61st World Science Fiction Convention

Torcon 3 was the 61st World Science Fiction Convention, held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada on August 28-September 1, 2003. The convention was held in the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, as well as the Fairmont Royal York and Crowne Plaza (now the InterContinental Toronto Centre) hotels. Torcon 3 was also the site of the 2003 Canvention.

Torcon 3, the 61st World Science Fiction Convention
61st Worldcon logo
GenreScience fiction
VenueMetro Toronto Convention Centre
Location(s)Toronto, Ontario
CountryCanada
InauguratedAugust 28-September 1, 2003
Organized byToronto World Science Fiction Convention in 2003
Filing statusNon-profit
Websitewww.torcon.org

Guests

Awards

The Hugo Awards, named after Hugo Gernsback, are presented every year for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The results are based on the ballots submitted by members of the World Science Fiction Society. Other awards, including the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer (since 1973), are also presented at each year's Worldcon.[1] [2][3]

Hugo Awards

This was the first time that the 'Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form' and 'Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form' awards were presented as separate categories.

Other awards

Prix Aurora Awards

  • Best Long-Form Work in English: Permanence by Karl Schroeder
  • Best Long-Form Work in French: Le Revenant de Fomalhaut by Jean-Louis Trudel
  • Best Short-Form Work in English: "Ineluctable" by Robert J. Sawyer
  • Best Short-Form Work in French: "La Guerre sans temps", Sylvie Bérard
  • Best Work in English (Other): Be VERY Afraid! by Edo van Belkom
  • Artistic Achievement: Mel Vavaroutsos
  • Fan Achievement (Publication): Made in Canada Newsletter, Don Bassie, ed. [webzine]
  • Fan Achievement (Organizational): Georgina Miles (Toronto Trek 16)
  • Fan Achievement (Other): Jason Taniguchi, one-man SF parody shows

Information

Site selection

Two site selection votes were held at Torcon 3.

Notable program participants

(in addition to guests of honor listed above)

Committee

  • Chair: Peter Jarvis
  • Vice-chair: Ken Smookler

Division heads

  • Programming: Terry Fong
  • Finance/Legal: Larry Hancock, Ken Smookler
  • Facilities: Murray Moore
  • Operations: Robbie Bourget
  • Events: Kathryn Grimbly-Bethke
  • Exhibits: Elaine Brennan
  • Communications: Michelle Boyce
  • Administration: Kent Bloom
  • Member Services: Lance Sibley

Board of directors

  • President: Ken Smookler
  • Directors: Peter Jarvis, Larry Hancock, Murray Moore, Jody Dix, Linda Ross-Mansfield, Hope Leibowitz

Bid

  • Bid Chair: Larry Hancock

See also

References

  1. ^ "Hugo Award FAQ". The Hugo Awards. World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved 2018-11-11.
  2. ^ "2003 Hugo Awards". The Hugo Awards. World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on April 7, 2015. Retrieved February 28, 2011.
  3. ^ Lee, Cynthia (August 31, 2003). "GTA writer wins sci-fi prize". Toronto Star. p. A.02. Retrieved February 10, 2010.

External links

Preceded by
60th World Science Fiction Convention
ConJose in San Jose, United States (2002)
List of Worldcons
61st World Science Fiction Convention
Torcon 3 in Toronto, Canada (2003)
Succeeded by
62nd World Science Fiction Convention
Noreascon 4 in Boston, United States (2004)
58th World Science Fiction Convention

The 58th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) was Chicon 2000, which was held in Chicago, United States from August 31 through September 4, 2000. The venues for 58th Worldcon were Hyatt Regency Chicago, Sofitel Hotel and Fairmont Hotel. The organizing committee was chaired by Tom Veal.The convention had 6,574 members, of whom 5,794 actually attended the convention.

60th World Science Fiction Convention

ConJose was the 60th World Science Fiction Convention, held in San Jose, California on August 29-September 2, 2002. The convention was held in the McEnery Convention Center, as well as the Fairmont San Jose and the Hilton San Jose & Towers. ConJose was co-chaired by Tom Whitmore and Kevin Standlee and organized under the auspices of San Francisco Science Fiction Conventions.

Guests of Honor for ConJose were writer Vernor Vinge, artist David Cherry, fans Jan and Bjo Trimble, and the imaginary Ferdinand Feghoot. Tad Williams served as toastmaster.

62nd World Science Fiction Convention

The 62nd World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) was Noreascon 4, which was held in Boston, Massachusetts, from September 2–6, 2004. The venues for the 62nd Worldcon were Hynes Convention Center, Sheraton Boston Hotel and Boston Marriott Copley Place. The convention was organized by Massachusetts Convention Fandom, Inc., and the organizing committee was chaired by Deb Geisler.

The convention had 7485 members, of whom 6008 actually attended the convention.

George R. R. Martin

George Raymond Richard Martin (born George Raymond Martin; September 20, 1948), also known as GRRM, is an American novelist and short story writer in the fantasy, horror, and science fiction genres, screenwriter, and television producer. He is best known for his series of epic fantasy novels, A Song of Ice and Fire, which was adapted into the HBO series Game of Thrones (2011–present).

In 2005, Lev Grossman of Time called Martin "the American Tolkien", and in 2011, he was included on the annual Time 100 list of the most influential people in the world.

John Hertz (fan)

John Frederick Hertz is a California lawyer and long-time Los Angeles, California science fiction fan.

Teddy Harvia

Teddy Harvia is the nom de plume of David Thayer, an American science fiction fan artist. "Teddy Harvia" is an anagram of "David Thayer". He was born in Oklahoma but grew up in and resides in Dallas, Texas.As of 2010, Teddy Harvia has won the Hugo Award for Best Fan Artist four times, and has been nominated an additional sixteen times for the award. For his service to Southern science fiction fandom, Harvia was presented the Rebel Award by the Southern Fandom Confederation in 1997 at that year's DeepSouthCon.David Thayer was chair of the bid to host the Worldcon in Cancún, Mexico, in 2003. (The bid lost to Torcon III and the 61st World Science Fiction Convention was held in Toronto.)

Torcon

Torcon is the name given to three Worldcons held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada:

Torcon I, the 6th World Science Fiction Convention, held in 1948

Torcon II, the 31st World Science Fiction Convention, held in 1973

Torcon 3, the 61st World Science Fiction Convention, held in 2003

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