly it was the Sea Harrier training squadron based at RNAS Yeovilton.

899 Naval Air Squadron was reformed in 1979 as the training squadron for the Sea Harrier. It was initially based at RNAS Yeovilton (HMS Heron) until it was decommissioned in 2005 prior to the Stand up of 800 Naval Air Squadron GR7 at RAF Cottesmore.

Alfred the Great

Alfred the Great (Old English: Ælfrēd, Ælfrǣd, 'Elf-counsel' or 'Wise-elf'; between 847 and 849 – 26 October 899) was King of Wessex from 871 to c. 886 and King of the Anglo-Saxons from c. 886 to 899. He was the youngest son of King Æthelwulf of Wessex. His father died when he was young and three of Alfred's brothers reigned in turn. Alfred took the throne after the death of his brother Æthelred and spent several years dealing with Viking invasions. He won a decisive victory in the Battle of Edington in 878 and made an agreement with the Vikings, creating what was known as Danelaw in the North of England. Alfred also oversaw the conversion of Viking leader Guthrum. He successfully defended his kingdom against the Viking attempt at conquest, and he became the dominant ruler in England. He was also the first King of the West Saxons to style himself King of the Anglo-Saxons. Details of his life are described in a work by 9th-century Welsh scholar and bishop Asser.

Alfred had a reputation as a learned and merciful man of a gracious and level-headed nature who encouraged education, proposing that primary education be conducted in English rather than Latin, and improving his kingdom's legal system, military structure, and his people's quality of life. He was given the epithet "the Great" during and after the Reformation in the sixteenth century. The only other king of England given this epithet is Cnut the Great. In 2002, Alfred was ranked number 14 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons.

Arnulf of Carinthia

Arnulf of Carinthia (c. 850 – December 8, 899) was the duke of Carinthia who overthrew his uncle, Emperor Charles the Fat, became the Carolingian king of East Francia from 887, the disputed King of Italy from 894 and the disputed Holy Roman Emperor from February 22, 896 until his death at Regensburg, Bavaria.

Buckeye, El Dorado County, California

Buckeye is an unincorporated community in El Dorado County, California. It is located 2.5 miles (4.0 km) east-northeast of Georgetown, at an elevation of 2949 feet (899 m).

Buckna

Buckna (from Irish Bochnach, meaning 'hilly') is a small village four miles east of Broughshane in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is part of Mid and East Antrim District Council and is close to Mount Slemish.

Ducati 899

The Ducati 899 Panigale is a 898 cc (54.8 cu in) sport bike from Ducati, released in 2013 to replace the 848. The motorcycle is named after the small manufacturing town of Borgo Panigale. It has a 148-horsepower (110 kW) version of the engine in the previously released 1199 Panigale. Claimed dry weight is 169 kilograms (373 lb). The 899 has a conventional two-sided swingarm, unlike the 1199 which has a single-sided swingarm. The unconventional decision to use a two-sided swingarm on a superbike from Ducati was made because of the substantial upgrades added to the bike including electronically adjustable anti-lock brakes, traction control, electronic braking control, and a quickshifter. This is the first medium-sized Ducati that uses the Superquadro engine.

The 899 surprised observers by topping sales charts for all motorcycles in the UK for December 2013, at a price five times higher than the number two seller, the Honda CBF125 — a situation compared by The Telegraph to the Ferrari California outselling the Ford Focus.For 2016, Ducati revised the 899, including enlarging the engine to 955 cc (58.3 cu in) (the 959 Panigale).

Edward the Elder

Edward the Elder (c. 874 – 17 July 924) was King of the Anglo-Saxons from 899 until his death. He was the elder son of Alfred the Great and his wife Ealhswith. When Edward succeeded to the throne, he had to defeat a challenge from his cousin Æthelwold, who had a strong claim to the throne as the son of Alfred's elder brother and predecessor, Æthelred.

Alfred had succeeded Æthelred as king of Wessex in 871, and almost faced defeat against the Danish Vikings until his decisive victory at the Battle of Edington in 878. After the battle, the Vikings still ruled Northumbria, East Anglia and eastern Mercia, leaving only Wessex and western Mercia under Anglo-Saxon control. In the early 880s Æthelred, Lord of the Mercians, the ruler of western Mercia, accepted Alfred's lordship and married his daughter Æthelflæd, and around 886 Alfred adopted the new title King of the Anglo-Saxons as the ruler of all Anglo-Saxons not subject to Danish rule.

In 910 a Mercian and West Saxon army inflicted a decisive defeat on an invading Northumbrian army, ending the threat from the northern Vikings. In the 910s, Edward conquered Viking-ruled southern England in partnership with his sister Æthelflæd, who had succeeded as Lady of the Mercians following the death of her husband in 911. Historians dispute how far Mercia was dominated by Wessex during this period, and after Æthelflæd's death in June 918, her daughter Ælfwynn, briefly became second Lady of the Mercians, but in December Edward took her into Wessex and imposed direct rule on Mercia. By the end of the 910s he ruled Wessex, Mercia and East Anglia, and only Northumbria remained under Viking rule. In 924 he faced a Mercian and Welsh revolt at Chester, and after putting it down he died at Farndon in Cheshire on 17 July 924. He was succeeded by his eldest son Æthelstan.

Edward was admired by medieval chroniclers, and in the view of William of Malmesbury, he was "much inferior to his father in the cultivation of letters" but "incomparably more glorious in the power of his rule". He was largely ignored by modern historians until the 1990s, and Nick Higham described him as "perhaps the most neglected of English kings", partly because few primary sources for his reign survive. His reputation rose in the late twentieth century and he is now seen as destroying the power of the Vikings in southern England while laying the foundations for a south-centred united English kingdom.

Elói Mendes

Elói Mendes is a municipality in the south of the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais. In 2007 the population was 24.161 in a total area of 498 km². The elevation of the municipal seat is 899 meters.

Harwick, Pennsylvania

Harwick is a census-designated place within Springdale Township in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, United States. As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 899.

Impromptus (Schubert)

Franz Schubert's Impromptus are a series of eight pieces for solo piano composed in 1827. They were published in two sets of four impromptus each: the first two pieces in the first set were published in the composer's lifetime as Op. 90; the second set was published posthumously as Op. 142 in 1839 (with a dedication added by the publisher to Franz Liszt). The third and fourth pieces in the first set were published in 1857 (although the third piece was printed by the publisher in G major, instead of G-flat as Schubert had written it, and remained available only in this key for many years). The two sets are now catalogued as D. 899 and D. 935 respectively. They are considered to be among the most important examples of this popular early 19th-century genre.Three other unnamed piano compositions (D. 946), written in May 1828, a few months before the composer's death, are known as both "Impromptus" and Klavierstücke ("piano pieces").

The Impromptus are often considered companion pieces to the Six moments musicaux, and they are often recorded and published together.It has been said that Schubert was deeply influenced in writing these pieces by the Impromptus, Op. 7 (1822) of Jan Václav Voříšek and by the music of Voříšek's teacher Václav Tomášek.

List of Farm to Market Roads in Texas (800–899)

Farm to Market Roads in Texas, United States are owned and maintained by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT).

List of state highways in Louisiana (850–899)

The following is a list of state highways in the U.S. state of Louisiana designated in the 850–899 range.

List of state highways in Maryland shorter than one mile (800–899)

The following is a list of state highways in Maryland shorter than one mile (1.6 km) in length with route numbers between 800 and 899. Most of these highways act as service roads, old alignments of more prominent highways, or connectors between one or more highways. Many of these highways are unsigned and have multiple segments with the same number. Several of these highways have their own articles; those highways are summarized here and a link is provided to the main article. This list does not include highways where at least one highway of that number is at least one mile in length. All highways at least one mile in length have their own article. The highways shorter than one mile with the same number are covered in the main article for the highway.

Route 899 (Israel)

Route 899 is an east-west regional highway in the Upper Galilee in northern Israel. For almost its entire length of 63 km it proceeds parallel to the nearby border between Israel and Lebanon. In Israel, Route 899 is commonly known as the "highway of the north" (Hebrew: כביש הצפון, Kevish HaTzafon).

Rural Municipality of Longlaketon No. 219

Longlaketon No. 219 (2006 Population 899 ) is a rural municipality in Saskatchewan, Canada encompassing 1,024.61 square kilometers in area. The rural municipality maintains its office in Earl Grey, Saskatchewan. The rural municipality in conjunction with the provincial government is in charge of maintenance of highways in its area. As well, the municipality provides policing, fire protection and municipal governance for the rural district, with a reeve as its administrator.

Thahrat Talamnas

Thahrat Talamnas (Arabic: ظهرة تلمنس‎) is a Syrian village located in Maarrat al-Nu'man Nahiyah in Maarrat al-Nu'man District, Idlib. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), Thahrat Talamnas had a population of 899 in the 2004 census.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 899

United Nations Security Council resolution 899, adopted unanimously on 4 March 1994, after recalling Resolution 833 (1993) and considering a letter by the Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali concerning the matter of the Iraqi private citizens and their assets which remained on Kuwaiti territory following the demarcation of the international boundary between Iraq and Kuwait, the Council, acting under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, decided that compensation payments may be remitted to the private citizens concerned in Iraq, notwithstanding the provisions of Resolution 661 (1991).

Æthelflæd

Æthelflæd, Lady of the Mercians (c. 870 – 12 June 918) ruled Mercia in the English Midlands from 911 until her death. She was the eldest daughter of Alfred the Great, king of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex, and his wife Ealhswith. Æthelflæd was born around 870 at the height of the Viking invasions of England. By 878, most of England was under Danish Viking rule – East Anglia and Northumbria having been conquered, and Mercia partitioned between the English and the Vikings – but in that year Alfred won a crucial victory at the Battle of Edington. Soon afterwards the English-controlled western half of Mercia came under the rule of Æthelred, Lord of the Mercians, who accepted Alfred's overlordship. Alfred adopted the title King of the English, claiming to rule all English people not living in areas under Viking control. In the mid-880s, Alfred sealed the strategic alliance between the surviving English kingdoms by marrying Æthelflæd to Æthelred.

Æthelred played a major role in fighting off renewed Viking attacks in the 890s, together with Æthelflæd's brother, the future King Edward the Elder. Æthelred and Æthelflæd fortified Worcester, gave generous donations to Mercian churches and built a new minster in Gloucester. Æthelred's health probably declined early in the next decade, after which it is likely that Æthelflæd was mainly responsible for the government of Mercia. Edward had succeeded as King of the Anglo-Saxons in 899, and in 909 he sent a West Saxon and Mercian force to raid the northern Danelaw. They returned with the remains of the royal Northumbrian saint, Oswald, which were translated to the new Gloucester minster. Æthelred died in 911 and Æthelflæd then ruled Mercia as Lady of the Mercians. The accession of a female ruler in Mercia is described by the historian Ian Walker as "one of the most unique events in early medieval history".

Alfred had built a network of fortified burhs and in the 910s Edward and Æthelflæd embarked on a programme of extending them. Among the towns where she built defences were Bridgnorth, Tamworth, Stafford, Warwick, Chirbury and Runcorn. In 917 she sent an army to capture Derby, the first of the Five Boroughs of the Danelaw to fall to the English, a victory described by Tim Clarkson as "her greatest triumph". In 918 Leicester surrendered without a fight. Shortly afterwards the Viking leaders of York offered her their loyalty, but she died on 12 June 918 before she could take advantage of the offer, and a few months later Edward completed the conquest of Mercia. Æthelflæd was succeeded by her daughter Ælfwynn, but in December Edward took personal control of Mercia and carried Ælfwynn off to Wessex.

Historians disagree whether Mercia was an independent kingdom under Æthelred and Æthelflæd but they agree that Æthelflæd was a great ruler who played an important part in the conquest of the Danelaw. She was praised by Anglo-Norman chroniclers such as William of Malmesbury, who described her as "a powerful accession to [Edward's] party, the delight of his subjects, the dread of his enemies, a woman of enlarged soul". According to Pauline Stafford, "like ... Elizabeth I she became a wonder to later ages". In Nick Higham's view, medieval and modern writers have been so captivated by her that Edward's reputation has suffered unfairly in comparison.

Æthelwold ætheling

Æthelwold () or Æthelwald (died 902 or 903) was the younger of two known sons of Æthelred I, King of Wessex from 865 to 871. Æthelwold and his brother Æthelhelm were still infants when their father the king died while fighting a Danish Viking invasion. The throne passed to the king's younger brother (Æthelwold's uncle) Alfred the Great, who carried on the war against the Vikings and won a crucial victory at the Battle of Edington in 878.

After Alfred's death in 899, Æthelwold disputed the throne with Alfred's son, Edward the Elder. As senior ætheling (prince of the royal dynasty eligible for kingship), Æthelwold had a strong claim to the throne. He attempted to raise an army to support his claim, but was unable to get sufficient support to meet Edward in battle and fled to Viking-controlled Northumbria, where he was accepted as king. In 901 or 902 he sailed with a fleet to Essex, where he was also accepted as king.

The following year Æthelwold persuaded the East Anglian Danes to attack Edward's territory in Wessex and Mercia. Edward retaliated with a raid on East Anglia, and when he withdrew the men of Kent lingered and met the East Anglian Danes at the Battle of the Holme. The Danes were victorious but suffered heavy losses, including the death of Æthelwold, which ended the challenge to Edward's rule.

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