62nd Air Defense Artillery Regiment

The 62nd Air Defense Artillery Regiment is an Air Defense Artillery regiment in the United States Army.

62nd Air Defense Artillery regiment
62nd Coast Artillery Regiment COA
Coat of arms
Active1917
CountryUSA
BranchArmy
TypeAir defense artillery
SizeRegiment
Motto(s)"Nitimur in Alta" (We Aim at High Things)
Mascot(s)Oozlefinch
Insignia
Distinctive unit insignia
62 ADA Bde DUI

Lineage

Constituted 10 December 1917 as the 62nd Artillery (CAC). Activated at Fort Winfield Scott 7 January 1918. Assigned to 33rd Brigade CAC, and shipped to Camp Mills New York arrived in France 21 July 1918; returned from France 19 February 1919, Demobilized at Camp Eustis March 1919.

  • Reconstituted 1 August 1921 as the 2nd Antiaircraft Battalion (CAC) and organized 4 September 1921 at Fort Totten (New York), with HHD&CT, Search Light, Gun, and Machine Gun Batteries.
  • Redesignated 1 June 1922 as 62nd Antiaircraft Battalion, (CAC), and firing batteries consolidated with inactive serially numbered companies as follows
  • Searchlight Battery as Battery A. consolidated with 82nd Company (CAC)
  • Gun Battery as Battery B. consolidated with 165th Company.
  • Machine gun Battery as Battery C. consolidated with 167th Company
  • HHD&CT redesignated 258th Company (CAC).

Battalion expanded to a regiment 27 August 1922 with HHB, Service Battery, HH&CT 1st Battalion, and nine lettered firing batteries as follows.

  • Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, from 9th Company (CAC)
  • Service Battery from 37th Company (CAC)
  • Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment & Combat Train 1st Battalion, from HHD 1st Battalion 62nd AA.
  • A. Battery from 82nd Company (CAC)
  • B. Battery from 17th Company (CAC)
  • C. Battery from 29th Company (CAC)
  • D. Battery from 33rd Company (CAC) (Inactive)
  • E. Battery from 30th Company (CAC)
  • F. Battery from 32nd Company (CAC)
  • G. Battery from 165th Company (CAC) (Inactive)
  • H. Battery from 167th Company (CAC) (Inactive)

Regiment Redesignated from 62nd Artillery (AA)(CAC) to 62nd Coast Artillery (AA) Regiment on 1 July 1924. and reorganized.

  • on 1 July 1939 Batteries D, G, and H activated.
  • 20 January 1941 personnel from Battery B, and Search Light Platoon Battery A. reassigned to Newfoundland and redesignated Battery A 421st CA (AA) Battalion 1 August 1942
  • 16 June 1941 Battery H, with Searchlight Platoon A battery attached, transferred to Tungdliarfik Fjord, and Bluie West, Greenland.
  • I. Battery (SL) Constituted from Battery H. 16 June 1941 and assigned as part of the garrison at Bluie West.
  • H. Battery (37mm AW) transferred less personnel and equipment back to Fort Totten 26 July 1941.
  • I. Battery inactivated and disbanded 12 December 1942, personnel and equipment transferred to Battery A 424th CA (AW) Battalion. Battery I transferred to Fort Totten less personnel and equipment.
  • 3rd Battalion constituted 27 May 1942 and activated at Fort Totten 15 June 1942.

Regiment moved to Camp Kilmer, NJ. and staged for overseas shipment. sailed for United Kingdom on 6 August 1942.

  • Landed at Oran, Algeria, (Operation Torch), 11 November 1942. moved to Tunisia 10 June 1943.
  • Landed Licata, Sicily 23 July 1943
  • Inactivated at Palermo, Sicily 10 November 1943. broken up as follows-
  • HHB redesignated 80th AAA Group.
  • 1st Battalion redesignated 62nd AAA (Gun) Battalion.
  • 2nd Battalion redesignated 893rd AAA (AW) Battalion.
  • 3rd Battalion redesignated 331st AAA (SL) Battalion.

62nd Coast Artillery (AA) disbanded 4 December 1943.

62nd AAA Battalion moved to Italy 7 July 1944 and landed in southern France 16 August 1944. inactivated 13 March 1946 at Camp Kilmer
  • Redesignated 9 December 1948 as 62nd Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, and reactivated 15 January 1949 at Fort Bliss.
  • assigned to 2nd Armored Division 4 November 1949
  • Relieved from 2nd Armor 20 October 1950.
  • redesignated as the 62nd Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion 1 October 1953
  • Inactivated 15 September 1958 in Germany
  • Consolidated 24 June 1964 with 62nd Artillery a Parent Regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System.

Current units

  • 1st Battalion 62nd Air Defense Artillery Regiment [1]
  • 2nd Battalion 62nd Air Defense Artillery Regiment
  • 3rd Battalion 62nd Air Defense Artillery Regiment [2]

Distinctive unit insignia

  • Description

A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/32 inches (2.78 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gyronny of six embattled Azure and Gules, a circle of sixteen mullets Argent.

  • Symbolism

Units of the 62d Coast Artillery Regiment, from which the 62d Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion descended, participated in six wars- The War of 1812, Indian Wars, Mexican War, Civil War, Spanish–American War, and the Philippine Insurrection. This participation is symbolized by the six embattled sectors. At the time the first unit was organized the uniforms worn by the Artillery were dark blue faced with scarlet, and there were sixteen states in the Union, commemorated by the blue and red of the shield and the sixteen mullets, respectively.

  • Background

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 62d Coast Artillery Regiment on 21 February 1929. It was redesignated for the 62d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion on 23 August 1949. It was redesignated for the 62d Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion on 4 January 1956. The insignia was redesignated for the 62d Artillery Regiment on 19 December 1958. It was redesignated for the 62d Air Defense Artillery Regiment effective 1 September 1971.

Coat of arms

Blazon

  • Shield

Gyronny of six embattled Azure and Gules, a circle of sixteen mullets Argent.

  • Crest

On a wreath of the colors Argent and Azure, on a saltire Azure fimbriated Argent two arrows of the last, all entwined with a serpent Vert. Motto: NITIMUR IN ALTA (We Aim At High Things).

Symbolism

  • Shield

Units of the 62d Coast Artillery Regiment, from which the 62d Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion descended, participated in six wars- The War of 1812, Indian Wars, Mexican War, Civil War, Spanish–American War, and the Philippine Insurrection. This participation is symbolized by the six embattled sectors. At the time the first unit was organized the uniforms worn by the Artillery were dark blue faced with scarlet, and there were sixteen states in the Union, commemorated by the blue and red of the shield and the sixteen mullets, respectively.

  • Crest

The saltire is from the Confederate flag and is blue to indicate that the service during the Civil War was with the Northern Army. The two arrows represent the Indian Wars and the serpent the Mexican War.

Background

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 62d Coast Artillery Regiment on 21 February 1929. It was redesignated for the 62d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion on 23 August 1949. It was redesignated for the 62d Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion on 4 January 1956. The insignia was redesignated for the 62d Artillery Regiment on 19 December 1958. It was redesignated for the 62d Air Defense Artillery Regiment effective 1 September 1971.

Campaign streamers

War of 1812

  • Streamer without inscription

Mexican War

  • Monterey
  • Vera Cruz
  • Contreras
  • Cerro Gordo
  • Molino Del Ray
  • Chapultepec
  • Puebla 1947

Indian Wars

  • Seminoles
  • Washington 1856
  • Washington 1858

Civil War

  • Bull Run
  • Mississippi River
  • Peninsula
  • Antietam
  • Fredericksburg
  • Chancellorsville
  • Gettysburg
  • Wilderness
  • Spotsylvania
  • Shenandoah
  • Maryland 1862
  • Maryland 1863
  • Tennessee 1863
  • Virginia 1863
  • Tennessee 1864

War with Spain

  • Manila

Philippine Insurrection

  • Manila
  • Malolos
  • Luzon 1899

World War II

  • Algeria-French Morocco
  • Tunisia
  • Sicily
  • Rome- Arno
  • Southern France
  • Rhineland
  • Ardennes-Alsace
  • Central Europe

Decorations

Presidential Unit Citation (Navy) Meritorious Unit Citation (Army)

References

  • Historical register and dictionary of the United States Army, from ..., Volume 1 By Francis Bernard Heitman [3]
  • Encyclopedia of United States Army insignia and uniforms By William K. Emerson (page 51).[4]
  • [5] lineage
  • Coast Artillery Journal August 1923 [6] page 139
  • Coast Artillery journal May 1931 [7]
  • Coast artillery Journal May 1930 [8]

External links

108th Air Defense Artillery Brigade (United States)

The 108th Air Defense Artillery Brigade is an air defense artillery brigade of the United States Army. The mission of the brigade is to train and maintain a strategic crisis response air defense artillery brigade capable of deploying worldwide, on short notice, to provide air defense force protection from air-breathing threats and tactical ballistic missiles, as well as allow freedom of maneuver for XVIII Airborne Corps operations.

62nd Regiment

62nd Regiment or 62nd Infantry Regiment may refer to:

62nd (Shawinigan) Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, a unit of the Canadian Army

62nd Field Artillery Regiment, RCA, a unit of the Canadian Army

62nd Reserve Artillery Regiment (Ireland), a unit of the Irish Reserve Defence Force

62nd Regiment of Foot (disambiguation), three units of the British Army have had this name

62nd Infantry Regiment (United States), a unit of the US Army

62nd Air Defense Artillery Regiment, a unit of the US ArmyAmerican Civil WarUnion (Northern) Army62nd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment

62nd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment

62nd Indiana Infantry Regiment

62nd Ohio Infantry

62nd Pennsylvania Infantry

62nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer InfantryConfederate (Southern) Army62nd Virginia Mounted Infantry

62nd Tennessee Infantry

7th Infantry Division (United States)

The 7th Infantry Division was an infantry division of the United States Army. Today, it exists as a unique 250-man administrative headquarters based at Joint Base Lewis-McChord overseeing several units, though none of the 7th Infantry Division's own historic forces are active.

The division was first activated in December 1917 in World War I, and based at Fort Ord, California for most of its history. Although elements of the division saw brief active service in World War I, it is best known for its participation in the Pacific Ocean theater of World War II where it took heavy casualties engaging the Imperial Japanese Army in the Aleutian Islands, Leyte, and Okinawa. Following the Japanese surrender in 1945, the division was stationed in Japan and Korea, and with the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950 was one of the first units in action. It took part in the Inchon Landings and the advance north until Chinese forces counter-attacked and almost overwhelmed the scattered division. The 7th later went on to fight in the Battle of Pork Chop Hill and the Battle of Old Baldy.

After the Korean War ended, the division returned to the United States. In the late 1980s, it briefly saw action overseas in Operation Golden Pheasant in Honduras and Operation Just Cause in Panama. In the early 1990s, it provided domestic support to the civil authorities in Operation Green Sweep and during the 1992 Los Angeles Riots. The division's final role was as a training and evaluation unit for Army National Guard brigades, which it undertook until its inactivation in 2006.

On 26 April 2012, the Department of Defense announced the reactivation of the 7th Infantry Division headquarters as an administrative unit.

Air Defense Artillery Branch

The Air Defense Artillery branch is the branch of the United States Army that specializes in anti-aircraft weapons (such as surface to air missiles). In the U.S. Army, these groups are composed of mainly air defense systems such as the Patriot Missile System, Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD), and the Avenger Air Defense system which fires the FIM-92 Stinger missile. The Air Defense Artillery branch descended from Anti-Aircraft Artillery (part of the U.S. Army Coast Artillery Corps until 1950, then part of the Artillery Branch) into a separate branch on 20 June 1968. On 1 December 1968, the ADA branch was authorized to wear modified Artillery insignia, crossed field guns with missile. The Branch Motto, "First To Fire", was adopted in 1986 by the attendees of the ADA Commanders' Conference at Fort Bliss. The motto refers to a speech given by General Jonathan Wainwright to veterans of the 200th Coast Artillery (Antiaircraft) stating they were the 'First to Fire' in World War II against the Empire of Japan.

MIM-104 Patriot

The MIM-104 Patriot is a surface-to-air missile (SAM) system, the primary of its kind used by the United States Army and several allied nations. It is manufactured by the U.S. defense contractor Raytheon and derives its name from the radar component of the weapon system. The AN/MPQ-53 at the heart of the system is known as the "Phased Array Tracking Radar to Intercept on Target" which is a backronym for PATRIOT. The Patriot System replaced the Nike Hercules system as the U.S. Army's primary High to Medium Air Defense (HIMAD) system, and replaced the MIM-23 Hawk system as the U.S. Army's medium tactical air defense system. In addition to these roles, Patriot has been given the function of the U.S. Army's anti-ballistic missile (ABM) system, which is now Patriot's primary mission. The system is expected to stay fielded until at least 2040.Patriot uses an advanced aerial interceptor missile and high-performance radar systems. Patriot was developed at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, which had previously developed the Safeguard ABM system and its component Spartan and hypersonic speed Sprint missiles. The symbol for Patriot is a drawing of a Revolutionary War-era Minuteman.

Patriot systems have been sold to the Netherlands, Poland, Germany, Japan, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Republic of China (Taiwan), Greece, Spain, United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Romania. South Korea purchased several second-hand Patriot systems from Germany after North Korea test-launched ballistic missiles to the Sea of Japan and proceeded with underground nuclear testing in 2006. Jordan also purchased several second-hand Patriot systems from Germany.

Poland hosts training rotations of a battery of U.S. Patriot launchers. This started in the town of Morąg in May 2010 but was later moved further from the Russian border to Toruń and Ustka due to Russian objections.

On December 4, 2012, NATO authorized the deployment of Patriot missile launchers in Turkey to protect the country from missiles fired in the civil war in neighboring Syria. Patriot was one of the first tactical systems in the U.S. Department of Defense’s (DoD) to employ lethal autonomy in combat.The Patriot system gained notoriety during the Persian Gulf War of 1991 with the claimed engagement of over 40 Iraqi Scud missiles, those claims became a source of controversy. The system was highly successfully used against Iraqi missiles in 2003 Iraq War, and has been also used by Saudi and Emirati forces in the Yemen conflict against Houthi missile attacks. The Patriot system achieved its first undisputed shootdowns of enemy aircraft in the service of the Israeli Air Defense Command. Israeli MIM-104D batteries shot down two Hamas UAVs during Operation Protective Edge in 2014 and later, on September 23, 2014, an Israeli Patriot battery shot down a Syrian Air Force Sukhoi Su-24 which had penetrated Israeli airspace, achieving the first shootdown of a manned enemy aircraft in the world for the system.

U.S. Army Regimental System

The United States Army Regimental System (USARS) was established in 1981 to replace the Combat Arms Regimental System, to provide each soldier with continuous identification with a single regiment, and to increase a soldier's probability of serving recurring assignments with his or her regiment. The USARS was intended to enhance combat effectiveness by providing the opportunity for a regimental affiliation, thus obtaining some of the benefits of the traditional regimental system.

United States invasion of Panama

The United States invasion of Panama, codenamed Operation Just Cause, occurred between mid-December 1989 and late January 1990. The invasion was led by the administration of President George H. W. Bush, ten years after the Torrijos–Carter Treaties were ratified to transfer control of the Panama Canal from the U.S. to Panama by 1 January 2000.

During the invasion, de facto Panamanian leader, military general and dictator Manuel Noriega was deposed, president-elect Guillermo Endara sworn into office, and the Panamanian Defense Force dissolved.

Artillery formations of the United States
Misc. formations
Air Defense Artillery
Coast Artillery
Field Artillery

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