68th Armor Regiment

The 68th Armor Regiment was first activated in 1933 in the Regular Army as the 68th Infantry Regiment (Light Tanks).

68th Armor Regiment
1-68coatofarms
Coat of arms
Active1933 – present
Country United States
Branch United States Army
TypeArmor
SizeRegiment
Garrison/HQFort Carson
Nickname(s)"Silver Lions"
Motto(s)Ventre a Terre (Bellies to the Ground)
Insignia
Distinctive unit insignia
68 Arm Rgt DUI
68th Armor Regiment's 4th Battalion beret flash
US Army 68th Armor Regiment Flash
U.S. Infantry Regiments
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67th Infantry Regiment 69th Infantry Regiment

Lineage

  • Constituted 9 July 1918 in the Regular Army as the 68th Infantry. Assigned to the 9th Infantry Division Organized July 1918 at Camp Sheridan, Alabama. from personnel of the 46th Infantry. relieved from the 9th Division and demobilized 15 February 1919 at Camp Sheridan.)
  • Constituted 1 October 1933 in the Regular Army as the 68th Infantry Regiment (Light Tanks), by redesignation of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th Tank Companies as Organic Companies of the 68th Infantry Regiment. See Below.

1st Tank Company

  • Organized 7 June 1918 in the National Army in France as Company A, 327th Battalion, Tank Corps, American Expeditionary Force.[1]
  • Redesignated 12 September 1918 as Company A, 345th Battalion, Tank Corps.[1]
  • Reorganized and redesignated 8 January 1921 as the 1st Tank Company and allotted to the Regular Army
  • Assigned 1 April 1921 to the 1st Division
  • Relieved 16 October 1939 from assignment to the 1st Division
  • Consolidated 1 January 1940 with Company A, 68th Infantry and consolidated unit designated as Company A, 68th Infantry.
  • Inactivated 5 June 1940 at Fort Benning.
  • Redesignated 15 July 1940 as Company A, 68th Armored Regiment, and assigned to 2nd Armored Division.
  • Activated 1 August 1940 at Fort Benning.
  • See Regiment for further history

2nd Tank Company

  • Organized 7 June 1918 in the National Army in France as Company C, 327th Battalion, Tank Corps, AEF.[1]
  • Redesignated 12 September 1918 as Company C, 345th Battalion, Tank Corps.[1]
  • Reorganized and redesignated 8 January 1921 as the 2nd Tank Company and allotted to the Regular Army
  • Redesignated 1 January 1940 as Company D, 68th Infantry Regiment (Light Tanks).
  • Redesignated 15 July 1940 as Company D, 68th Armored Regiment, and assigned to the 2nd Armored Division.

3rd Tank Company

  • Organized April 1918 in the National Army at Camp Colt, Pennsylvania as Company A, 328th Battalion, Tank Corps
  • Reorganized and redesignated 8 January 1921 as the 3rd Tank Company, allotted to the Regular Army.
  • Redesignated 1 January 1940 as Company E, 68th Infantry (Light Tanks).
  • Redesignated 15 July 1940 as Company E, 68th Armored Regiment, and assigned to the 2nd Armored Division.

4th Tank Company

  • Organized April 1918 in the National Army at Camp Colt, Pennsylvania as Company C, 328th Battalion, Tank Corps
  • Reorganized and redesignated 8 January 1921 as the 4th Tank Company, allotted to the Regular Army, and assigned to the 4th Division)
  • Inactivated 27 September 1921 at Fort Lewis, Washington.
  • Activated 15 September 1931 at Fort McClellan, Alabama.
  • Redesignated 1 January 1940 as Company B, 68th Infantry (Light Tanks), and relieved from assignement to the 4th Division.
  • Inactivated 5 June 1940 at Fort Benning, Georgia
  • Redesignated 15 July 1940 as Company B, 68th Armored Regiment, and assigned to 2nd Armored Division.
  • Activated 1 August 1940 at Fort Benning.

5th and 6th Tank Companies

  • Organized 17 February 1918 as B Company (Provisional), Tank Service, American Expeditionary Force.[1]
  • Redesignated 16 April 1918 in the National Army at Borg, France as Company B, 1st Tank Center, American Expeditionary Force.[1]
  • Redesignated on 6 June 1918 as Company B, 326th Battalion, Tank Corps.[1]
  • Redesignated 1 September 1918 as Company B, 344th Battalion, Tank Corps.[1]
  • Reorganized and redesignated 8 January 1921 as the 5th Tank Company, allotted to the Regular Army.
  • Consolidated 1 January 1940 with 6th Tank Company, and then reorganized and redesignated as Company C, 68th infantry Regiment
  • Inactivated 5 June 1940 at Fort Benning, Georgia.
  • Redesignated 15 July 1940 as Company C, 68th Armored Regiment, and assigned to 2nd Armored Division.
  • Activated 1 August 1940 at Fort Benning.

7th Tank Company

  • Organized 7 June 1918 as Company B, 327th Battalion, Tank Corps, American Expeditionary Force.[1]
  • Redesignated 12 September 1918 as Company B, 345th Battalion, Tank Corps.[1]
  • Reorganized and redesignated 8 January 1921 as the 2nd Tank Company, allotted to the Regular Army.
  • Inactivated 6 September 1921 at Camp Meade, Maryland.
  • Redesignated 1 January 1940 as Company F, 68th Infantry Regiment (Light Tanks), and activated at Fort Benning, Georgia.
  • Redesignated 15 July 1940 as Company F, 68th Armored Regiment, and assigned to 2nd Armored Division.

Company G, 68th Infantry Regiment (Light Tanks)

  • Constituted 1 October 1933 in the Regular Army as Company G, 68th Infantry Regiment (Light Tanks).
  • Redesignated 15 July 1940 as Company G, 68th Armored Regiment, and assigned to 2nd Armored Division.
  • Activated 13 August 1940 at Fort Benning.

Company H, 68th Infantry Regiment (Light Tanks)

  • Constituted 1 October 1933 in the Regular Army as Company G, 68th Infantry Regiment (Light Tanks).
  • Redesignated 15 July 1940 as Company G, 68th Armored Regiment, and assigned to 2nd Armored Division.
  • Activated 13 August 1940 at Fort Benning.

Armored regiment

  • (1st and 2nd Battalions activated 1 January 1940 at Fort Benning, Georgia, as Infantry Tank Battalions (See Above);
  • 1st Battalion inactivated 5 June 1940 at Fort Benning, Georgia, (See Above).
  • Converted and redesignated 15 July 1940 as the 68th Armored Regiment and assigned to the 2d Armored Division.
  • Regiment (less the 2nd Battalion, which was already active) activated 1 August 1940 at Fort Benning, Georgia.
  • Inactivated 8 January 1942 at Fort Benning, Georgia, and relieved from assignment to the 2d Armored Division
  • Assigned 15 February 1942 to the 6th Armored Division and activated at Fort Knox, Kentucky
  • Moved to Camp Chaffee, Arkansas on 20 March 1942 for divisional training and maneuvers.
  • Moved to Camp Young, California on 12 October 1942 to train at the Desert Training Center.

Triangulation

  • Regiment broken up 20 September 1943 and its elements reorganized and redesignated as follows:
  1. Regimental Headquarters and Headquarters Company and 2d Battalion as the 68th Tank Battalion and remained assigned to the 6th Armored Division
  2. 1st Battalion as the 773d Tank Battalion and relieved from assignment to the 6th Armored Division
  3. 3d Battalion as the 15th Tank Battalion and remained assigned to the 6th Armored Division
  4. Reconnaissance Company as Troop D, 86th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron, Mechanized, and remained an element of the 6th Armored Division
  5. Maintenance and Service Companies, and Band disbanded.

World War II

Troop D, 86th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron

15th Tank Battalion

  • Deployed from the New York Port of Embarkation on 11 February 1944.
  • Arrived in England on 24 February 1944.
  • Further deployed to France on 22 July 1944
  • Located at Jena, Germany on 14 August 1945[2]
  • Returned to the New York Port of Embarkation on 20 February 1946

68th Tank Battalion

  • Deployed from the New York Port of Embarkation on 11 February 1944.
  • Arrived in England on 24 February 1944.
  • Further deployed to France on 22 July 1944
  • Located at Buttstädt, Germany on 14 August 1945[2]
  • Returned to the Hampton Roads Port of Embarkation on 29 December 1945

773rd Tank Battalion

  • Battalion did not deploy.

Reconsolidation

  • After 20 September 1943 the above units underwent changes that resulted in reconsolidation as follows:
  1. 68th Tank Battalion relieved 19 July 1945 from assignment to the 6th Armored Division
    Inactivated 29 December 1945 at Camp Patrick Henry, Virginia
    Redesignated 21 August 1950 as the 68th Medium Tank Battalion and assigned to the 6th Armored Division
    Activated 5 September 1950 at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri
    Inactivated 16 March 1956 at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri
    Relieved 1 July 1957 from assignment to the 6th Armored Division.
  2. 773d Tank Battalion reorganized and redesignated 27 October 1943 as the 773d Amphibian Tank Battalion
    Reorganized and redesignated 10 January 1944 as the 773d Amphibian Tractor Battalion
    Inactivated 15 April 1946 in Japan
    Redesignated 24 December 1946 as the 56th Amphibian Tractor Battalion
    Redesignated 18 April 1949 as the 56th Amphibious Tank and Tractor Battalion
    Activated 10 May 1949 at Fort Worden, Washington
    Inactivated 15 December 1954 at Fort Worden, Washington
  3. 15th Tank Battalion relieved 9 July 1945 from assignment to the 6th Armored Division
    Inactivated 22 February 1946 – 25 February 1946 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey.
  4. Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 15th Tank Battalion, redesignated 1 August 1946 as 15th Tank Company, and activated at Fort Riley, Kansas
    Inactivated 6 November 1946 at Fort Riley, Kansas
    Activated 1 June 1947 in Italy
    Inactivated 1 December 1949 in Italy
    Redesignated 21 August 1950 as Headquarters, Headquarters and Service Company, 15th Medium Tank Battalion (organic elements of the 15th Tank Battalion redesignated as elements of the 15th Medium Tank Battalion), and assigned to the 6th Armored Division
    Battalion activated 5 September 1950 at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri
    Inactivated 16 March 1956 at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri
    Relieved 1 July 1957 from assignment to the 6th Armored Division.
  5. Troop D, 86th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron, Mechanized, inactivated 19 September 1945 at Camp Myles Standish, *Massachusetts
    Redesignated 21 August 1950 as Company D, 86th Reconnaissance Battalion, and remained an element of the 6th Armored Division
    Activated 5 September 1950 at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri
    Inactivated 16 March 1956 at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri
    Relieved 1 July 1957 from assignment to the 6th Armored Division.
  6. Maintenance and Service Companies, 68th Armored Regiment, reconstituted 1 July 1957 in the Regular Army
  • 68th and 15th Medium Tank Battalions; 56th Amphibious Tank and Tractor Battalion; Company D, 86th Reconnaissance Battalion; and Maintenance and Service Companies, 68th Armored Regiment, consolidated, reorganized, and redesignated 1 July 1957 as the 68th Armor Regiment, a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System

Post World War II

3ABCT, Shots fired 170116-A-XH946-896
1-68th Armor, 4th Infantry Division conducts live-fire certification with their M1A2 Abrams in Poland
4-68th Armor, 82nd Airborne Division conducts live fire certification with their LAV-25A2s at Camp Atterbury

Honors

Campaign participation credit

  • World War I:
  1. Saint-Mihiel;
  2. Meuse-Argonne
  • World War II:
  1. Normandy;
  2. Northern France;
  3. Rhineland;
  4. Ardennes-Alsace;
  5. Central Europe;
  6. Western Pacific (with arrowhead);
  7. Ryukyu Islands (with arrowhead)
  • Korean War:
  1. Korea, Summer 1953

Decorations

  1. Presidential Unit Citation (Navy) for SAIPAN AND TINIAN

History of the silver lions

The 'Silver Lions" of 1st Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment, were the only armor battalion located on Fort Carson, with 48 M1A1 Abrams Main Battle Tanks, 32 Armored Personnel Carriers, Over 50 Tactical Wheeled vehicles, 5 Tracked Maintenance/Recovery vehicles and over 600 personnel. 1–68 Armor had 4 Companies (HHC, A, B, and C), with 14 M1A1 Main Battle Tanks in each Line Company (A, B, and C). To Support the 3 line Companies there was Headquarters and Headquarters Company (HHC), the largest of the four Companies with over 300 personnel. Located in HHC were platoons of Cavalry Reconnaissance, Mortar, Maintenance, Headquarters, Signal, Supply, Intelligence, Cooks, Chemical, Administration and Medics for the Battalion.

Before the Force 21 Concept, 1st Battalion, 68th Armor had 5 companies (HHC, A, B, C and D). On 13 April 2000, A Company was deactivated, turning all 14 tanks to the Mississippi National Guard. D Company was deactivated on 14 April 2000 and re-flagged as A Company, leaving the battalion with the standard four companies, rather than five.

Current organization of 1–68

Upon return from deployment to OIF 1, the 4th Infantry Division immediately began reorganization into the "modular brigade" structure of the new U.S. Army. 4th Infantry Division was again deployed to OIF in late 2005, replacing 3rd ID in Baghdad. The 3rd Brigade was attached to the 101st and the 1–68 was sent to Baqubah, Iraq.

After being reorganized under the modular concept, the 1st Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment became known as the 1st Combined Arms Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment. HHC, known as Hatchet, with scouts, snipers, mortars, medics and staff positions. Alpha, known as Attack, and Bravo, known as Blackhawk, were designated as infantry companies with M2A3 Bradley fighting vehicles. Charlie company known as Cold Steel, and Delta, known as Destroyer, were set up as tank companies with 14 M1A2 Abrams main battle tanks each. Echo Company, known as Exile company, as an engineering company. Fox company, known as Forerunner, was attached from 64th Brigade Support Battalion to provide mess support, maintenance/recovery, and a supply distribution platoon. The final company is Golf Company, which is the rear-detachment company for the battalion when it is deployed.

The battalion's last Iraq deployment was to Basra, as a part of OIF 10–11.

See also

Sources

  • http://www.army/1-68ar.htm
  • http://www.carson.army.mil/units/4id/index.htm
  • http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/agency/
  • USA Airborne - 50th Anniversary, Turner, 1990 ISBN 978-0938021902

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Part of the World War One Light Tank Brigade established in the American Expeditionary Force Commanded by COL. George S. Patton, Junior.
  2. ^ a b c VJ Day
  3. ^ USA Airborne - 50th Annivesary, p. 452, 463, 469
  4. ^ "Army's Newest Airborne Unit Gets Second-Hand But Air Droppable USMC LAV-25 Armored Vehicles". The Drive. 29 October 2018. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
1st Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment

The 1st Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment (1–68 Armor) is a battalion of the 68th Armor Regiment, United States Army.

2003 invasion of Iraq order of battle

This is the order of battle for Invasion of Iraq in the Iraq War between coalition forces and Iraqi regular forces supported by Fedayeen Saddam irregulars and others between March 19 and May 1, 2003.

4th Infantry Division (United States)

The 4th Infantry Division is a division of the United States Army based at Fort Carson, Colorado. It is composed of a Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, three brigade combat teams (1st Stryker BCT, 2nd Infantry BCT, and 3rd Armored BCT), a Combat Aviation Brigade, the 4th Infantry Division Sustainment Brigade, and a Division Artillery.

The 4th Infantry Division's official nickname, "Ivy", is a play on words of the Roman numeral IV or 4. Ivy leaves symbolize tenacity and fidelity which is the basis of the division's motto: "Steadfast and Loyal". The second nickname, "Iron Horse", has been adopted to underscore the speed and power of the division and its soldiers.

68th Regiment

68th Regiment or 68th Infantry Regiment may refer to:

68th (Durham) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry), an infantry unit of the British Army

68th Armor Regiment, an armoured unit of the US Army

68th Armoured Regiment (India), a armoured unit of the Indian ArmyAmerican Civil War68th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment, a unit of the Union (Northern) Army

68th Indiana Infantry Regiment, a unit of the Union (Northern) Army

68th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, a unit of the Union (Northern) Army

68th Ohio Infantry, a unit of the Union (Northern) Army

68th Pennsylvania Infantry, a unit of the Union (Northern) Army

73rd Cavalry Regiment

The 73rd Cavalry Regiment is a Cavalry Regiment in the United States Army, first formed in 1941. The three squadrons of the 73rd Cavalry Regiment ("Airborne Thunder") provide reconnaissance, surveillance and target acquisition (RSTA) to the Brigade Combat Teams of the 82nd Airborne Division. 3rd Squadron is assigned to 1st Brigade, 1st Squadron is assigned to 2nd Brigade, and the 5th Squadron is assigned to 3rd Brigade.

There is currently no 2nd or 4th Squadron, nor is there a regimental command. Formerly organized as the 4th Battalion of the 68th Armor Regiment, the 3rd Battalion was equipped with M-551 Sheridan armored reconnaissance vehicles to support the 82nd Airborne Division with light armor support until after Operation Desert Storm.

82nd Airborne Division

The 82nd Airborne Division is an airborne infantry division of the United States Army, specializing in parachute assault operations into denied areas with a U.S. Department of Defense requirement to "respond to crisis contingencies anywhere in the world within 18 hours." Based at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, the 82nd Airborne Division is part of the XVIII Airborne Corps. The 82nd Airborne Division is the U.S. Army's most strategically mobile division. Some journalists have reported that the 82nd Airborne is the best trained light infantry division in the world. More recently, the 82nd Airborne has been conducting operations in Iraq, advising and assisting Iraqi Security Forces.The All American division was constituted, originally as the 82nd Division, in the National Army on 5 August 1917, shortly after the American entry into World War I. It was organized on 25 August 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia and later served with distinction on the Western Front in the final months of World War I. Since its initial members came from all 48 states, the division acquired the nickname All-American, which is the basis for its famed "AA" shoulder patch. The division later served in World War II where, in August 1942, it was reconstituted as the first airborne division of the U.S. Army and fought in numerous campaigns during the war.

Famous soldiers of the division include: Sergeant Alvin C. York; General James M. Gavin; General of the Army Omar Bradley; Senator Strom Thurmond (325th Glider Infantry Regiment in World War II); Senator Jack Reed; R&B singer Lou Rawls; actor William Windom; country music singer Craig Morgan; Renown Independent Baptist Minister Jack Hyles; former Syracuse University football coach Ben Schwartzwalder; fashion critic/choreographer Bruce Darnell; The Honorable Patrick Murphy (Under Secretary of the Army); Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards; General "Henry" Hugh Shelton (Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 1997 to 2001); and Colonel Chris Gibson, former commander of the 2d Battalion, 325th Infantry Regiment, and later commander of the division's 2d Brigade Combat Team, now a New York Congressman.

Armor Branch

The Armor Branch of the United States Army is an active combat arms branch.

It was created provisionally in 1940 as Armored Force under Chief of the Armored Force, Brigadier General Adna R. Chaffee, Jr. and took control of all tank units in infantry and cavalry units.

Camp Atterbury

Camp Atterbury, located in south-central Indiana, about 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Edinburgh, Indiana, serves as a military and civilian training base under the auspices of the Indiana National Guard. The camp is named in memory of William Wallace Atterbury, a New Albany, Indiana, native who received a Distinguished Service Medal for his contributions during World War I. Initially established in 1941 on 40,351.5348 acres (163.296868 km2) of land, Camp Atterbury opened in 1942 and continues to embody its motto, Preparamus (We Are Ready), as a site for preparing American military personnel and civilians for service.

During its peak years during World War II, Camp Atterbury's primary mission was to provide combat training for the U.S. Army. Numerous auxiliary and service units, as well as four U.S. Army divisions, trained at the camp between 1942 and 1944. Wakeman Hospital Center, the camp's 6,000-bed hospital and convalescent center, became the largest in the Fifth Service Command. It trained medical personnel and treated an estimated 85,000 patients during the war. Between 1943 and 1946, a portion of the camp was used an internment compound for an estimated 15,000 soldiers, most of them Italian and German prisoners of war. A small chapel that the Italian prisoners built in 1943 is the camp's only remaining POW-related structure. Camp Atterbury also served as a military reception and separation center during the war. Its separation center, one of eighteen such facilities in the United States, discharged a total of 537,344 enlisted men and 39,495 officers from military service. Camp Atterbury and Wakeman Hospital were deactivated in December 1946.

After World War II, Camp Atterbury remained on stand-by status until 1950, when it was reactivated as a military training center during the Korean War. After the U.S. Army discontinued its use as a military installation in December 1968, the Indiana National Guard assumed responsibility for oversight of the camp. Since 1969 the camp had continued to serve as a military and civilian training facility. It supports the Indiana National Guard and its missions, the Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center (CAJMTC), and the Muscatatuck Urban Training Center (MUTC). In addition, portions of the camp have been leased to other groups, including the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, the Atterbury Job Corps, and the Johnson County, Indiana, parks department, among others.

Camp Myles Standish

Camp Myles Standish was a U.S. Army camp located in Taunton, Massachusetts. It functioned as a departure area for about a million U.S. and Allied soldiers and prisoner-of-war camp during World War II. Immediately after, it was considered as a candidate site for the United Nations Headquarters.

Distinctive unit insignia

A distinctive unit insignia (DUI) is a metallic heraldic badge or device worn by soldiers in the United States Army. The DUI design is derived from the coat of arms authorized for a unit. DUIs may also be called "distinctive insignia" (DI) or, imprecisely, a "crest" or a "unit crest" by soldiers or collectors. The U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry is responsible for the design, development and authorization of all DUIs.

John Bahnsen

John C. "Doc" Bahnsen, Jr. (born November 8, 1934) is a retired United States Army Brigadier General and decorated veteran of the Vietnam War.

John L. Hines Jr.

John L. Hines Jr. (March 8, 1905 – November 19, 1986) was an officer in the United States Army and the son of General John L. Hines.Hines graduated from West Point in 1927, and served in World War II with the 6th Armored Division as a colonel, commanding the division's Combat Command A from November 1944 to March 1945. He was twice decorated with the Distinguished Service Cross and was severely wounded outside Frankfurt, Germany when an anti-tank shell struck his face.

LAV-25

The LAV-25 (Light Armored Vehicle) is an eight-wheeled amphibious armored reconnaissance vehicle used by the United States Marine Corps, United States Army, and the Canadian Army. It was built by General Dynamics Land Systems Canada, developed from the Canadian built AVGP versions of the Swiss MOWAG Piranha 6x6 family of armored fighting vehicles.

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