79th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

The 79th Armoured Division was a specialist armoured division of the British Army created during World War II. The division was created as part of the preparations for the Normandy invasion on 6 June 1944, D-Day. The division operated armoured vehicles modified for specialist roles, intended to assist with the landings on the beaches. The division remained in action during the North-west European Campaign, providing specialised support during assaults to the 21st Army Group and, occasionally, to American units.

79th Armoured Division
79th armoured division badge
Badge of the 79th Armoured Division
Active14 August 1942–20 August 1945
Country United Kingdom
Branch British Army
TypeSpecialised armour
SizeDivision
EngagementsWorld War II
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Major General Sir Percy Hobart

History

The division was formed as a standard armoured formation in November 1942, but, in March 1943, it was about to be disbanded for lack of resources. General Sir Alan Brooke, the Chief of the Imperial General Staff (CIGS), however, foresaw the need for specialised armoured vehicles and offered its command to Major-General Percy Hobart. Hobart, nicknamed "Hobo", accepted on the understanding that the 79th would be an operational division, not just a training and development one. The number assigned – 79 – appears to be in the higher infantry division series between the 78th Infantry Division and the low grade 80th Infantry (Reserve) Division. As an all-armoured formation, its infantry brigade, the 185th, was removed; the 27th Armoured Brigade remained as the nucleus of its new role, but was moved to the British 3rd Infantry Division in early 1944.

Hobart gave firm direction and the strange-looking tanks it developed and operated were known as Hobart's Funnies. They included tanks that floated, could clear mines, destroy defences, carry and lay bridges, and roadways - anything that would enable the invasion force to get ashore and break through the German defences. One less successful development was the Canal Defence Light, a giant light intended to dazzle enemy gunners, although it was used to provide artificial daylight during the attack on the Geilenkirchen salient.

Initially, 79th Armoured Division also had the usual contingents of Royal Artillery, Royal Engineers and other Army units attached, but these were removed after its change of role. After formation in October 1942, the 79th, based at the time mostly in Yorkshire, trained as a regular armoured division for about six months before the change of role.

The Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry, two Canadian units (the 1st Hussars and Fort Garry Horse) and three American units were trained on DD tanks by the division though not part of the formation itself. In mid-1943, the Assault Brigade RE was formed: its units were Assault Squadrons RE.

The British Army in Normandy 1944 B6656
Brigadier N. W. Duncan of the 30th Armoured Brigade watches the attack on Caen from beside his Humber scout car outside Beuville, 8 July 1944.

The formation did not operate as a single division: its vehicles were distributed as small units across the Divisions taking part in the landings and subsequent operations. At first, difficulties were encountered in persuading infantry commanders to use the specialised armour to best effect, but these were resolved with the appointment of representatives of the GOC to each formation where elements were assigned. The units of the 79th were distributed as short term assets to a particular operation or battle and once complete returned to the 79th, the liaison officers of the 79th having the power to recall the vehicles.

The Division was further used during the Battle for Brest,the battle for the Scheldt estuary (Operation Infatuate), the battle for the Roer Triangle (Operation Blackcock), the Rhine crossings (Operation Plunder) and the Elbe crossing to transport the assault troops and to re-supply.

The 79th Armoured Division was disbanded on 20 August 1945. Hobart subsequently commanded the Specialized Armour Development Establishment (SADE), which was formed from elements of the 79th together with the Assault Training and Development Centre.[1]

Unit insignia was a black bull's head with flaring nostrils superimposed over a yellow triangle; this was carried proudly on every vehicle.

Equipment

Sherman Crab

The Sherman Crab was a mine flail tank designed to clear a safe path through a mine-field by deliberately detonating mines in front of the vehicle. The Crab design was first used by the British during the North African Campaign. The Sherman Crab was a standard Sherman tank with the mine flail mechanism added.

The mine flail was a horizontal, rapidly rotating rotor held in front of the vehicle on two arms. Heavy chains (the "flails") fixed to the rotor continuously and violently struck the ground detonating the mines. The tank received little damage in the process, but had to travel slowly and the flails had to be replaced on a regular basis as the explosions broke the chains.

Churchill AVRE

The Churchill Armoured Vehicle Royal Engineers (AVRE) was a heavily modified Churchill III or IV that had a crew of six - five engineers that acted as the tank crew, and a driver. In place of the main gun was the "Petard", a 290mm spigot mortar that fired the 40 pound (18 kg) "Flying dustbin" demolition bomb. Designed to quickly destroy fortifications, the round had a 28-pound (13 kg) high-explosive warhead with a practical effective range of 90 metres.

The AVRE was designed after the Canadian failure at Dieppe. It could be fitted with numerous other attachments, such as mine ploughs, fascine bundles, carpet rollers, explosive placers, Bangalore torpedoes for clearing barbed wire obstacles, hand-emplaced demolition charges, amongst others. After the Second World War, the Churchill AVRE was re-armed with a breech-loaded low velocity 165mm demolition gun firing HESH shells.

Churchill ARK (Armoured Ramp Carrier)

A turretless Churchill with ramps at either end and along the body to form a mobile bridge. The Mark 1 had trackways over the tracks for vehicles to drive along. The Mark 2 was an improvised version and crossing vehicles drove directly on the Churchill's tracks.

Churchill Crocodile

One of the more notable Churchill variants, the Crocodile was a Churchill VII in which the hull machine gun was replaced with a flamethrower. The fuel was in an armoured wheeled trailer towed behind. It could fire several one second bursts over 150 yards. The Crocodile was one of "Hobart's Funnies".

Kangaroo armoured personnel carrier

The first Kangaroos were converted from M7 Priest self-propelled guns that had been used by the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division during the assault on Normandy. These were no longer needed, as their artillery regiments were re-equipped with towed 25 pdrs at the end of July. At a field workshop, they were stripped of the artillery equipment and the front aperture welded over, then sent into service carrying twelve troops. Since they carried infantry as a kangaroo carries its young, they were dubbed Kangaroos and the workshop carrying out the conversion also received that name. Infantry were said to be 'empouched' when they boarded a Kangaroo. They were first used in Operation Totalize south of Caen. At the end of August, the Priest Kangaroos were returned to the US Army, and other vehicles were converted. The majority of vehicles converted were Canadian Ram tanks, but a few Shermans and other Priests were also used (which were sometimes referred to as "unfrocked" or "defrocked" Priests). The name Kangaroo was applied to any similar conversion. They were operated by the 1st Canadian Armoured Carrier Regiment (1CACR) during Canadian attacks on the various Channel ports in late 1944, and later by the 49th Armoured Personnel Carrier Regiment. Both units were under command of the 79th Armoured Division from October 1944 until the end of the war.

Buffalo LVT 4

The first "Buffalo" Landing Vehicle Tracked could hold 24 men or 4,500 pounds (2,000 kg) of cargo. Originally intended to carry replenishments from ships ashore, they lacked armour protection and their tracks and suspension were unreliable when used on hard terrain.

Travelling at a respectable six knots in the water and twelve mph on land, it could deliver 24 fully equipped assault troops to the beach, and support them with fire from two .30 cal. machine guns. As it was not armoured, its thin steel hull offered virtually no protection. The tracks performed well on sand, but not on tough surfaces.

The 79th used the Buffalo at the Battle of the Scheldt during the crossing of the Rhine, along with the Terrapin.

Duplex Drive Sherman Tank

DD tanks (from "Duplex Drive" referring to its twin types of locomotion: tracks and propellers) were amphibious swimming tanks developed during the Second World War. The phrase is mostly used for the M4 Sherman medium tanks used by the Allies in the opening phases of the D-Day landings in 1944.

The swimming tank idea arose when it was realised that the first waves of infantry that reached an invasion beach would be acutely vulnerable without the support of tanks. However, if landing craft were used to carry those tanks, they themselves would be vulnerable to German heavy guns. The loss of too many landing craft would slow the movement of reinforcements from ships offshore and the invasion beaches would be choked with disabled and sunken landing craft. By giving tanks the ability to float, they could be launched from landing craft offshore and make their own way onto the beach.

Canal Defence Light

The Canal Defence Light (CDL) was a British secret weapon of the Second World War. It was based on the use of a powerful carbon-arc searchlight to dazzle and confuse enemy troops. A demonstration had shown that the use of a vehicle mounted searchlight disoriented the units facing it and masked activities behind the searchlight. The light was mounted in an armoured turret fitted to a tank. Initially, the Matilda tank was used, with its normal turret replaced by a cylindrical one containing the searchlight (shining through a vertical slit) and a machine gun. This was later replaced by the US M3 Grant, a larger roomier tank, better able to keep up with battle tanks, such as the Sherman and it had a hull mounted gun that was unaffected by the replacement of its normal turret. The addition of a blue or amber filter would make the light source seem further away or closer respectively and the operation of a shutter would create a flickering effect. The project was shrouded in secrecy and when it was tested at Kilbride Bay during Exercise Primrose in 1943, it was judged "too uncertain to be depended upon as the main feature of an invasion".

Sherman crab flail tank

Sherman Crab test; flail lowered into a dip; turret traversed rear to avoid flails

Churchill VII AVRE With Fascine

Churchill AVRE with fascine on tilt-forward cradle

Armoured Ramp Carrier 02

Churchill ARK Mk II

ChurchillTank

Churchill Crocodile

AVRE-Bobbin

Churchill AVRE with a bobbin and extended radiator intakes for wading

Churchill AVRE Petard

Close-up of an AVRE's Petard Mortar

D-day - British Forces during the Invasion of Normandy 6 June 1944 B5095

Medics are attending to wounded in the shelter of a Churchill AVRE from 5th Assault Regiment, Royal Engineers - Sword Beach, 6 June 1944

D-day - British Forces during the Invasion of Normandy 6 June 1944 B5040

Universal Carriers with deep wading screens pass through Lion sur Mer. A Churchill AVRE can be seen in the background, 6 June 1944

IWM-BU-2956-Ram-Kangaroo-Ochtrup-19450403

Infantry of 53rd (Welsh) Division in a Ram Kangaroo personnel carrier of the 79th Armoured Division, on the outskirts of Ochtrup, 3 April 1945

Acrossthescheldt

Buffalo LVT 4 amphibious vehicles taking Canadians across the Scheldt 1944

DD-Tank

DD Sherman tank with its flotation screen lowered

Order of battle

14 August 1942

The 79th Armoured Division was first raised as a conventional armoured division, with one Armoured Brigade, one Infantry Brigade and supporting arms.[2]

27th Armoured Brigade - Attached to the 79th Armoured Division from 8 September 1942 until 20 October 1943.

185th Infantry Brigade - Transferred out to 3rd Infantry Division on 9 April 1943.

HQ Royal Artillery – converted into 9th Army Group Royal Artillery on 1 May 1943[3]

1943

30th Armoured Brigade - Transferred to the division on 17 October 1943.

1st Assault Brigade and Assault Park Squadron RE - Formed on 1 November 1943

  • 5th Assault Regiment RE
  • 6th Assault Regiment RE
  • 42nd Assault Regiment RE
Operation Overlord (Normandy landings)[8]

The Division was under direct command of 21 Army Group, portions being placed in support of the Second Army for Operation Overlord.

1st Assault Brigade and Assault Park Squadron RE (AVRE)

  • 149 Assault Park Squadron, RE
  • 5th Assault Regiment RE
    • 77 Assault Squadron, RE
    • 79 Assault Squadron, RE
    • 80 Assault Squadron, RE
    • 26 Assault Squadron, RE
  • 6th Assault Regiment RE
    • 81 Assault Squadron, RE
    • 82 Assault Squadron, RE
    • 87 Assault Squadron, RE
    • 284 Assault Squadron, RE
  • 42nd Assault Regiment RE
    • 16 Assault Squadron, RE
    • 617 Assault Squadron, RE
    • 222 Assault Squadron, RE
    • 557 Assault Squadron, RE

30th Armoured Brigade (Sherman Crab)

Operation Market Garden

This is the order of battle on 17 September 1944, at the beginning of Operation Market Garden. The division was not involved in that battle, but was involved heavily in the battles for the Channel ports, such as Le Havre, and the Battle of the Scheldt.

30th Armoured Brigade (Sherman Crab)

1st Assault Brigade and Assault Park Squadron RE (AVRE)

  • 5th Assault Regiment RE
  • 6th Assault Regiment RE
  • 42nd Assault Regiment RE

1st Tank Brigade

31st Tank Brigade (Churchill Crocodile/Kangaroo (armoured personnel carrier))

Operation Varsity (Rhine crossing)

This is the order of battle for the division on 23 March 1945, which was the commencement of the crossing of the River Rhine, and the beginning of the final advance into Germany. As can be seen, the establishment of the division had grown as the requirement for specialised armour had increased.

1st Assault Brigade Royal Engineers (AVRE)

  • 5th Assault Regiment R.E.
  • 6th Assault Regiment R.E.
  • 42nd Assault Regiment R.E.
  • 87 Assault Dozer Squadron, R.E.
  • 149 Assault Park Squadron, R.E.

30th Armoured Brigade (Sherman Crab)

31st Armoured Brigade (Churchill Crocodile, Kangaroo (armoured personnel carrier))

33rd Armoured Brigade (LVT 4)

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Fletcher, p. 39
  2. ^ Joslen, p. 30.
  3. ^ 9th AGRA at RA 39–45, accessed 30 March 2015 Archived 4 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "142nd Fd Rgt at RA 39–45, accessed 30 March 2015". Archived from the original on 31 March 2016. Retrieved 30 March 2016.
  5. ^ 150th Fd Rgt at RA 39–45, accessed 30 March 2015 Archived 31 January 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ "55th A/T Rgt at RA 39–45, accessed 30 March 2015". Archived from the original on 31 March 2016. Retrieved 30 March 2016.
  7. ^ "119 LAA Rgt at RA 39–45, accessed 30 March 2015". Archived from the original on 23 July 2015. Retrieved 30 March 2016.
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 5 June 2016. Retrieved 3 February 2016.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

References

  • Richard Doherty, Hobart's 79th Armoured Division at War: Invention, Innovation and Inspiration, Barnsley: Pen & Sword, 2011, ISBN 978-1-84884-398-1.
  • D. Fletcher, Swimming Shermans: Sherman DD Amphibious Tank of World War II, Osprey Publishing, 2006.
  • Lt-Col H.F. Joslen, Orders of Battle, United Kingdom and Colonial Formations and Units in the Second World War, 1939–1945, London: HM Stationery Office, 1960/Uckfield: Naval & Military Press, 2003, ISBN 1-843424-74-6.
  • Keegan, John; Kenneth Macksey (1991). Churchill's Generals. London: Cassell. pp. 250–254. ISBN 0-304-36712-5.
  • Hastings, Max (1999). Overlord. London: Pan. p. 396. ISBN 0-330-39012-0.
  • Hobart, P C S; Montgomery, Field Marshal (1945). The story of 79th Armoured Division October 1942-June 1945. Hamburg: 79th Armoured Division. p. 314.

External links

Battle of Douvres Radar Station

The Battle of Douvres Radar Station was a military engagement of World War II as part of the Invasion of Normandy, that took place on the 17 June 1944. The attack was by British 41 Commando, Royal Marines, the station and area were defended mainly by Luftwaffe ground forces. Preceded by an artillery bombardment and supported by mine-clearing and anti-bunker tanks of 79th Armoured Division, the Royal Marines were able to secure the surrender of the garrison.

Burton upon Stather

Burton-upon-Stather is a village and civil parish in North Lincolnshire, England. The village is situated 5 miles (8 km) north from Scunthorpe, 5 miles north-west from Frodingham, and is near the east bank of the River Trent. The civil parish consists of Burton-upon-Stather and the hamlets of Normanby and Thealby; its population at 2001 was 2,737, increasing slightly to 2,753 at the 2011 census.

Index of World War II articles (0–9)

1 Alpine Division Taurinense

1st Alpini Regiment

1 Cent WWII (Dutch coin)

1st Mountain Artillery Regiment (Italy)

1 vs 40 (Zipang manga)

1. Jagd-Division

1.1"/75 caliber gun

10 cm K 17

10.5 cm FlaK 38

10.5 cm leFH 16

10.5 cm leFH 18/40

10.5 cm leFH 18

10.5 cm leFH 18M

10.5 cm Leichtgeschütz 40

10.5 cm Leichtgeschütz 42

10.5 cm schwere Kanone 18

100 mm field gun M1944 (BS-3)

100th Division (United States)

100th Guards Rifle Division

100th Light Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

101st Airborne Division (United States)

101st Infantry Division (France)

101st Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

101st SS Heavy Panzer Detachment

102nd Fortress Division (France)

102nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

102nd Infantry Division (United States)

103rd Infantry Division (United States)

104th Division (United States)

105 mm Howitzer M3

106th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

106th Infantry Division (United States)

107 mm divisional gun M1940 (M-60)

107 mm gun M1910/30

1077th Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Soviet Union)

10H64

10th Armored Division (United States)

10th Armoured Cavalry Brigade (Poland)

10th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

10th Army (Soviet Union)

10th Canadian Infantry Brigade

10th Division (Australia)

10th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

10th Indian Infantry Division

10th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

10th Infantry Division (Poland)

10th Marine Regiment (United States)

10th Motorized Cavalry Brigade (Poland)

10th Mountain Division (United States)

10th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

10th Reconnaissance Group (United States)

10th SS Panzer Division Frundsberg

10TP

110th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

110th Rifle Division

112 Gripes about the French

114th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

116th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

118th General Hospital US Army

11th (East Africa) Division

11th Airborne Division (United States)

11th Armored Division (United States)

11th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

11th Army (Soviet Union)

11th Army Group

11th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

11th Guards Army

11th Indian Infantry Division

11th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

11th SS Panzer Army

11th SS Volunteer Panzergrenadier Division Nordland

11th/28th Battalion, Royal Western Australia Regiment

12th Alpini Regiment

12.8 cm FlaK 40

12.8 cm PaK 44

120 mm M1 gun

121st Engineer Battalion (United States)

122 mm gun M1931/37 (A-19)

122 mm howitzer M1909/37

122 mm howitzer M1910/30

122 mm howitzer M1938 (M-30)

12th (Eastern) Division

12th Armored Division (United States)

12th Army (Soviet Union)

12th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

12th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

12th Infantry Regiment (United States)

12th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

12th SS Panzer Division Hitlerjugend

13 JG 52

13 Rue Madeleine

13. Unterseebootsflottille

13.2 mm Hotchkiss machine gun

138mm/40 Modèle 1927 gun

13th Airborne Division (United States)

13th Armored Division (United States)

13th Army (Soviet Union)

13th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

13th Foreign Legion Demi-Brigade

13th Guards Rifle Division

13th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

13th Waffen Mountain Division of the SS Handschar (1st Croatian)

140th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

141st Reserve Division (Germany)

142nd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

143rd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

148th Reserve Division (Germany)

14th Armored Division (United States)

14th Army (Soviet Union)

14th Army involvement in Transnistria

14th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

14th Indian Infantry Division

14th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

14th Infantry Division (Poland)

14th Mixed Brigade (Imperial Japanese Army)

14th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS Galicia (1st Ukrainian)

15 cm Kanone 18

15 cm sFH 13

15 cm sFH 18

15 cm sIG 33

150th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

150th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

151st Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

152 mm gun M1910/30

152 mm gun M1910/34

152 mm gun M1935 (Br-2)

152 mm howitzer-gun M1937 (ML-20)

152 mm howitzer M1909/30

152 mm howitzer M1910/37

152 mm howitzer M1938 (M-10)

152 mm howitzer M1943 (D-1)

152 mm mortar M1931 (NM)

152nd Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

153rd Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

153rd Rifle Division

154th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

155 mm Long Tom

15th (Scottish) Division

15th Airborne Corps

15th Army Group

15th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

15th Infantry Division (Poland)

15th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (1st Latvian)

16 inch Coast Gun M1919

16"/50 caliber Mark 7 gun

161st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

163rd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

164th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

164th Infantry Regiment (United States)

169th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

16th Armored Division (United States)

16th Battalion, Royal Western Australia Regiment

16th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

16th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

16th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

16th SS Panzergrenadier Division Reichsführer-SS

17 cm Kanone 18

176th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

17th Airborne Division (United States)

17th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

17th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

17th Infantry Division (India)

17th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

17th SS Panzergrenadier Division Götz von Berlichingen

183rd Volksgrenadier Division (Germany)

184th Rifle Division

18th Army (Soviet Union)

18th Army Group

18th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

18th Infantry Division (France)

18th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

18th Infantry Division (Poland)

18th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

1938 Changsha Fire

1939-40 Winter Offensive

1939 Tarnow rail station bomb attack

193rd Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

1940-1944 insurgency in Chechnya

1941 (film)

1941 Iraqi coup d'état

1941 Odessa massacre

1942 (video game)

1942 Luxembourgian general strike

1942: Joint Strike

1942: The Pacific Air War

1943 Naples post office bombing

1943 steel cent

1943: The Battle of Midway

1944-1945 killings in Bačka

1944 in France

1944: The Loop Master

1945 (Conroy novel)

1945 (Gingrich and Forstchen novel)

1945 Prime Minister's Resignation Honours

19th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

19th Infantry Division (India)

19th Infantry Division Gavninana

19th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

19th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (2nd Latvian)

1st (African) Division

1st Air Fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy

1st Armored Division (France)

1st Armored Division (United States)

1st Armoured Brigade (Poland)

1st Armoured Brigade (United Kingdom)

1st Armoured Division (Australia)

1st Armoured Division (Poland)

1st Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

1st Armoured Reconnaissance Brigade (United Kingdom)

1st Baltic Front

1st Belgrade Special Combat detachment

1st Belorussian Front

1st Canadian Armoured Brigade

1st Canadian Infantry Division

1st Canadian Tank Brigade

1st Cavalry Army (Soviet Union)

1st Cavalry Division (United States)

1st Colonial Infantry Division (France)

1st Cossack Division

1st Czechoslovak Armoured Brigade

1st Division (Australia)

1st Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

1st Far East Front

1st Free French Division

1st Grenadiers Division (Poland)

1st Guards Army (Soviet Union)

1st Guards Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

1st Guards Special Rifle Corps

1st Guards Tank Army (Soviet Union)

1st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

1st Infantry Division (Slovak Republic)

1st Infantry Division (South Africa)

1st Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

1st Infantry Division (United States)

1st Legions Infantry Division (Poland)

1st Light Cavalry Division (France)

1st Light Division (Germany)

1st Light Mechanized Division (France)

1st Marine Division (United States)

1st Marine Infantry Parachute Regiment

1st Moroccan Infantry Division

1st Motor Machine Gun Brigade

1st Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

1st Naval Infantry Division (Germany)

1st Operations Group

1st Panzer Army

1st Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

1st Parachute Army (Germany)

1st Parachute Battalion (Australia)

1st Parachute Division (Germany)

1st Photo Squadron (Detachment C)

1st Red Banner Army

1st Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

1st Shock Army

1st Ski Division (Germany)

1st Special Service Brigade (United kingdom)

1st SS Division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler

1st Tank Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

1st Ukrainian Front

2-inch mortar

2 Alpine Division Tridentina

2nd Engineer Regiment (Italy)

2 cm FlaK 30

2 cm KwK 30

2nd Mountain Artillery Regiment (Italy)

2 or 3 Things I Know About Him

2. Jagd-Division

2.8 cm sPzB 41

2/11th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/12th Field Ambulance (Australia)

2/18th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/1st Australian Infantry Battalion

2/25th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/2nd Australian Infantry Battalion

2/3rd Australian Infantry Battalion

2/4th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/5th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/6th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/6th Cavalry Commando Regiment (Australia)

2/7th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/8th Australian Infantry Battalion

20 mm AA Machine Cannon Carrier Truck

20 mm Anti-Aircraft Tank "Ta-Se"

200th Division (National Revolutionary Army)

201st Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

202nd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

203 mm howitzer M1931 (B-4)

203mm/50 Modèle 1924 gun

203mm/55 Modèle 1931 gun

205th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

206th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

207th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

208th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

208th Rifle Division

20th Armored Division (United States)

20th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

20th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

20th Infantry Division (India)

20th Infantry Division (Poland)

20th Mountain Army (Wehrmacht)

20th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

20th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (1st Estonian)

21 cm Mörser 18

210 mm gun M1939 (Br-17)

210th Coastal Defense Division (Germany)

210th Independent Infantry Brigade (Home)

212th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

214th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

216th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

218th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

21st Army (Wehrmacht)

21st Army Group

21st Infantry Division (France)

21st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

21st Mountain Infantry Division (Poland)

21st Norwegian Army (Germany)

21st Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

21st Waffen Mountain Division of the SS Skanderbeg (1st Albanian)

223rd Independent Infantry Brigade (Home)

22nd Air Landing Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

22nd Army (Soviet Union)

22nd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

22nd Infantry Division (France)

22nd Mountain Infantry Division (Poland)

22nd Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

22nd SS Volunteer Cavalry Division Maria Theresia

230th Coastal Defense Division (Germany)

23rd (Northumbrian) Division

23rd Army (Soviet Union)

23rd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

23rd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

23rd Infantry Division (India)

23rd Infantry Division (Poland)

23rd Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

23rd Waffen Mountain Division of the SS Kama

240 mm howitzer M1

240mm/50 Modèle 1902 gun

243rd Static Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

246th Volksgrenadier Division (Wehrmacht)

24th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

24th Infantry Division (United States)

24th Mixed Brigade (Imperial Japanese Army)

24th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

24th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

25 Cent WWII (Dutch coin)

25 mm automatic air defense gun M1940 (72-K)

25 mm Hotchkiss anti-aircraft gun

25 mm Hotchkiss anti-tank gun

25. Unterseebootsflottille

25th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

25th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

25th Infantry Division (India)

25th Infantry Division (United States)

25th Motorized Division (France)

25th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

25th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

25th SS Grenadier Division Hunyadi (1st Hungarian)

25th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS Hunyadi (1st Hungarian)

25th/49th Battalion, Royal Queensland Regiment

26th Armoured Brigade (United Kingdom)

26th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

26th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

26th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

26th Infantry Division (United States)

26th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (2nd Hungarian)

270th Rifle Division

273rd Reserve Panzer Division

275th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

277th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

27th Armoured Brigade

27th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

27th Guards Rifle Division

27th Home Army Infantry Division (Poland)

27th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

27th Infantry Division (Poland)

27th Infantry Division (Sila)

27th Infantry Division (United States)

27th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

27th Truck-Moveable Division (Brescia)

281st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

286th Security Division (Germany)

289th Military Police Company

28th Armoured Brigade (United Kingdom)

28th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

28th Infantry Division (Poland)

28th Infantry Division (United States)

28th Jäger Division (Wehrmacht)

292nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

299th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

29th Armoured Brigade (United Kingdom)

29th Army (Soviet Union)

29th Flight Training Wing

29th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

29th Infantry Division (United States)

29th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (1st Italian)

2nd (African) Division

2nd Armored Division (France)

2nd Armored Division (United States)

2nd Armoured Division (Australia)

2nd Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

2nd Armoured Regiment (Poland)

2nd Belorussian Front

2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade

2nd Canadian Infantry Division

2nd Cavalry Division (United States)

2nd Division (Australia)

2nd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

2nd Division (Norway)

2nd Far Eastern Front

2nd Guards Army (Soviet Union)

2nd Guards Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

2nd Guards Mixed Brigade (Japan)

2nd Guards Tank Army (Soviet Union)

2nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

2nd Infantry Division (India)

2nd Infantry Division (South Africa)

2nd Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

2nd Infantry Division (United States)

2nd Infantry Regiment (United States)

2nd Light Cavalry Division (France)

2nd Light Division (Germany)

2nd Light Mechanized Division (France)

2nd London Infantry Division

2nd Marine Division (United States)

2nd Marine Regiment (United States)

2nd Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

2nd Naval Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

2nd North African Infantry Division

2nd Panzer Army

2nd Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

2nd Panzer Group

2nd Parachute Division (Germany)

2nd Red Banner Army

2nd Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

2nd Shock Army

2nd SS Division Das Reich

2nd Tank Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

3 Alpine Division Julia

3rd Alpini Regiment

3 inch Gun M5

3rd Mountain Artillery Regiment (Italy)

3"/50 caliber gun

3.7 cm FlaK 43

3.7 cm KwK 36

3.7 cm PaK 36

3.7 inch Mountain Howitzer

301 Military Hospital

301st Air Refueling Wing

302nd Static Infantry Division (Germany)

305 mm howitzer M1939 (Br-18)

305mm/45 Modèle 1906 gun

305th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

308th Armament Systems Wing

30th Armoured Brigade

30th Infantry Division (United States)

30th Mechanized Brigade (Ukraine)

30th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (1st Belarussian)

30th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (2nd Russian)

318th Fighter Group

31st Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

31st Guards Rifle Division

31st Infantry Division (United States)

322nd Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

323d Flying Training Wing

324th Fighter Group

324th Rifle Division

326th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

32nd Infantry Division (France)

32nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

32nd Infantry Division (United States)

32nd Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

33/5

330mm/50 Modèle 1931 gun

331st Bombardment Group

332d Fighter Group

332nd Static Infantry Division (Germany)

333d Bombardment Group

334th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

336th Training Group

33rd Army (Soviet Union)

33rd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

33rd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

33rd Infantry Division (United States)

33rd Mixed Brigade (Imperial Japanese Army)

33rd Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS Charlemagne (1st French)

340mm/45 Modèle 1912 gun

340th Bombardment Group

345th Bomb Group

346th Bombardment Group

349th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

349th Squadron (Belgium)

34th Brigade (Australia)

34th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

34th Infantry Division (United States)

350th Squadron (Belgium)

351st Bomb Group

352d Fighter Group

352nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

357th Fighter Group

359th Fighter Group

35th Army (Soviet Union)

35th Infantry Division (United States)

35th SS and Police Grenadier Division

36 Hours (1965 film)

361st Fighter Group

365th Fighter Group

369th (Croatian) Reinforced Infantry Regiment

369th (Croatian) Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

36th Battalion (Australia)

36th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

36th Infantry Division (United States)

36th Infantry Regiment (Poland)

37 mm anti-tank gun M1930 (1-K)

37 mm automatic air defense gun M1939 (61-K)

37 mm Gun M3

37mm Gun M1

37th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

37th Infantry Division (United States)

37th SS Volunteer Cavalry Division Lützow

373rd (Croatian) Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

38 cm SKC 34 naval gun

380mm/45 Modèle 1935 gun

380th Bomb Group

381st Training Group

382d Bombardment Group

383d Bombardment Group

383rd Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

385th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

38th (Irish) Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

38th (Welsh) Division

38th Infantry Division (United States)

391st Bombardment Group

392nd (Croatian) Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

392nd Strategic Missile Wing

393d Bombardment Group

394th Bombardment Group

396th Bombardment Group

397th Bombardment Wing

399th Bombardment Group

39M Csaba

39th Battalion (Australia)

39th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

39th Infantry Division (India)

39th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

3d Armored Cavalry Regiment (United States)

3d Combat Cargo Group

3d United States Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard)

3M-54 Klub

3rd Algerian Infantry Division

3rd Armored Division (France)

3rd Armored Division (United States)

3rd Armoured Division (Australia)

3rd Army (Soviet Union)

3rd Battalion 3rd Marines

3rd Belorussian Front

3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (United States)

3rd Canadian Infantry Division

3rd Division (Australia)

3rd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

3rd Division (New Zealand)

3rd Guards Army (Soviet Union)

3rd Guards Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

3rd Guards Tank Army (Soviet Union)

3rd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

3rd Infantry Division (South Africa)

3rd Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

3rd Infantry Division (United States)

3rd Light Division (Germany)

3rd Light Mechanized Division (France)

3rd Marine Division (United States)

3rd Motor Rifle Division

3rd Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

3rd North African Infantry Division

3rd Panzer Army

3rd Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

3rd Panzer Group

3rd Polish Infantry Brigade

3rd Shock Army (Soviet Union)

3rd SS Division Totenkopf

3rd Tank Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

3rd/4th County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters)

4 Alpine Division Cuneense

4th Alpini Regiment

4th Mountain Artillery Regiment (Italy)

4"/50 caliber gun

4.2 cm PaK 41

4.5 inch Gun M1

40 cm/45 Type 94

40 M Turan I

400th Bombardment Group

405th Fighter Group

409th Bombardment Group

40th Air Expeditionary Wing

40th Army (Soviet Union)

40th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

40th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

40th Infantry Division (United States)

413th Fighter Group

414th Fighter Group

41st Infantry Division (France)

41st Infantry Division (United States)

42nd (East Lancashire) Division

42nd Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

42nd Infantry Division (United States)

43rd (Wessex) Infantry Division

43rd Infantry Division (United States)

441st Troop Carrier Group

443d Troop Carrier Group

444th Bombardment Group

449th Bombardment Wing

44th (Home Counties) Infantry Division

44th Airborne Division (India)

44th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

44th Infantry Division (United States)

45 mm anti-tank gun M1937 (53-K)

45 mm anti-tank gun M1942 (M-42)

453rd Bombardment Group

454th Bombardment Wing

456th Bomb Group

458th Bombardment Group

45th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

45th Infantry Division (United States)

45th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

460th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion (United States)

461st Bombardment Wing

462d Bombardment Group

463d Airlift Group

464th Tactical Airlift Wing

465th Bombardment Wing

466th Bombardment Group

467th Bombardment Group

468th Bombardment Group

46th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

46th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

47 mm APX anti-tank gun

470th Bombardment Group

477th Fighter Group

483d Composite Wing

489th Bombardment Group

48th (South Midland) Division

48th Armored Medical Battalion

490th Bombardment Group

491st Bombardment Group

493d Bombardment Group

494th Bombardment Group

49th (West Riding) Infantry Division

49th Hutsul Rifle Regiment

49th Parallel

4th Armored Division (United States)

4th Army (Soviet Union)

4th Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (United States)

4th Canadian (Armoured) Division

4th Canadian Armoured Brigade

4th Canadian Infantry Brigade

4th Cavalry Regiment (United States)

4th Combat Cargo Group

4th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

4th Fighter Group

4th Guards Army (Soviet Union)

4th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

4th Infantry Division (India)

4th Infantry Division (Poland)

4th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

4th Infantry Division (United States)

4th Infantry Regiment (United States)

4th Light Cavalry Division (France)

4th Luftwaffe Field Division (Germany)

4th Marine Division (United States)

4th Mixed Brigade (Imperial Japanese Army)

4th Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

4th North African Infantry Division

4th Panzer Army

4th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

4th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

4th SS Polizei Division

4th SS Volunteer Panzergrenadier Brigade Netherlands

4th Tank Army (Soviet Union)

4th Tank Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

4th Territorial Army Corps (Romania)

4th Ukrainian Front

5 Alpine Division Pusteria

5th Alpini Regiment

5 cm KwK 38

5 cm KwK 39

5 cm PaK 38

5th Mountain Artillery Regiment (Italy)

5"/25 caliber gun

5"/38 caliber gun

5"/51 caliber gun

500th SS Parachute Battalion

501st Parachute Infantry Regiment (United States)

502d Bombardment Group

502nd Heavy Tank Battalion (Germany)

503rd heavy tank battalion (Germany)

504th Bombardment Group

509th heavy tank battalion (Germany)

509th Operations Group

50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division

51st (Highland) Infantry Division (World War II)

51st Army (Soviet Union)

52nd (Lowland) Division

53rd (Welsh) Division

53rd Infantry Division (France)

5535 Annefrank

55th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

55th Infantry Division (France)

55th Infantry Division (Poland)

55th Operations Group

562nd Grenadier Division (Germany)

56th (London) Division

56th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

56th Field Artillery Command

56th Fighter Group

56th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

57 mm anti-tank gun M1943 (ZiS-2)

57th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

58th Army (Soviet Union)

58th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

596th Parachute Combat Engineer Company (United States)

59th Guards Rifle Division

5th Armored Division (France)

5th Armored Division (United States)

5th Army (Wehrmacht)

5th Army (Soviet Union)

5th Canadian (Armoured) Division

5th Canadian Division

5th Canadian Infantry Brigade

5th Cavalry Brigade (United Kingdom)

5th Division (Australia)

5th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

5th Guards Tank Army (Soviet Union)

5th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

5th Infantry Division (India)

5th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

5th Infantry Division (United States)

5th Light Cavalry Division (France)

5th Marine Division (United States)

5th Motorized Division (France)

5th Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

5th North African Infantry Division

5th Panzer Army

5th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

5th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

5th SS Panzergrenadier Division Wiking

5th SS Volunteer Sturmbrigade Wallonien

6 Alpine Division Alpi Graie

6th Alpini Regiment

6 inch 26 cwt howitzer

6th Mountain Artillery Regiment (Italy)

60 pounder

60th Infantry Division (France)

60th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

61st Infantry Division (France)

61st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

61st Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

62nd Army (Soviet Union)

62nd Battalion (Australia)

633 Squadron

63rd Army (Soviet Union)

63rd Infantry Division (United States)

64 Baker Street

65th Infantry Division (United States)

66th (East Lancashire) Infantry Division

66th Infantry Division (United States)

68th Infantry Division (France)

68th Observation Group

69th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

69th Infantry Division (United States)

6th Airlanding Brigade (United Kingdom)

6th Armored Division (United States)

6th Armoured Division (South Africa)

6th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

6th Army (Soviet Union)

6th Canadian Infantry Brigade

6th Canadian Infantry Division

6th Cavalry Regiment (United States)

6th Division (Australia)

6th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

6th Guards Tank Army

6th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

6th Infantry Division (Poland)

6th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

6th Infantry Division (United States)

6th Infantry Regiment (United States)

6th Luftwaffe Field Division (Germany)

6th Marine Division (United States)

6th Marine Division on Okinawa

6th Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

6th Panzer Army

6th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

6th Parachute Division (Germany)

6th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

6th SS Mountain Division Nord

6th SS Volunteer Sturmbrigade Langemarck

7th Alpini Regiment

7 cm Mountain Gun

7.5 cm FK 16 nA

7.5 cm FK 18

7.5 cm FK 38

7.5 cm FK 7M85

7.5 cm Infanteriegeschütz 37

7.5 cm Infanteriegeschütz 42

7.5 cm KwK 37

7.5 cm KwK 40

7.5 cm KwK 42

7.5 cm L/45 M/16 anti aircraft gun

7.5 cm L/45 M/32 anti aircraft gun

7.5 cm leichtes Infanteriegeschütz 18

7.5 cm Leichtgeschütz 40

7.5 cm PaK 39

7.5 cm PaK 40

7.5 cm PaK 41

7.5 cm PaK 97/38

7.62 cm PaK 36(r)

7.92 mm DS

700 Naval Air Squadron

709th Static Infantry Division (Germany)

70th Armor Regiment (United States)

70th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

70th Infantry Division (United States)

715th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

716th Static Infantry Division (Germany)

719th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

71st Infantry Division (France)

71st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

71st Infantry Division (United States)

71st Infantry Regiment (New York)

72nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

72nd Mechanized Brigade (Ukraine)

73rd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

74th Infantry Regiment (Poland)

75 mm gun (US)

75 mm Schneider-Danglis 06/09

758th Tank Battalion (United States)

75th Guards Rifle Division

75th Infantry Division (United States)

76 mm air defense gun M1938

76 mm divisional gun M1902/30

76 mm divisional gun M1936 (F-22)

76 mm divisional gun M1939 (USV)

76 mm divisional gun M1942 (ZiS-3)

76 mm gun M1

76 mm mountain gun M1938

76 mm regimental gun M1927

76 mm regimental gun M1943

761st Tank Battalion (United States)

76th Division (United States)

76th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

76th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

76th Reconnaissance Group

76th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

77th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

77th Infantry Division (United States)

78th Division (United States)

78th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

78th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

78th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

79th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

79th Fighter Group

79th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

79th Infantry Division (United States)

79th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery

7th Armored Division (United States)

7th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

7th Army (Wehrmacht)

7th Army (Soviet Union)

7th Canadian Infantry Brigade

7th Canadian Infantry Division

7th Cavalry Regiment (United States)

7th Division (Australia)

7th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

7th Field Artillery Regiment (United States)

7th Guards Army

7th Indian Infantry Division

7th Infantry Division (United States)

7th Marine Regiment (United States)

7th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

7th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

7th SS Volunteer Mountain Division Prinz Eugen

7TP

8th Alpini Regiment

8 cm FK M. 17

8 cm PAW 600

8 cm sGrW 34

8 inch Gun M1

8.8 cm KwK 36

8.8 cm KwK 43

8.8 cm PaK 43

805th Engineer Aviation Battalion (United States)

80th Division (United States)

80th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

80th Rifle Division

81st (West Africa) Division

81st Infantry Division (United States)

82-PM-37

82nd (West Africa) Division

82nd Airborne Division (United States)

83rd Infantry Division (Germany)

83rd Infantry Division (United States)

84 Avenue Foch

84th Division (United States)

85 mm air defense gun M1939 (52-K)

85th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

86th Infantry Division (United States)

87th Division (United States)

87th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

88 mm gun

88th Division (National Revolutionary Army)

88th Infantry Division (United States)

89th "Tamanyan" Rifle Division

89th Division (United States)

8th Armored Division (United States)

8th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

8th Army (Soviet Union)

8th Division (Australia)

8th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

8th Guards Army (Soviet Union)

8th Infantry Division (France)

8th Infantry Division (India)

8th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

8th Infantry Division (United States)

8th Marine Regiment (United States)

8th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

8th SS Cavalry Division Florian Geyer

9th Alpini Regiment

9 Parachute Squadron RE

90 mm gun

904 Expeditionary Air Wing (United Kingdom)

90th Infantry Division (United States)

90th Light Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

914th Grenadier Regiment

916th Grenadier Regiment (Germany)

91st Bomb Group

91st Division (United States)

91st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

92nd Infantry Division (United States)

93rd Infantry Division (United States)

94th Infantry Division (United States)

95th Bomb Group

95th Infantry Division (United States)

96th Infantry Division (United States)

97th Infantry Division (United States)

97th Mechanized Brigade (Ukraine)

98th Division (United States)

98th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

999th Light Afrika Division (Germany)

99th Infantry Division (United States)

99th Light Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

99th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

9th (Highland) Infantry Division

9th Armored Division (United States)

9th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

9th Army (Soviet Union)

9th Division (Australia)

9th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

9th Infantry Division (India)

9th Infantry Division (Poland) (interwar)

9th Infantry Division (Soviet Union)

9th Infantry Division (United States)

9th Luftwaffe Field Division (Germany)

9th Motorized Division (France)

9th Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

9th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

9th Parachute Division (Germany)

9th SS Panzer Division Hohenstaufen

Juno Beach

Juno or Juno Beach was one of five beaches of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944 during the Second World War. The beach spanned from Courseulles, a village just east of the British beach Gold, to Saint-Aubin-sur-Mer, and just west of the British beach Sword. Taking Juno was the responsibility of the Canadian Army, with sea transport, mine sweeping, and a naval bombardment force provided by the Royal Canadian Navy and the British Royal Navy as well as elements from the Free French, Norwegian, and other Allied navies. The objectives of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division on D-Day were to cut the Caen-Bayeux road, seize the Carpiquet airport west of Caen, and form a link between the two British beaches on either flank.

The beach was defended by two battalions of the German 716th Infantry Division, with elements of the 21st Panzer Division held in reserve near Caen.

The invasion plan called for two brigades of the 3rd Canadian Division to land on two beach sectors—Mike and Nan—focusing on Courseulles, Bernières and Saint-Aubin. It was hoped that the preliminary naval and air bombardments would soften up the beach defences and destroy coastal strong points. Close support on the beaches was to be provided by amphibious tanks of the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade and specialized armoured vehicles of the 79th Armoured Division (United Kingdom). Once the landing zones were secured, the plan called for the 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade to land reserve battalions and deploy inland, the Royal Marine commandos to establish contact with the British 3rd Infantry Division on Sword and the 7th Canadian Infantry Brigade to link up with the British 50th Infantry Division on Gold. The 3rd Canadian Division's D-Day objectives were to capture Carpiquet Airfield and reach the Caen–Bayeux railway line by nightfall.

The landings initially encountered heavy resistance from the German 716th Division; the preliminary bombardment proved less effective than had been hoped, and rough weather forced the first wave to be delayed until 07:35. Several assault companies—notably those of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles and The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada—took heavy casualties in the opening minutes of the first wave. Strength of numbers, coordinated fire support from artillery and armoured squadrons, cleared most of the coastal defences within two hours of landing. The reserves of the 7th and 8th brigades began deploying at 08:30 (along with the Royal Marines), while the 9th Brigade began its deployment at 11:40.

The subsequent push inland towards Carpiquet and the Caen–Bayeux railway line achieved mixed results. The sheer numbers of men and vehicles on the beaches created lengthy delays between the landing of the 9th Brigade and the beginning of substantive attacks to the south. The 7th Brigade encountered heavy initial opposition before pushing south and making contact with the British 50th Division at Creully. The 8th Brigade encountered heavy resistance from a battalion of the 716th at Tailleville, while the 9th Brigade deployed towards Carpiquet early in the evening. Resistance in Saint-Aubin prevented the Royal Marines from establishing contact with the British 3rd Division on Sword. By the time all operations on the Anglo-Canadian front were ordered to halt at 21:00, The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada had reached its D-Day objective and the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division had succeeded in pushing farther inland than any other landing force on D-Day.

Siebe Gorman

Siebe Gorman & Company Ltd was a British company that developed diving equipment and breathing equipment and worked on commercial diving and marine salvage projects. The company advertised itself as 'Submarine Engineers'. It was founded by Augustus Siebe , a German-born British engineer chiefly known for his contributions to diving equipment.Siebe plc started in the 1970s as a continuation of Siebe Gorman when Siebe Gorman started to take over other firms, to mean the new conglomerate to distinguish it from Siebe Gorman's original breathing apparatus and diving gear core business. Siebe plc was once one of the United Kingdom's largest engineering businesses. It was a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index but in 1999 it merged with BTR plc to form Invensys. Invensys was taken over by the French multinational Schneider Electric for £3.4 billion in January 2014.

Divisions of the British Army

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