69th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 69th Primetime Emmy Awards honored the best in U.S. prime time television programming from June 1, 2016 until May 31, 2017, as chosen by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. The ceremony was held on Sunday, September 17, 2017 at the Microsoft Theater in Downtown Los Angeles, California, and was broadcast in the U.S. by CBS. The ceremony was hosted by Stephen Colbert.[1] The 69th Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards were held on September 9 and 10, and was broadcast by FXX on September 16.[3]

The nominations were announced by Anna Chlumsky and Shemar Moore on July 13, 2017.[4] Channelwise, the freshman HBO science fiction western drama Westworld and NBC sketch comedy Saturday Night Live were the most nominated programs, each with 22 nominations.[5][6]

Host Stephen Colbert opened the ceremony with a song-and-dance number and a monologue that lampooned the state of the world under President Donald Trump, which The New York Times said set an anti-Trump tone for the rest of the event.[7] Many of the further presentations and host commentary continued jokes aimed towards Trump, along with winners' speeches criticizing the President and standing behind diversity in the television field.[8] Sean Spicer, Trump's former White House Press Secretary, made an appearance in which he parodied himself.[7] RuPaul played a living Emmy statue in a comedic interview segment with Colbert during the ceremony.[9][10]

Original programming web television services—Netflix and Hulu—upended traditional broadcast television series in several categories. Netflix series earned a total of 20 Primetime Emmy Awards, following only HBO with 29 and leading NBC with 15.[11][12] Hulu's The Handmaid's Tale became the first web series to win Outstanding Drama Series.[13] Additionally, web television also won their first awards for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series (Elisabeth Moss for The Handmaid's Tale – Hulu), Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series (Alexis Bledel for The Handmaid's Tale – Hulu),[note 1] Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series (Bruce Miller for The Handmaid's Tale – Hulu), Outstanding Television Movie (Black Mirror: San Junipero – Netflix), and Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special (Charlie Brooker for Black Mirror: San Junipero – Netflix).

In addition, the night saw several other historic firsts: Donald Glover became the first African-American to win Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series for Atlanta.[14] Riz Ahmed, with his win for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie for The Night Of, became the first Asian to win that category as well as the first South Asian male to win an acting award and first South Asian to win a lead acting award.[15][16] Moreover, Ahmed and Dave Chappelle also became the first Muslims to win acting awards, with Ahmed being the first Muslim to win a lead acting award and Chappelle the first to win for a guest role for Saturday Night Live.[17] With Aziz Ansari and Lena Waithe winning Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series for Master of None, Waithe became the first African-American female to win that award.[18] Finally, Julia Louis-Dreyfus won her record sixth consecutive award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series for the same category for the same role in a single series as Selina Meyer on Veep; she is now tied with Cloris Leachman for the most wins as a performer.[19]

The awards ceremony drew 11.4 million viewers, on par with the previous awards ceremony, but one of the lowest viewerships for the Primetime Emmy Awards overall. Analysts attribute this to younger audiences preferring to watch clips or summaries than the entire event[20] and to Florida markets being affected by Hurricane Irma.[21]

69th Primetime Emmy Awards
The 69th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards Poster
Promotional poster
Date
LocationMicrosoft Theater,
Los Angeles, California[2]
Presented byAcademy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted byStephen Colbert
Most awardsComedy: Saturday Night Live (4)
Drama: The Handmaid's Tale (5)
Limited / Movie: Big Little Lies (5)
Most nominationsComedy: Veep (10)
Drama: The Handmaid's Tale / Westworld (7)
Limited / Movie: Feud: Bette and Joan (10)
Television/radio coverage
NetworkCBS [1]
Produced byStephen Colbert
Ricky Kirshner
Chris Licht
Glenn Weiss

Winners and nominees

Winners are listed first and highlighted in bold.[22][23]

Donald Glover TIFF 2015
Donald Glover, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Julia Louis-Dreyfus VF 2012 Shankbone 3
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series winner
Sterling K. Brown Paleyfest
Sterling K. Brown, Outstanding Lead Actor in Drama Series winner
Elisabeth Moss at PaleyFest 2014
Elisabeth Moss, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winner
Riz Ahmed performing at Occupy London NYE Party 2011
Riz Ahmed, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie winner
Nicole Kidman Cannes 2017 2
Nicole Kidman, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie winner
Alec Baldwin by Gage Skidmore
Alec Baldwin, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Kate McKinnon 2018 (cropped)
Kate McKinnon, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series winner
John Lithgow 8 by David Shankbone
John Lithgow, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series winner
Ann Dowd 2016 (cropped)
Ann Dowd, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winner
Alexander Skarsgard (29485267411) (cropped)
Alexander Skarsgård, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie winner
Laura Dern Deauville 2017
Laura Dern, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie winner

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety Talk Series Outstanding Variety Sketch Series
Outstanding Limited Series Outstanding Television Movie
Outstanding Reality-Competition Program

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Kate McKinnon as Various Characters on Saturday Night Live (Episode: "Host: Dave Chappelle") (NBC)
    • Vanessa Bayer as Various Characters on Saturday Night Live (Episode: "Host: Dwayne Johnson") (NBC)
    • Anna Chlumsky as Amy Brookheimer on Veep (Episode: "Groundbreaking") (HBO)
    • Kathryn Hahn as Raquel Fein on Transparent (Episode: "Life Sucks and Then You Die") (Amazon)
    • Leslie Jones as Various Characters on Saturday Night Live (Episode: "Host: Tom Hanks") (NBC)
    • Judith Light as Shelly Pfefferman on Transparent (Episode: "Exciting and New") (Amazon)
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie

Directing

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
  • Atlanta (Episode: "B.A.N."), Directed by Donald Glover (FX)
    • Silicon Valley (Episode: "Intellectual Property"), Directed by Jamie Babbit (HBO)
    • Silicon Valley (Episode: "Server Error"), Directed by Mike Judge (HBO)
    • Veep (Episode: "Blurb"), Directed by Morgan Sackett (HBO)
    • Veep (Episode: "Justice"), Directed by Dale Stern (HBO)
    • Veep (Episode: "Groundbreaking"), Directed by David Mandel (HBO)
Outstanding Directing for a Variety Series Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special

Writing

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special

Most major nominations

By network[note 2]
  • HBO – 46
  • FX / Netflix – 27
  • NBC – 17
  • ABC – 11
  • CBS / Hulu – 7
  • Showtime – 6
  • AMC – 5
  • TBS – 4
  • Amazon – 3
By program
  • Feud: Bette and Joan (FX) / Veep (HBO) – 10
  • Big Little Lies (HBO) / The Night Of (HBO) – 8
  • The Handmaid's Tale (Hulu) / Saturday Night Live (NBC) / Westworld (HBO) – 7
  • Fargo (FX) – 6
  • Atlanta (FX) / Better Call Saul (AMC) / The Crown (Netflix) / Stranger Things (Netflix) / This Is Us (NBC) – 5
  • Full Frontal with Samantha Bee (TBS) / House of Cards (Netflix) / Silicon Valley (HBO) – 4
  • The Americans (FX) / Black-ish (ABC) / Genius (NatGeo) / Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO) / The Late Show with Stephen Colbert (CBS) / Master of None (Netflix) / Transparent (Amazon) / Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (Netflix) / The Wizard of Lies (HBO) – 3

Most major awards

By network[note 2]
  • HBO – 10
  • NBC – 6
  • Hulu – 5
  • Netflix – 4
  • FX – 2
By program
  • Big Little Lies (HBO) / The Handmaid's Tale (Hulu) – 5
  • Saturday Night Live (NBC) – 4
  • Atlanta (FX) / Black Mirror: San Junipero (Netflix) / Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO) / Veep (HBO) – 2

Presenters and performers

The awards were presented by the following:[24][25][26]

Presenters

Name(s) Role
Jermaine Fowler Announcer for the 69th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards
Laura Dern
Nicole Kidman
Zoë Kravitz
Reese Witherspoon
Shailene Woodley
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series
Shemar Moore
Gina Rodriguez
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Riz Ahmed
Issa Rae
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie
Dave Chappelle
Melissa McCarthy
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series
Anna Faris
Allison Janney
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Variety Sketch Series
LL Cool J
Gabrielle Union
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
James Corden
Seth Meyers
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series
Alexis Bledel
Gerald McRaney
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special
Jane Fonda
Dolly Parton
Lily Tomlin
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie
Kaitlin Olson
Tracee Ellis Ross
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series
Sonequa Martin-Green
Jeremy Piven
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Hayma Washington Introducer of a special presentation highlighting diversity and inclusion in television
Iain Armitage
Jim Parsons
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series
Lea Michele
Kumail Nanjiani
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Reality-Competition Program
Mark Feuerstein
Rashida Jones
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
Seth MacFarlane
Emmy Rossum
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special
Viola Davis Presenter of the In Memoriam tribute
Craig Robinson
Adam Scott
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Directing for a Variety Series
Anthony Anderson
Priyanka Chopra
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Variety Talk Series
Alec Baldwin
Edie Falco
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series
Chris Hardwick
Debra Messing
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Carol Burnett
Norman Lear
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Comedy Series
Jessica Biel
Joseph Fiennes
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie
Jason Bateman
Sarah Paulson
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie
Matt Bomer
BD Wong
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Television Movie
Anika Noni Rose
Cicely Tyson
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Limited Series
Dennis Quaid
Kyra Sedgwick
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
Tatiana Maslany
Jeffrey Dean Morgan
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Oprah Winfrey Presenter of the award for Outstanding Drama Series

Performers

Name(s) Performed
Stephen Colbert
Chance the Rapper
Millie Bobby Brown
Julia Louis-Dreyfus
Tony Hale
Keri Russell
Matthew Rhys
"Everything is Better on TV"
Christopher Jackson "As"

In Memoriam

Broadway actor Christopher Jackson performed Stevie Wonder's "As" as images of television personalities who died in the past year were shown in the following order.[27]

Notes

  1. ^ Awarded the weekend before at the Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards
  2. ^ a b "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

References

  1. ^ a b c d Koblin, John (January 23, 2017). "Stephen Colbert Will Host the Emmy Awards". The New York Times. Retrieved January 23, 2017.
  2. ^ "Stephen Colbert to Host the 69th Emmy Awards" (Press release). Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. January 23, 2017. Retrieved January 23, 2017.
  3. ^ "Emmy nominations 2017: the full list". Vox. July 13, 2017. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  4. ^ "Anna Chlumsky and Shemar Moore to Announce Emmy Nominations" (Press release). Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. June 29, 2017. Retrieved June 29, 2017.
  5. ^ Otterson, Joe (July 13, 2017). "Westworld: Inside HBO Drama's Long Journey to 22 Emmy Nominations". Variety. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  6. ^ "Emmys 2017: Full List of Nominations". Variety. July 13, 2017. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  7. ^ a b "The Best and Worst Moments of the 2017 Emmys". The New York Times. September 18, 2017. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  8. ^ Holloway, Daniel (September 18, 2017). "Emmys: Diversity Reigns Over Trump as Big Little Lies, Handmaid's Tale, SNL Dominate". Variety. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  9. ^ Shanley, Patrick (September 17, 2017). "RuPaul Plays a Living Emmy Statue In Colbert Sketch". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  10. ^ Lawrence, Derek (September 18, 2017). "RuPaul Plays 'Emmy' in Exclusive Interview with Stephen Colbert". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  11. ^ "Hulu's big Emmy night marks a streaming milestone". CNBC. Reuters. September 18, 2017. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  12. ^ Bishop, Byran (September 18, 2017). "Hulu's Emmy wins mark its emergence as a major entertainment player". The Verge. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  13. ^ Stanhope, Kate. "The Handmaid's Tale Wins Big for Hulu at Emmys". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  14. ^ "Donald Glover Is First Black Director To Win An Emmy In Comedy". HuffPost. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  15. ^ Vincent, Alice (September 18, 2017). "Riz Ahmed makes history as the first Muslim man to win an acting Emmy". The Daily Telegraph.
  16. ^ "Riz Ahmed makes history as the first South Asian man to win an Emmy acting award". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  17. ^ "Riz Ahmed Is The First Muslim & South-Asian Emmy-Winning Actor Ever". Bustle. September 18, 2017. Retrieved September 20, 2017.
  18. ^ "Lena Waithe Makes Emmy History as First Black Woman to Win for Comedy Writing". Variety. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  19. ^ "Julia Louis-Dreyfus Makes Emmy History With Sixth Veep Lead Actress Win". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  20. ^ Battaglio, Stephen (September 18, 2017). "Emmy Awards draw 11.4 million viewers to CBS telecast, even with last year". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  21. ^ Gunderman, Dan (September 18, 2017). "Emmys get worst all-time ratings in hurricane-affected markets". Daily News. Retrieved September 20, 2017.
  22. ^ "Emmys winners 2017: the full list" (PDF). The Guardian. September 17, 2017. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  23. ^ "Emmys 2017 Winners List". The New York Times. September 17, 2017. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  24. ^ Rodriguez, Karla (September 7, 2017). "Emmys 2017: Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, Anna Faris and More Stars Set to Present". Us Weekly. Retrieved September 9, 2017.
  25. ^ "First Presenters Announced for 69th Emmy Awards" (Press release). Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. September 6, 2017. Retrieved September 9, 2017.
  26. ^ "More Top Talent to Present at the Emmy Awards" (Press release). Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. September 13, 2017. Retrieved September 13, 2017.
  27. ^ Beachum, Chris (September 13, 2017). "Emmys 2017: In Memoriam to honor Mary Tyler Moore, Jerry Lewis, Don Rickles and at least 50 more TV legends". Gold Derby.

External links

13th (film)

13th is a 2016 American documentary by director Ava DuVernay. The film explores the "intersection of race, justice, and mass incarceration in the United States;" it is titled after the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, adopted in 1865, which abolished slavery throughout the United States and ended involuntary servitude except as a punishment for conviction of a crime.

DuVernay contends that slavery has been perpetuated since the end of the American Civil War through criminalizing behavior and enabling police to arrest poor freedmen and force them to work for the state under convict leasing; suppression of African Americans by disenfranchisement, lynchings and Jim Crow; politicians declaring a war on drugs that weigh more heavily on minority communities and, by the late 20th century, mass incarceration of people of color in the United States. She examines the prison-industrial complex and the emerging detention-industrial complex, discussing how much money is being made by corporations from such incarcerations.

13th garnered acclaim from a number of film critics. It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature at the 89th Academy Awards, and won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Documentary or Nonfiction Special at the 69th Primetime Emmy Awards. On the other hand, New York magazine film critic David Edelstein writing in Vulture noted: "You’d think from 13th that crime didn’t exist."

2017 Emmy Awards

2017 Emmy Awards may refer to:

69th Primetime Emmy Awards, the 2017 Emmy Awards ceremony honoring primetime programming during June 2016 – May 2017

44th Daytime Emmy Awards, the 2017 Emmy Awards ceremony honoring daytime programming during 2016

45th International Emmy Awards, the 2017 ceremony honoring international programming

70th Tony Awards

The 70th Annual Tony Awards were held on June 12, 2016, to recognize achievement in Broadway productions during the 2015–16 season. The ceremony temporarily returned to the Beacon Theatre in New York City after three years at Radio City Music Hall and was broadcast live by CBS. James Corden served as host.Hamilton received a record-setting 16 nominations in 13 categories, ultimately winning 11 total. The revival of The Color Purple won two awards. The Humans won four awards, and the revival productions of plays Long Day's Journey into Night and A View from the Bridge each won two awards.

The ceremony received positive reviews, with many highlighting the performance of Corden as host. At the 69th Primetime Emmy Awards, it won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Special Class Program, and was nominated for Outstanding Writing for a Variety Special, Outstanding Technical Direction, Camerawork, Video Control for a Limited Series, Movie, or Special and Outstanding Lighting Design / Lighting Direction for a Variety Special.

America First (Homeland)

"America First" is the sixth season finale of the American television drama series Homeland, and the 72nd episode overall. It premiered on Showtime on April 9, 2017.

American Experience (season 29)

Season twenty-nine of the television program American Experience aired on the PBS network in the United States on January 10, 2017 and concluded on April 12, 2017. The season contained eight new episodes and began with the film Command and Control.

American Gods (TV series)

American Gods is an American fantasy drama television series based on Neil Gaiman's novel of the same name and developed by Bryan Fuller and Michael Green for the premium cable network Starz. Produced by Fremantle USA and distributed by Lionsgate Television, the first season premiered on April 30, 2017. Fuller and Green served as the showrunners for the first season, and were replaced by Jesse Alexander for the second season. Gaiman serves as an executive producer along with Fuller, Green, Craig Cegielski, Stefanie Berk, David Slade, and Adam Kane. Charles Eglee is set to serve as showrunner for the third season.

Ricky Whittle plays the series' lead Shadow Moon, who meets a strange man named Mr. Wednesday (Ian McShane) after being released from prison, and soon becomes embroiled in a large-scale conflict between the Old Gods and the New Gods, who grow stronger each day. In May 2017, the series was renewed for a second season, which premiered on March 10, 2019. The following week, Starz renewed American Gods for a third season.

The series received praise for its visual style and acting, and two nominations at the 69th Primetime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Main Title Design and Outstanding Special Visual Effects. It also received three nominations at the 8th Critics' Choice Television Awards, including Best Drama Series, Best Actor in a Drama Series for McShane and Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series for Gillian Anderson.

Bill Nye Saves the World

Bill Nye Saves the World is an American television show currently streaming on Netflix hosted by Bill Nye. The show's byline is, "Emmy-winning host Bill Nye brings experts and famous guests to his lab for a talk show exploring scientific issues that touch our lives", with the series' focus placed on science and its relationship with politics, pop culture, and society. The first season explores topics such as climate change, alternative medicine, and video games from a scientific point of view, while also refuting myths and anti-scientific claims.

Though the show is hosted by Nye, five correspondents assist in the presentation of the show. These include fashion model Karlie Kloss, science YouTuber and educator Derek Muller, comedian Nazeem Hussain, comedian and writer Joanna Hausmann, and the TV host and producer Emily Calandrelli. The thirteen-episode season premiered on April 21, 2017. The show's theme song was produced by Tyler, the Creator. On June 15, 2017, Nye announced on his Facebook page that the series had been renewed for a six-episodes second season, which premiered on December 29, 2017.

On April 9, 2018, Netflix announced the show had been renewed for a six-episode third season, released on May 11, 2018.

Claire Underwood

Claire Underwood (née Hale) is a fictional character in House of Cards, played by Robin Wright. She is the wife of the show's protagonist Francis J. Underwood (Kevin Spacey). She is a lobbyist and runs an environmental nonprofit organization, but in later seasons ascends to the positions of Second Lady of the United States, First Lady of the United States, the United States Ambassador to the United Nations, Vice President of the United States, and finally the 47th President of the United States. Underwood made her first appearance in the series' pilot episode, "Chapter 1". The character is based on Elizabeth Urquhart, a character from the eponymous British miniseries from which the current series is derived. Unlike the original character, however, Claire has her own storylines.The role has been critically acclaimed. Wright won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Television Series Drama for this role at the 71st Golden Globe Awards, becoming the first actress to win a Golden Globe Award for a web television online-only role in a series. She was nominated for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series for this role at the 65th, 66th, 67th, 68th and 69th Primetime Emmy Awards.

In November 2017, Netflix fired Spacey from the series after a number of people accused him of sexual misconduct. The Frank Underwood character was written out of the show as having died, and Claire became the main character of the show's sixth and final season.

Danny!

Daniel Keith Swain, (b. August 18, 1983) known mononymously as Danny!, is an American rapper, singer-songwriter, composer, record producer and voice actor.Swain rose to prominence shortly after his debut performance on Late Night With Jimmy Fallon, where he premiered his single "Evil"; he subsequently began a side career in voice acting, narrating the fifteenth season of ESPN's Hey Rookie, Welcome to the NFL. Swain appeared on Sesame Street that same year.

In 2013, Ebony magazine listed Swain among other rising artists in its "Leaders of the New School" piece, calling Swain one of a handful of "innovators". GQ praised Swain's music production as "brilliantly savvy". Swain composed background music that has since been placed in numerous motion pictures and television programs, most notably, FOX's animated series Bob's Burgers for which Swain was awarded an Emmy plaque for his contributions to an episode that won in the Outstanding Animated Program category at the 69th Primetime Emmy Awards in 2017.

Expenses (Better Call Saul)

"Expenses" is the seventh episode of the third season of the AMC television series Better Call Saul, the spinoff series of Breaking Bad. The episode aired on May 22, 2017 on AMC in the United States.

Gloria Burgle

Gloria Burgle is a fictional character in the FX television series Fargo. She is the female protagonist of the third season and is portrayed by actress Carrie Coon.

Gordon Smith (screenwriter)

Gordon Smith is an American television screenwriter, best known for his work on Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul. Smith has been nominated for two individual Primetime Emmys, and won the Writers Guild of America Award for Television: Episodic Drama in 2018 for the episode "Chicanery", and has received several other nominations.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Contemporary Costumes

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Contemporary Costumes is presented as part of the Primetime Emmy Awards. In 2015, this category and Outstanding Costumes for a Period/Fantasy Series, Limited Series, or Movie were created. They replaced the now retired categories of Outstanding Costumes for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special and Outstanding Costumes for a Series.

Rules require that nominations are distributed proportionally among regular series and limited series/movies, based on the number of submissions of each. For instance, if two-fifths of submissions are limited series/movies then two of the five nominees will be limited series/movies.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Fantasy/Sci-Fi Costumes

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Fantasy/Sci-Fi Costumes is presented as part of the Primetime Emmy Awards. In 2015, categories for period/fantasy and contemporary costumes were created. The categories were divided in 2018 for period and fantasy/sci-fi costumes. They replaced the retired categories for Outstanding Costumes for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special and Outstanding Costumes for a Series.

Rules require that nominations are distributed proportionally among regular series and limited series/movies, based on the number of submissions of each. For instance, if two-fifths of submissions are limited series/movies then two of the five nominees will be limited series/movies.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Period Costumes

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Period Costumes is presented as part of the Primetime Emmy Awards. In 2015, categories for period/fantasy and contemporary costumes were created. The categories were divided in 2018 for period and fantasy/sci-fi costumes. They replaced the retired categories for Outstanding Costumes for a Miniseries, Movie, or Special and Outstanding Costumes for a Series.

Rules require that nominations are distributed proportionally among regular series and limited series/movies, based on the number of submissions of each. For instance, if two-fifths of submissions are limited series/movies then two of the five nominees will be limited series/movies.

Stephen Colbert

Stephen Tyrone Colbert ( kohl-BAIR; born May 13, 1964) is an American comedian, writer, producer, political commentator, actor, and television host. He is best known for hosting the satirical Comedy Central program The Colbert Report from 2005 to 2014 and the CBS talk program The Late Show with Stephen Colbert beginning in September 2015.Colbert originally studied to be a dramatic actor, but became interested in improvisational theatre while attending Northwestern University, where he met Second City director Del Close. Colbert first performed professionally as an understudy for Steve Carell at Second City Chicago, where his troupe mates included Paul Dinello and Amy Sedaris, comedians with whom he developed the sketch comedy series, Exit 57. He wrote and performed on the short-lived Dana Carvey Show before collaborating with Sedaris and Dinello again on the cult television series Strangers with Candy. He gained attention for his role on the latter as closeted gay history teacher Chuck Noblet.

Colbert's work as a correspondent on Comedy Central's news-parody series The Daily Show gained him wide recognition. In 2005, he left The Daily Show to host The Colbert Report. Following The Daily Show's news-parody concept, The Colbert Report was a parody of personality-driven political opinion shows including The O'Reilly Factor, in which he portrayed a caricatured version of conservative political pundits. The series became one of Comedy Central's highest-rated series, earning Colbert an invitation to perform as featured entertainer at the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner in 2006. After ending The Colbert Report, he was hired in 2015 to succeed retiring David Letterman as host of the Late Show on CBS. He hosted the 69th Primetime Emmy Awards in September 2017.

Colbert has won nine Primetime Emmy Awards, two Grammy Awards, and two Peabody Awards. Colbert was named one of Time's 100 Most Influential People in 2006 and 2012. Colbert's book, I Am America (And So Can You!), was listed #1 on The New York Times Best Seller list in 2007.

United Shades of America

United Shades of America is a Cable News Network (CNN) American documentary television series starring comedian W. Kamau Bell. Bell visits communities across America to understand the challenges they face. The show won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Unstructured Reality Program at the 69th Primetime Emmy Awards and the 70th Primetime Emmy Awards.A second season with eight new episodes aired in 2017. The third season began on April 29, 2018. On April 3, 2019, it was announced that the series was renewed for a fourth season which premiered on April 22, 2019.

Web television

Web television is original episodic content produced for broadcast via the Internet. The phrase "web television" is also sometimes used to refer to Internet television in general, which includes Internet-transmission of programs produced for both online and traditional terrestrial, cable, or satellite broadcast.

Web television content includes web series such as Red vs. Blue (2003–present), Husbands (2011–present), The Lizzie Bennet Diaries (2012–2013), Video Game High School (2012–2014), Carmilla (2014–2016), and Teenagers (2014–present), among hundreds of others; original miniseries such as Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog (2008); animated shorts such as those of Homestar Runner; and exclusive video content that supplements conventional television broadcasts. The current major distributors of web television are Amazon, Blip.tv, Crackle, Hulu, Netflix, Newgrounds, Roku, and YouTube. Examples of web television production companies include: Generate LA-NY, Next New Networks, Revision3, and Vuguru.

In 2008, the International Academy of Web Television, headquartered in Los Angeles, formed in order to organize and support web television authors, actors, producers, and executives. The organization also administers the selection of winners for the Streamy Awards. In 2009, the Los Angeles Web Series Festival was founded. Several other festivals and award shows have been dedicated solely to web content, including the Indie Series Awards and the Vancouver Web Series Festival.

In 2013, in response to the soap opera All My Children shifting from broadcast to web television, a new category for "Fantastic web-only series" in the Daytime Emmy Awards was created. Later that year, Netflix made history by earning the first Primetime Emmy Award nominations for web television series, for Arrested Development, Hemlock Grove, and House of Cards, at the 65th Primetime Emmy Awards. Hulu earned the first Emmy win for "Outstanding Series", for the webTV The Handmaid's Tale at the 69th Primetime Emmy Awards.

Westworld (season 1)

The first season of the American science fiction western television series Westworld (subtitled The Maze) premiered on HBO on October 2, 2016, and concluded on December 4, 2016. It consisted of ten episodes, each running approximately 60 minutes in length and was broadcast on Sundays in the United States. The complete first season was released on home media on November 7, 2017.

The television series was created by Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy, and it is based on the 1973 film of the same name, written and directed by Michael Crichton. Among the series' ensemble cast, it stars Evan Rachel Wood, Thandie Newton, Jeffrey Wright, James Marsden, Ed Harris, and Anthony Hopkins.

The first season received very positive reviews from critics, with particular praise for the visuals, story, and performances. The series received seven nominations at the 69th Primetime Emmy Awards, including for Outstanding Drama Series; however, the series did not win in any category.

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