72nd Academy Awards

The 72nd Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored films released in 1999 and took place on March 26, 2000, at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, beginning at 5:30 p.m. PST / 8:30 p.m. EST. During the ceremony, the AMPAS presented Academy Awards (commonly referred to as Oscars) in 23 categories. The ceremony, televised in the United States by ABC, was produced by husband-and-wife producing team Richard and Lili Fini Zanuck and was directed by Louis J. Horvitz. Actor Billy Crystal hosted the show for the seventh time. He first presided over the 62nd ceremony held in 1990 and had last hosted the 70th ceremony held in 1998. Three weeks earlier in a ceremony at the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills, California held on March 4, the Academy Awards for Technical Achievement were presented by host Salma Hayek.[7]

American Beauty won five awards, including Best Picture.[8][9] Other winners included The Matrix with four awards, The Cider House Rules and Topsy-Turvy with two, and All About My Mother, Boys Don't Cry, Girl, Interrupted, King Gimp, My Mother Dreams the Satan's Disciples in New York, The Old Man and the Sea, One Day in September, The Red Violin, Sleepy Hollow, and Tarzan with one. The telecast garnered almost 47 million viewers in the United States.

72nd Academy Awards
72 academy awards poster
Official poster
DateMarch 26, 2000
SiteShrine Auditorium
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Hosted byBilly Crystal[1]
Preshow hostsTyra Banks
Chris Connelly
Meredith Vieira[2]
Produced byRichard D. Zanuck
Lili Fini Zanuck[3]
Directed byLouis J. Horvitz[4]
Highlights
Best PictureAmerican Beauty
Most awardsAmerican Beauty (5)
Most nominationsAmerican Beauty (8)
TV in the United States
NetworkABC
Duration4 hours, 9 minutes[5]
Ratings46.52 million
29.64% (Nielsen ratings)[6]

Winners and nominees

The nominees for the 72nd Academy Awards were announced on February 15, 2000, at 5:38 a.m. PST (13:38 UTC) at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills, California, by Robert Rehme, president of the Academy, and the actor Dustin Hoffman.[10] American Beauty received the most nominations with eight total; The Cider House Rules and The Insider tied for second with seven nominations each.[11]

The winners were announced during the awards ceremony on March 26, 2000.[12] Sam Mendes was the sixth person to win Best Director for his directorial debut.[13] Best Actor winner Kevin Spacey became the tenth performer to win acting Oscars in both lead and supporting categories.[14] By virtue of her father Jon Voight's Best Lead Actor win for 1978's Coming Home, Best Supporting Actress winner Angelina Jolie and Voight became the second father-daughter Oscar acting winners.[15]

Awards

Sam Mendes, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, 2013
Sam Mendes, Best Director winner
Kevin Spacey, May 2013
Kevin Spacey, Best Actor winner
Hilary Swank at 28th Tokyo International Film Festival
Hilary Swank, Best Actress winner
Michael Caine - Viennale 2012 g (cropped)
Michael Caine, Best Supporting Actor winner
Angelina Jolie 2 June 2014 (cropped)
Angelina Jolie, Best Supporting Actress winner
BALL Allan-24x30-2008b
Alan Ball, Best Original Screenplay winner
John Irving at Cologne 2010 (7108)
John Irving, Best Adapted Screenplay winner
Pedro Almodovar Césars 2017
Pedro Almodóvar, Best Foreign Language Film winner
Kevin Macdonald (cropped)
Kevin Macdonald, Best Documentary Feature co-winner

Winners are listed first, highlighted in boldface, and indicated with a double dagger (double-dagger).[16]

  • King Gimp – Susan Hannah Hadary and William A. Whiteforddouble-dagger
    • Eyewitness – Bert Van Bork
    • The Wildest Show in the South: The Angola Prison Rodeo – Simeon Soffer and Jonathan Stack

Academy Honorary Award

Irving G. Thalberg Award

Films with multiple nominations and awards

The following 17 films received multiple nominations:

Nominations Film
8
American Beauty
7 The Cider House Rules
The Insider
6
The Sixth Sense
5
The Talented Mr. Ripley
4 The Green Mile
The Matrix
Topsy-Turvy
3 Being John Malkovich
Magnolia
Sleepy Hollow
Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace
2 Anna and the King
Boys Don't Cry
The End of the Affair
Music of the Heart
Sweet and Lowdown

The following four films received multiple awards:

Awards Film
5
American Beauty
4
The Matrix
2 The Cider House Rules
Topsy-Turvy

Presenters and performers

The following individuals presented awards or performed musical numbers.[19]

Presenters (in order of appearance)

Name(s) Role
Peter Coyote Announcer for the 72nd annual Academy Awards
Robert Rehme (AMPAS president) Gave opening remarks welcoming guests to the awards ceremony
Drew Barrymore, Cameron Diaz & Lucy Liu Presenters of the award for Best Costume Design
Haley Joel Osment Presenter of the child actors tribute montage
Heather Graham & Mike Myers Presenters of the award for Best Sound
Erykah Badu & Tobey Maguire Presenters of the award for Best Makeup
Winona Ryder Presenter of the film The Cider House Rules on the Best Picture segment
James Coburn Presenter of the award for Best Supporting Actress
Morgan Freeman Presenter of the "200 Million Year History" movie segment
Cate Blanchett & Jude Law Presenters of the award for Best Live Action Short Film
Sheriff Woody, Buzz Lightyear, Jessie & Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Robots Presenters of the award for Best Animated Short Film
Samuel L. Jackson Presenter of the film The Green Mile on the Best Picture segment
LL Cool J & Vanessa Williams Introducers of the performances of the Best Original Song nominees
Cher Presenter of the award for Best Original Song
Wes Bentley, Thora Birch & Mena Suvari Presenters of the award Best Documentary Short Subject
Ethan Hawke & Uma Thurman Presenters of the award for Best Documentary Feature
Angela Bassett Presenter of the film The Sixth Sense on Best Picture segment
Judi Dench Presenter of the award for Best Supporting Actor
Jane Fonda Presenter of the Honorary Academy Award to Andrzej Wajda
Chow Yun-fat Presenter of the award Best Sound Effects Editing
Salma Hayek Presenter of the segment of the Academy Awards for Technical Achievement and the Gordon E. Sawyer Award
Arnold Schwarzenegger Presenter of the award for Best Visual Effects
Diane Keaton Presenter of the film American Beauty on the Best Picture segment
Antonio Banderas & Penélope Cruz Presenters of the award for Best Foreign Language Film
Keanu Reeves & Charlize Theron Presenters of the award for Best Original Score
Edward Norton Presenter of the In Memoriam tribute
Russell Crowe & Julianne Moore Presenters of the award for Best Art Direction
Tommy Lee Jones & Ashley Judd Presenters of the award for Best Film Editing
Jack Nicholson Presenter of the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award to Warren Beatty
Brad Pitt Presenter for the award for Best Cinematography
Kevin Spacey Presenter of the award for Best Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published
Mel Gibson Presenter of the award for Best Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen/Original Screenplay
Anjelica Huston Presenter of the film The Insider on the Best Picture segment
Roberto Benigni Presenter of the award for Best Actress
Gwyneth Paltrow Presenter of the award for Best Actor
Steven Spielberg Presenter of the award for Best Director
Clint Eastwood Presenter of the award for Best Picture

Performers (in order of appearance)

Name(s) Role Performed
Burt Bacharach
Rob Shrock
Don Was
Musical Arrangers Orchestral
Billy Crystal Performer Opening number:
The Green Mile (to the tune of "Green Acres theme song"),
The Sixth Sense (to the tune of "People" from Funny Girl),
The Insider (to the tune of Minute Waltz by Frédéric Chopin),
The Cider House Rules (to the tune of "Mame" from Mame), and
American Beauty (to the tune of "The Lady Is a Tramp" from Babes in Arms)[20]
Sarah McLachlan
Randy Newman
Performers "When She Loved Me" from Toy Story 2
Aimee Mann Performer "Save Me" from Magnolia
Phil Collins Performer "You'll Be in My Heart" from Tarzan
Gloria Estefan
'N Sync
Performers "Music of My Heart" from Music of the Heart
Robin Williams Performer "Blame Canada" from South Park: Bigger, Longer, and Uncut
Garth Brooks
Faith Hill
Ray Charles
Queen Latifah
Isaac Hayes
Burt Bacharach
Dionne Warwick
Performers "Everybody's Talkin'" from Midnight Cowboy,
"Over the Rainbow" from The Wizard of Oz,
"Secret Love" from Calamity Jane,
"The Man That Got Away" from A Star Is Born,
"I've Got You Under My Skin" from Born to Dance,
"All the Way" from The Joker Is Wild,
"Raindrops Keep Fallin' on My Head" from Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,
"Theme from Shaft" from Shaft,
"The Way We Were" from The Way We Were,
"When You Wish Upon a Star" from Pinocchio, and
"Alfie" from Alfie

Ceremony information

Billy Crystal VF 2012 Shankbone
Billy Crystal hosted the 72nd Academy Awards.

In view of the new millennium, the Academy sought to both shorten the telecast and give the ceremony a new look.[21][22] Husband–and–wife producers Richard D. Zanuck and Lili Fini Zanuck were recruited to oversee the production of the 2000 ceremony.[21] AMPAS President Robert Rehme explained the decision to hire the Zanucks saying, "With this new producing team in place, I look forward to a whole new perspective."[21] This marked the first occurrence that a woman was tapped for producing duties at the Oscars.[23] Despite Richard and Lili's promises to make changes to the ceremony, they hired actor and veteran Oscar host Billy Crystal to host the ceremony for the seventh time.[21]

Production of the ceremony was reported to be far more ambitious and extravagant than previous ceremonies.[24] Art director Bob Keene designed an ambitiously technological stage design for the telecast that used a floor adorned with flashing lights and several 35 foot columns consisting of high-definition video monitors stacked atop each other.[24] The columns were used to display images of previous Oscar appearances as presenters took the stage, nomination packages, and reaction shots of the acting nominees as the winner was being announced.[25] Because of serious technical challenges concerning movement, lighting, and overheating, Keene and his production design team tested the stage at ABC Prospect Studios before installing it at the Shrine Auditorium.[26]

Several other people were involved in the production of the ceremony. Actor Peter Coyote, who served as announcer for the telecast, was often seen before commercial breaks live behind the stage.[25][27] Musical directors Burt Bacharach, Don Was, and Rob Shrock composed a techno-pop soundtrack that substituted for a live orchestra during most of the ceremony.[21][28] In addition, Bacharach rounded up musicians that included Garth Brooks, Queen Latifah, and Dionne Warwick to perform a medley of songs previously nominated for Best Original Song.[29] Choreographer Kenny Ortega supervised the "Blame Canada" musical number.[30]

Box office performance of nominees

At the time of the nominations announcement on February 15, the combined gross of the five Best Picture nominees was $521 million with an average of $104 million per film.[31] The Sixth Sense was the highest earner among the Best Picture nominees with $278.4 million in domestic box office receipts.[31] The film was followed by The Green Mile ($120.7 million), American Beauty ($74.7 million), The Cider House Rules ($20.7 million), and finally The Insider ($26.6 million).[31]

Of the top 50 grossing movies of the year, 37 nominations went to 11 films on the list.[32] Only The Sixth Sense (2nd), The Green Mile (13th), The Talented Mr. Ripley (26th), and American Beauty (27th) were nominated for directing, acting, screenwriting, or Best Picture. The other top 50 box office hits that earned the nominations were Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Mence (1st), Toy Story 2 (3rd), The Matrix (5th), Tarzan (6th), The Mummy (8th), Stuart Little (11th), and Sleepy Hollow (20th).[32]

Missing paper ballots

Nearly two weeks before Oscar voting was finished, AMPAS reported that 4,000 of the ballots mailed to Academy members were missing. The bags that carried the ballots were mislabeled as third-class mail.[33] On March 6, 2000, 1,000 of the ballots were discovered at a US Postal Service regional distribution center in Bell, California.[34] In response to affected members, AMPAS sent replacement ballots sealed in yellow envelopes, and extended the voting deadline by two days to March 23.[35]

Oscar statuettes theft

On March 10, 2000, 55 Oscar statuettes were stolen from a Roadway Express loading dock in Bell, California.[35][36] In the event the stolen awards were to be still missing during the festivities, AMPAS announced that R.S. Owens & Company, the manufacturer of the awards would produce a new batch of the golden statuettes.[37] Nine days later, 52 of the stolen statuettes were discovered in a trash bin at a Food 4 Less supermarket located in the Koreatown neighborhood of Los Angeles by a man named Willie Fulgear.[38][39] For the safe recovery of the stolen statuettes, Roadway Express rewarded Fulgear with $50,000, and the Academy invited him and his son Allen to the ceremony.[40] Two Roadway Express employees, truck driver Lawrence Ledent and dock worker Anthony Hart, were arrested for the theft of the Oscars. Both men pleaded no contest. Lawrence served six months in prison and Anthony received probation. A third man who was Mr. Fulgear's half-brother was initially charged with the crime, but police dropped those charges after Mr. Fulgear divulged that they were estranged from each other.[38][41] Three years later, one of three remaining missing Oscar statuettes was discovered during a drug bust at a mansion in Miami, Florida; the other two have yet to be found.[42]

Critical reviews

The show received a positive reception from most media publications. Television critic Monica Collins of the Boston Herald praised producers Richard and Lili Fini Zanuck for overseeing a show that was "clean, snappy, high-gloss and very well produced." She also quipped that host Billy Crystal did not need to save the show this time because "everything seemed to come together.[43] The San Francisco Examiner's Wesley Morris wrote "the show was downright hip, more so than it's been in decades." He also gave high marks for the "techno-chic" production elements from the music and stage design.[44] Columnist Paul Brownfield of the Los Angeles Times raved that "the 72nd annual Academy Awards telecast was hipper than in years past, sleeker in look and edgier in tone." He added that Crystal was "the perfect antidote to the entire evening's self-serious posturing."[45]

Some media outlets were more critical of the show. John Carman of the San Francisco Chronicle lamented that despite being solid and tidy, "the show never quite managed the big surprises, sloppy excesses and emotional highs we hope to see."[46] Pittsburgh Post-Gazette television critic Rob Owen criticized the uneven pacing of the ceremony writing that the telecast "started slowly – 20 minutes of Billy Crystal's spoofs and singing that weren't as funny as his past Oscar intros – and never got up to speed."[47] Caryn James of The New York Times remarked that "the four-hour show turned into a zombie." She also stated that the telecast was bloated with too many tributes to Hollywood's past.[48]

Ratings and reception

The American telecast on ABC drew in an average of 46.52 million viewers over its length, which was a 3% increase from the previous year's ceremony.[6] An estimated 79.11 million total viewers watched all or part of the awards.[6] The show also drew higher Nielsen ratings compared to the previous ceremony with 29.64% of households watching over a 48.32 share.[49] In addition, it also drew a higher 18–49 demo rating with a 19.86 rating over a 39.34 share among viewers in that demographic.[49]

In July 2000, the show received nine nominations at the 52nd Primetime Emmy Awards.[50] Two months later, the ceremony won one of those nominations for Louis J. Horvitz's direction of the telecast.[51]

In Memoriam

The annual In Memoriam tribute, presented by actor Edward Norton, honored the following people.[52]

See also

References

  1. ^ Chapman, Francesca (December 15, 1999). "They Wanted Billy, So He'll Play Host To Oscars Again". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia Media Network. Archived from the original on January 16, 2014. Retrieved July 13, 2013.
  2. ^ Owen, Rob (March 26, 2000). "Audience can share Meredith Vieira's view from the red carpet". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Block Communications. Archived from the original on October 19, 2012. Retrieved June 27, 2013.
  3. ^ King, Susan (February 16, 2000). "Making the Oscar Ceremony a Reflection of Today's Films". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Publishing. Archived from the original on October 22, 2013. Retrieved June 26, 2013.
  4. ^ "72nd Annual Academy Awards-Full Production Credits". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved July 6, 2013.
  5. ^ Speier, Michael (March 25, 2000). "Review: "The 72nd Annual Academy Awards"". Variety. Penske Media Corporation. Archived from the original on October 23, 2013. Retrieved July 1, 2013.
  6. ^ a b c Braxton, Greg (March 28, 2000). "Some Oscar Questions Linger: Like, Where Was Whitney?". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Publishing. Archived from the original on October 22, 2013. Retrieved June 27, 2013.
  7. ^ "Oscar Watch: Hayek to present Scientific and Technical Awards". Variety. Penske Media Corporation. February 13, 2000. Archived from the original on October 14, 2013. Retrieved July 6, 2013.
  8. ^ Lyman, Rick (March 27, 2000). "'American Beauty' Tops the Oscars; Main Acting Awards Go to Kevin Spacey and Hilary Swank". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved June 27, 2013.
  9. ^ Brooks, Xan (March 27, 2000). "Oscar ceremony sticks to the script". The Daily Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Archived from the original on October 14, 2013. Retrieved July 6, 2013.
  10. ^ Svetkey, Benjamin. "And Then There Were 5". Entertainment Weekly. Time Warner. Archived from the original on June 3, 2013. Retrieved May 6, 2013.
  11. ^ Ryan, Desmond (February 16, 2000). "Eight Oscar Nominations For 'American Beauty'". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia Media Network. Archived from the original on October 5, 2013. Retrieved July 6, 2013.
  12. ^ "Oscar winners in full". BBC News. BBC. March 27, 2000. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved July 5, 2013.
  13. ^ Lyttelton, Oliver (February 20, 2013). "Oscar Trivia: 50 Fun Facts To Prepare You For The 85th Academy Awards". IndieWire. Snagfilms. Archived from the original on March 30, 2013. Retrieved July 5, 2013.
  14. ^ "The 72nd Academy Awards (2000)". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. AMPAS. Archived from the original on November 7, 2011. Retrieved November 19, 2011.
  15. ^ Levy 2003, p. 126
  16. ^ "Nominees & Winners for the 72nd Academy Awards". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Archived from the original on November 9, 2014. Retrieved January 3, 2014.
  17. ^ Hornaday, Ann (March 27, 2000). "A 'Beauty' of an Evening". The Baltimore Sun. Tribune Publishing. Archived from the original on October 15, 2013. Retrieved July 8, 2013.
  18. ^ Zacharek, Stephanie (March 20, 2000). "Warren Beatty". Salon. Salon Media Group. Archived from the original on May 1, 2014. Retrieved July 22, 2013.
  19. ^ Bona 2002, p. 295
  20. ^ Bona 2002, pp. 300–301
  21. ^ a b c d e Bona 2002, p. 279
  22. ^ Pond 2005, p. 224
  23. ^ Snow, Shauna (December 11, 1999). "Arts And Entertainment Reports From The Times, News Services And The Nation's Press". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Publishing. Archived from the original on October 15, 2013. Retrieved July 6, 2013.
  24. ^ a b Pond 2005, p. 225
  25. ^ a b Bona 2002, p. 301
  26. ^ Pond 2005, p. 235
  27. ^ Ryan, Joal (December 10, 1999). "Taps for Oscar Night Taps". E!. NBCUniversal. Archived from the original on October 15, 2013. Retrieved July 5, 2013.
  28. ^ Pond 2005, pp. 238–239
  29. ^ Burlingame, Jon (March 20, 2000). "The Sound of Change". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Publishing. Archived from the original on October 15, 2013. Retrieved July 6, 2013.
  30. ^ Bona 2002, p. 285
  31. ^ a b c "1999 Academy Award Nominations and Winner for Best Picture". Box Office Mojo. Amazon.com. Archived from the original on August 9, 2013. Retrieved July 8, 2013.
  32. ^ a b "1999 Domestic Grosses". Box Office Mojo. Amazon.com. Archived from the original on March 10, 2014. Retrieved March 2, 2014.
  33. ^ Pond 2005, p. 231
  34. ^ Ryfle, Steve (March 19, 2000). "Oscar Ballots: Lost... And Found!". Hollywood.com. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved July 8, 2013.
  35. ^ a b Bona 2002, p. 289
  36. ^ "Oscars stolen, but the show will go on". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. March 17, 2000. Archived from the original on October 15, 2013. Retrieved July 8, 2013.
  37. ^ Ryan, Joal; Steven Ryfle (March 19, 2000). "Oscar: Found in Trash!". Hollywood.com. Hollywood.com, LLC. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved July 25, 2013.
  38. ^ a b Pond 2005, p. 255
  39. ^ Lyman, Rick (March 21, 2000). "Stolen Oscars Discovered in a Trash Bin". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Archived from the original on June 3, 2013. Retrieved July 8, 2013.
  40. ^ "Man Who Rescued Oscars Receives $50,000 Reward". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Publishing. March 24, 2000. Archived from the original on October 23, 2013. Retrieved July 8, 2013.
  41. ^ "3rd Man Charged in Oscar Theft". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Publishing. October 17, 2000. Archived from the original on October 23, 2013. Retrieved July 8, 2013.
  42. ^ "September 10, 2013". Chicago Tribune. Tribune Publishing. June 14, 2003. Archived from the original on June 6, 2015. Retrieved October 18, 2014.
  43. ^ Bona 2002, p. 314
  44. ^ Morris, Wesley (March 27, 2000). "An 'American' tale". The San Francisco Examiner. Hearst Corporation. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved June 27, 2013.
  45. ^ Brownfield, Paul (March 27, 2000). "Hipper, Sleeker but Longer". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Publishing. Archived from the original on October 23, 2013. Retrieved July 2, 2013.
  46. ^ Carman, John (March 27, 2000). "The Show – Onstage and Off / TV Oscarcast Was Efficient, Lacked Emotion". San Francisco Chronicle. Hearst Corporation. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved July 2, 2013.
  47. ^ Owen, Rob (March 27, 2000). "Crystal just ho-hum in a really slow Oscars show". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Crain Communications. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved July 2, 2013.
  48. ^ James, Caryn (March 28, 2000). "CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK; Growing Pains as the Oscars Play to Jaded Stargazers". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved July 5, 2013.
  49. ^ a b "Academy Awards ratings" (PDF). Television Bureau of Advertising. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 15, 2013. Retrieved June 27, 2013.
  50. ^ "Primetime Emmy Award database". Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. ATAS. Archived from the original on June 23, 2013. Retrieved July 6, 2013.
  51. ^ "List of Emmy winners". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Gannett Company. September 11, 2000. Retrieved July 6, 2013.
  52. ^ Bona 2002, p. 307

Bibliography

  • Bona, Damien (2002), Inside Oscar 2, New York, United States: Ballantine Books, ISBN 0-345-44970-3
  • Levy, Emanuel (2003), All About Oscar: The History and Politics of the Academy Awards, New York, United States: Continuum International Publishing Group, ISBN 0-8264-1452-4
  • Pond, Steve (2005), The Big Show: High Times and Dirty Dealings Backstage at the Academy Awards, New York, United States: Faber and Faber, ISBN 0-571-21193-3

External links

Official websites
News resources
Analysis
Christine Blundell

Christine Blundell (born October, 1961) is a British make-up artist who won an Academy Award in the category of Best Makeup during the 72nd Academy Awards. She won for the film Topsy-Turvy. Her win was shared with Trefor Proud.She has over 50 credits since her start in 1990 as well as a make-up academy based in Camden, the Christine Blundell Make-Up Acacdemy (CBMA).

Crimson Alberta Ferretti dress of Uma Thurman

The Crimson Alberta Ferretti dress of Uma Thurman refers to the crimson Alberta Ferretti dress worn by Uma Thurman at the 72nd Academy Awards on March 26, 2000. In a poll by Debenhams published in The Daily Telegraph the dress was voted the 20th greatest red carpet gown of all time.The dress remains among the most iconic dresses worn at the Academy Awards.

Dane Davis

Dane Davis is a sound editor with over 150 film credits. He won the Academy Award for Best Sound Editing during the 72nd Academy Awards for The Matrix.He is most known for his work on The Matrix films. With the exception of Cloud Atlas, he has worked on all the films by The Wachowskis and their TV series, Sense8.

He is the president of Danetracks Studios.

From the Edge of the City

From the Edge of the City (Greek: Από την άκρη της πόλης, translit. Apo tin akri tis polis) is a 1998 Greek film directed by Constantinos Giannaris. It was Greece's official Best Foreign Language Film submission at the 72nd Academy Awards, but did not manage to receive a nomination.

Glue Sniffer

Glue Sniffer (Spanish: Huelepega: Ley de la calle) is a 1999 Spanish-language film directed by Elia Schneider. It was an international co-production between Spain and Venezuela. It was Venezuela's official Best Foreign Language Film submission at the 72nd Academy Awards, but did not manage to receive a nomination.

Jon Thum

Jon Thum is a visual effects artist. He contributed work on The Matrix and The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian. As a supervisor at Prime Focus World in 2012, he led a 70-person team of artists to produce 650 visual effects shots for Dredd 3D.

List of submissions to the 72nd Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film

The Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film was created in 1956 by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to honour non-English-speaking films produced outside the United States. The award is handed out annually, and is accepted by the winning film's director, although it is considered an award for the submitting country as a whole. Countries are invited by the Academy to submit their best films for competition according to strict rules, with only one film being accepted from each country.For the 72nd Academy Awards, the Academy invited 75 countries to submit films for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. The submission deadline was set on November 1, 1999. Forty-seven countries submitted films to the Academy, surpassing the record set in 1994. The Asian nations of Bhutan, Nepal and Tajikistan submitted films for the first time ever. The nominations were announced on February 15, 2000, and the winner was revealed during the awards presentation held on March 26, 2000. Belgium's submission Rosetta was not nominated, even though it had received the prestigious Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival the previous year. Nepal received its first and so far only nomination for Caravan, a film made in the Tibetan language, which is spoken in parts of Nepal, about the country's now disappearing salt-trade system. The four other nominated films came from France, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The latter received its nomination for Solomon and Gaenor, the first film made entirely in Welsh and Yiddish. Spain eventually won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film for Pedro Almodóvar's All About My Mother. It was the country's third win after Volver a Empezar (To Begin Again) in 1982 and Belle Époque in 1993. Almodóvar dedicated the award to the Spanish people and to Spain, and had to be dragged from the stage after an overlong speech in which he thanked numerous saints and relatives.

Lover's Grief over the Yellow River

Lover's Grief over the Yellow River (simplified Chinese: 黄河绝恋; traditional Chinese: 黃河絕戀; pinyin: Húanghé júeliàn) is a 1999 Chinese film directed by Feng Xiaoning. It was China's official Best Foreign Language Film submission at the 72nd Academy Awards, but did not receive a nomination. Feng considers it the second of his "War and Peace" (战争与和平) trilogy.

Mike Smithson (make-up artist)

Mike Smithson is an American make-up artist who has over 80 credits to him. He has done films such as Men in Black III, Star Trek, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Avatar and Lincoln among many other big named films.

One of his first jobs was on the Disneyland 3D attraction Captain EO.

He received an Oscar nomination during the 72nd Academy Awards for the film Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me in the category of Best Makeup. He shared the nomination with Michèle Burke.He also won an Emmy Award for the TV show Gilmore Girls, which he was previously nominated for Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.

My Mother Dreams the Satan's Disciples in New York

My Mother Dreams the Satan's Disciples in New York is a 1999 short film directed by Barbara Schock. It was made as a thesis film for the AFI Conservatory. In 2000, it won an Oscar at the 72nd Academy Awards for Best Live Action Short Film.

One Day in September

One Day in September is a 1999 documentary film directed by Kevin Macdonald examining the 5 September 1972 murder of 11 Israeli athletes at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, Germany. Michael Douglas provides the sparse narration throughout the film.

The film won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature at the 72nd Academy Awards, on March 26, 2000, for films made in 1999.

Poppoya

Poppoya (鉄道員, Poppoya / Tetsudōin, "Railwayman") is a 1999 Japanese film directed by Yasuo Furuhata. It was Japan's submission to the 72nd Academy Awards for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, but was not accepted as a nominee. It was chosen as Best Film at the Japan Academy Prize ceremony. The film was the third-highest-grossing film of the year in Japan.

Solomon

Solomon (; Hebrew: שְׁלֹמֹה, Shlomoh), also called Jedidiah (Hebrew יְדִידְיָהּ Yedidyah), was, according to the Hebrew Bible, Old Testament, Quran, and Hadiths, a fabulously wealthy and wise king of Israel who succeeded his father, King David. The conventional dates of Solomon's reign are circa 970 to 931 BCE, normally given in alignment with the dates of David's reign. He is described as the third king of the United Monarchy, which would break apart into the northern Kingdom of Israel and the southern Kingdom of Judah shortly after his death. Following the split, his patrilineal descendants ruled over Judah alone.

According to the Talmud, Solomon is one of the 48 prophets. In the Quran, he is considered a major prophet, and Muslims generally refer to him by the Arabic variant Sulayman, son of David.

The Hebrew Bible credits him as the builder of the First Temple in Jerusalem, beginning in the fourth year of his reign, using the vast wealth he and his father had accumulated. He dedicated the temple to Yahweh, the God of Israel. He is portrayed as great in wisdom, wealth and power beyond either of the previous kings of the country, but also as a king who sinned. His sins included idolatry, marrying foreign women and, ultimately, turning away from Yahweh, and they led to the kingdom's being torn in two during the reign of his son Rehoboam.

Solomon is the subject of many other later references and legends, most notably in the 1st-century apocryphal work known as the Testament of Solomon. In the New Testament, he is portrayed as a teacher of wisdom excelled by Jesus, and as arrayed in glory, but excelled by "the lilies of the field". In later years, in mostly non-biblical circles, Solomon also came to be known as a magician and an exorcist, with numerous amulets and medallion seals dating from the Hellenistic period invoking his name.

Steve Courtley

Steve Courtley is an Australian special effects artist who is most known for his work in The Matrix films.

He won at the 72nd Academy Awards for his work on The Matrix in the category of Best Visual Effects. His Oscar was shared with John Gaeta, Janek Sirrs and Jon Thum.He started his work on Australian films, such as Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior.

The Idiot Returns

The Idiot Returns (Czech: Návrat idiota) is a 1999 Czech film directed by Saša Gedeon. It was the Czech Republic's submission to the 72nd Academy Awards for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, but was not accepted as a nominee.

The Lord's Lantern in Budapest

The Lord's Lantern in Budapest (Hungarian: Nekem lámpást adott kezembe az Úr Pesten) is a 1999 Hungarian film directed by Miklós Jancsó. It was Hungary's official Best Foreign Language Film submission at the 72nd Academy Awards, but did not manage to receive a nomination.

Time Out (1998 film)

Time Out (Spanish: Golpe de estadio) is a 1998 Colombian film directed by Sergio Cabrera. It was an international co-production between Italy, Spain and Colombia. It was Colombia's official Best Foreign Language Film submission at the 72nd Academy Awards, but did not manage to receive a nomination.

Trefor Proud

Trefor Proud is a make-up artist who trained at Delamar Academy of Make-up & Hair, London. He won an Academy Award in the category of Best Makeup during the 72nd Academy Awards. He won for the film Topsy-Turvy. He shared his win with Christine Blundell.He also has won two Emmy awards, for The Courageous Heart of Irena Sendler and John Adams.

He has worked on over 50 films and TV shows. Which include Gladiator, Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace, The Gospel of John and Ender's Game. He also did several episodes of NCIS: Los Angeles.

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